(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Announcements"

Association of 

HICAGO 

heologic al 
Schools 



Bethany Theological Seminary 
Catholic Theological Union 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
GarretT'Evangelical Theological Seminary 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCoRMiCK Theological Seminary 
Meadville/ Lombard Theological School 
MuNDELEiN Seminary 
North Park Theological Seminary 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
19 8 9 - 19 90 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Association of Chicago Theological Schools 1 

Basic Information 1 

The Member Seminaries 2 

Common Council 8 

Faculty Area Groups 8 

Subclusters and Cooperative Activities 13 

Chicago Theological Institute 13 

The Committee on Academic Cooperation in Hyde Park 13 

The Committee on Interinstitutional Cooperation 14 

World Mission Institute 14 

ACTS Doctor of Ministry in Preaching 14 

Joint Hispanic Ministries Program 14 

Joint Black Ministries Program 15 

ACTS International Study Opportunities 15 

Feminist Theological Coalition 16 

Chicago Area Students of Theology 16 

Non-Credit Language Courses 16 

Cooperating Institutions 17 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 17 

Centro Para DesarroUo Comunitario y Liderato 17 

Chicago Center for Public Ministry 18 

The Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society 19 

Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 19 

Spertus College of Judaica 20 

Library Resources 21 

Academic Calendars 23 

Information about Course Listings 28 

Course Descriptions 31 

Fall 31 

Biblical Studies 31 

Historical Studies 36 

Theological Studies 39 

Ethical Studies 43 

Religion and Society Studies 45 

World Mission Studies 46 

History of Religions 47 

Ministry Studies 47 

Winter 57 

Biblical Studies 57 

Historical Studies 62 

Theological Studies 65 

Ethical Studies 68 

Religion and Society Studies 70 

World Mission Studies 71 

History of Religions 73 

Ministry Studies 73 

Spring 82 

Biblical Studies 82 

Historical Studies 87 

Theological Studies 90 

Ethical Studies 94 

Religion and Society Studies 94 

World Mission Studies 96 

History of Religions 97 

Ministry Studies 97 

Special Areas of Interest Within Courses of Study 107 

Hispanic Studies 107 

Korean Studies 108 

Black Studies 108 

Judaic Studies 109 

Women's Studies 109 

ACTS Personnel HO 

Faculty and Executive Officers 110 

Librarians 131 

Locations of ACTS Schools 132 

Catalog Editor: Jeannette R Scholer 



ASSOCIATION 

OF 

CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

BASIC INFORMATION 



The Association of Chicago Theological Schools, known as ACTS, was formed in 
1984 by twelve theological schools located in or near Chicago to provide means for 
cooperation among its member institutions in the areas of student cross-registration, 
library access and acquisitions, interchange among faculty members in the various disci- 
plines of theological education, and communications between the schools. Prior to 
1984, these schools had had many years of successful ecumenical cooperation, primarily 
through the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, the Chicago Theological Institute, 
and the Library Council. In addition to ACTS, various agreements between two or 
more institutions provide subclustering for cooperation according to specific programs 
and/or geographical proximity (see pp. 13-16). 

All of the schools in ACTS are accredited members of the Association of Theological 
Schools in the United States and Canada. Each is affiliated with or sponsored by a 
denomination, a diocese, a religious organization or several religious orders. Each offers 
professional degree programs for ministry at the master's and doctoral levels, and most 
offer other academic degrees as well. All offer some variety of continuing education for 
clergy and lay leaders, and conferences, lectures and other programs of interest to a 
wider public. 

Together, the schools within ACTS offer a rich network of resources for theological 
education, making it one of the outstanding centers of theological education in the 
world. Available to the approximately 3000 students currently enrolled at its member 
schools is a faculty of some 300, over 1000 courses offered annually, and library collec- 
tions of over 1 .3 million volumes and nearly 5000 currently received periodical subscrip- 
tions. Several schools have well-stocked theological bookstores. Additionally, ACTS 
makes it possible for students and faculty to pursue their work, study and reflection in 
interaction with people from many different cultural and theological traditions. 

Students in ACTS schools also have access to many other resources pertinent to the- 
ological education available through institutions related to ACTS (see pp. 17-20). 
Many also draw on the vast resources of other institutions of higher education and the 
numerous religious organizations and agencies in the Chicago area related to one or 
more of the institutions in ACTS. 

ACTS itself does not offer either courses or degrees. Application for enrollment is 
made to one of the member institutions. 

An essential tool for cross-registration purposes, this catalog also includes information 
about utilizing the many resources for theological education available to students 
enrolled in member schools of ACTS. 

The current officers of ACTS are: Mark Sisk, Chairperson; Donald Senior, Vice- 
Chairperson; Robert Johnston, Secretary; Duane Steiner, Treasurer. Inquiries regarding 
ACTS should be directed to President Mark Sisk, Seabury- Western Theological 
Seminary, 2122 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60201; Phone: (312) 328-9300. 



THE MEMBER SEMINARIES 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Bethany education is shaped by Church of the Brethren concerns in such areas as peace, 
discipleship, and servanthood. It seeks to provide a community of scholarship and love 
where insistence upon academic excellence is balanced by concern for personal growth. 
Curricular design includes peer accountability groupings oriented toward integration of 
heritage and ministerial competencies. 




President 
Dean of Faculty 
Dean of Students 
Treasurer and Business Manager 
Director of Development 
Associate in Development 
scrar 



Fumitaka Matsuoka 

John J. Cassel 

Duane L. Steiner 

E. Royd McDowell 

Kenneth S. Frantz 

Darlene S. Myers 



Degree Programs: 

M.A.Th. 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Butterfield and Meyers Roads 

Oak Brook, IL 60521 

(312) 620-2200 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



A collaborative school serving twenty religious orders, founded to promote diverse theo- 
logical and ministerial traditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Emphasis on 
preparation for ministry, hence flexible academic pattern augmented by strong field edu- 
cation programs. Other special features: fully individualized M.A. Program; World 
Mission Program designed to prepare American and foreign students to minister in other 
cultures. Programs open to all serious students, men and women. 

President Donald Senior, C.P. 

Vice President and Dean Thomas McGonigle, O.P. 
Vice President for Administration and Finances Maureen M. Sepkoski 

Dean of Students and Community Services Mary R. Ulmer 

Registrar Helen Dillon, O.P. 

Acting Director ofM .Div. Program Robert Moosbrugger, O.M.I. 

Director of M.A. Program John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Director ofM.T.S. Program and Francis S. Tebbe, O.F.M. 
Continuing Education 

Degree Programs: 
M.TS. 

M.A. in Theology 
M.Div. 

M.Div. with Mission Specialization 
M.Div. with Word and Worship Specialization 



CMTHOUC 

theoijogical union 

5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60615 

(312)324-8000 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



An ecumenical Seminary related to the United Church of Christ. A style fostering rig* 
orous theological inquiry and development of students' own intellectual and professional 
integrity in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. The basic professional degree pro- 
gram is the three year Master of Divinity, but die Master of Arts in Religious Studies 
may be awarded at the end of the second year as a terminal master's degree. The post- 
M.Div. Doctor of Ministry is available full or part-time for students with experience in 
ministry. Joint programs with pastoral care institutions and a dual degree program with 
the School of Social Service Administration of the University of Chicago are available. 
The Ph.D. programs focus on Theology and the Human Sciences, Marriage and Family 
Therapy and Christian-Jewish Relations. 

Kenneth B. Smith 

Graydon F. Snyder 

Cheryl W.Miller 

W. Dow Edgerton 

Brenda Jones Watkins 

Richard D. Lewis 

Randall Vaughn 
Stephen J. Davidson 




5757 South University Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637 

(312) 752-5757 



President 

Academic Dean 

Registrar and Director of Academic Programmir)g 

Director of Field Education 

Dean of Student Life 

Director of Recruitment, Admissions, 

and Financial Aid 
Vice-President for Business Affairs 
Vice-President for Development 

Degree Programs: 

M.A. In Religious Studies 

M.Div. 

S.TM. 

D.Min. 

Ph.D. 



GARRETT-EV ANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Garrett- Evangelical is a graduate divinity school of the United Methodist Church. 
While the majority of the faculty and the students is affiliated with the school's denomi- 
national heritage, the seminary is ecumenical in religious and educational approaches. 
The curricula emphasize theory and practice; they include the institutional emphases on 
The Church and the Black Experience, Peace and Justice, and Women in Ministry. The 
basic programs lead to the Master of Divinity, Master of Christian Education or Master 
of Theological Studies degrees. The advanced professional program leads to the Doctor 
of Ministry degree, while the Joint Program with Northwestern University leads to the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

Neal F. Fisher 

Richard D. Tholin 

Douglas E. Wingeier 

Wolfgang Roth 

Adolf M. Hansen 

David L. Heetland 

Vera L. Watts 



President 

Dean and Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Dean of the Summer School 

Director of the Ph.D. Program 

Vice President for Administration 

Vice President for Development 

Re^trar 



Degree Programs: 
M.Div. 
M.C.E 
M.TS. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 
Ph.D. (joint program with N.U.) 




2121 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, IL 60201 

(312)866-3900 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 



Preparation for professional ministry in the church, advanced studies in ministry, aca- 
demic study of theology. The M.Div. curriculum features strong accent upon study of the 
traditions of the church and a comprehensive field work program, with special emphasis 
on cross-cultural ministry and global awareness. Opportunities offered for specialization 
in Hispanic Ministries, Ministry and Social Work, and Coordinated M.Div./Ph.D. (with 
the University of Chicago). 

President 

Dean 

Vice President for Administration and Finance 

Vice Presideru for Development 

Dean of Student L^efDirector of Admissions 
^^ -■■ J/l ^~ Director of Pastoral Studies 

^r mmm jfjA tR Director, Joint Hispanic Ministries Program 

^** B^^ - -*^ Aissociate Director 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Director of Doctor ofMirustry Program 
and Extension Education 

Director ofM.A. Program Kurt K. Hendel 

Regtstrar Patricia Bartley 



4-t^% 



<i. 




1100 East 55 th Street 

Chicago, IL 60615 

(312) 753-0700 



William E. Lesher 

Ralph W.Klein 

Joseph L. Rodrick 

Donovan J. Palmquist 

TBA 

Nancy Hess 

Daniel R. Rodriguez- Diaz 

Jose David Rodriquez 

TBA 

Robert L. Conrad 



Degree Programs: 

M.A. 

M.Div. 

Th.M./Th.D. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Mccormick theological seminary 

McCormick is a theological center for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It also wel- 
comes many students from outside this denomination. It focuses its resources on educa- 
tion for the ministry, emphasizing both pre-professional (M.A.T.S. &. M.Div.) and pro- 
fessional (D.Min.) studies. Its programs in Hispanic Studies, Korean- American 
Ministries, African- American Ministries, Women's Studies and Urban Ministry, its dual 
competency programs in Social Work and other fields, and its emphasis on internation- 
alization add to its other offerings. Students are encouraged to plan, with advice, their 
own courses of study. 

President 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Dean of the Facuky 
Dean of Master's Level Programs 
Dean of Doctoral Studies 
Director, Joint Hispanic Ministries Program 

Associate Director 
Director, Korean-American Ministries Center 
Director of Seminary Relations and Recruitment 

and Vocational Planning Officer 
Officer of Admissions & Registraiion 
Vice President for Seminary Operations 

& Relations 
Vice President for Finance and Development 

Degree Programs: 

M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div. 

M.Div./M.S.W. 

D.Min. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 



David Ramage, Jr. 
Robert C. Worley 

Robert G. Boling 

Lois Gehr Livezey 

Daniel R. Rodriguez- Diaz 

Jose David Rodriguez 

Howard Kang 

Janet M. DeVries 

Shirley S. Dudley 
Ruben R Armendariz 

H. Kris Ronnow 




5555 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637 

(312) 241-7800 



MEADVILLE/LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 



MeadvilleA-ombard is a small, independent school whose central mission and purpose is 
preparation for ministry, primarily for parish ministry within the societies of the 
Unitarian Universalist Association. Neither Unitarian Universalist membership nor 
intention to seek ordination for parish ministry is a requirement for enrollment. The 
academic program leading to the M.Div. or D.Min. degree is closely related to the 
Divinity School of the University of Chicago, with which MeadvilleA-ombard is affiliat- 
ed, and may include a University A.M. degree. 



5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60637 

(312)753-3195 



Dean and Chief Executive 

Business Manager 

Admissions Officer, Dean of Students 

Librarian 

Re^trar/Director for Stxident and Academic 

Services/Financial Aid Officer 
Development Officer 

Degree Programs: 
M.Div. 
D.Min. 



Spencer Lavan 

Paula Swain-Harmon 

Neil H. Shadle 

NeilW.Gerdes 

Cecelia E. Smith 

Elise Cade 



MUNDELEIN SEMINARY 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ST. MARY OF THE LAKE 



With roots in a charter granted over 130 years ago, Mundelein Seminary of the 
University of St. Mary of the Lake possesses the task of preparing candidates academi- 
cally, formationally and spiritually for the Roman Catholic priesthood. As a canonically 
erected Pontifical Theological Faculty, Mundelein Seminary of the University of St. 
Mary of the Lake is empowered to confer the Bachelor, Licentiate, and Doctoral degrees 
in Sacred Theology. While originally most of the students attending Mundelein 
Seminary came from the Archdiocese of Chicago, its alumni now include students from 
other dioceses in the State of Illinois and throughout the country, as well as members of 
various religious communities. 



President'Rector 

Academic Dean 

Registrar 

Dean of Formation 

Director of Finances 

Degree Programs: 
M.Div. 
S.TB. 
S.TL. 
D.Min. 



Gerald F. Kicanas 

Gorman G. Sullivan, O.Carm. 

Celia Wilson 

Thomas E. Hickey 

Richard Schroeder 




Mundelein, IL 60060 
(312) 566-6401 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



North Park Theological Seminary, founded in 1891, is die graduate school of theology 
of the Evangelical Covenant Church. It is a professional school designed to educate peo- 
ple for ministry, whether as pastors, missionaries, church educators or trained laity. The 
seminary is a community of professors and students gathered not only for the purpose of 
theological study, but for worship, fellowship and the deepening of the spiritual life. 
Further, the seminary includes in its purposes the continuing education of ministers. It 
sees itself as a servant of the Church of Jesus Christ, and particularly, of the Evangelical 
Covenant Church. 




NorthPark 
TheologicalSeminary 

3225 W. Foster Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60625 

(312)478-2696 



President 


David G. Homer 


Dean of the Seminary 
Dean of the Faculty 
Dean of Student Devehpmem 
Re^trar 


Robert K. Johnston 

Klyne R. Snodgrass 

Arthur A.R. Nelson 

Judith A. Zink 


Degree Programs: 
M.Div. 




M.A.R.E. 




M.A.TS. 





NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



The educational purpose of the Seminary is the graduate professional theological educa- 
tion of men and women for ministry. The study and application of the Scriptures is con- 
sidered foundational. The faculty promotes free discussion and inquiry in a community 
of scholars. Growth of the whole person is fostered in a caring community. The 
Seminary has an evangelical commitment, is related to the American Baptist Churches, 
U.S.A., welcomes students from all Christian traditions and encourages participation in 
ecumenical dialogue. 



President 

Interim Dean of the Seminary 

Vice President for Business Administration 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement 

Associate Dean 

Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Director of Field Seridces 

Director of Doctoral Studies 

Director of Hispanic Studies 

Degree Programs: 

M.A. in Christian Education 

M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Ian M. Chapman 

Eric H. Ohlmann 

David L. Nichols 

Theodore Y. Rodgers IV 

Eric H. Ohlmann 

Douglas R. Sharp 

William R. Nelson 

E. Alfred Jenkins 

Osvaldo L. Mottesi 



m 



^ri^orthern baptist 
theological semirxDry 

660 East Butterfield Road 

Lombard, IL 60148 

(312)620-2101 (President's Office) 

(312) 620-2103 (Dean's Office) 
(312) 620-2105 (Registrar's Office) 



SEABURY-WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Seabury- Western Seminary, one of the eleven accredited seminaries of the Episcopal 
Church, is a largely residential seminary committed to providing excellence in academic 
preparation for congregational leadership. Worship, offered three times a day, is central 
to community life. The student body reflects the breadth of Anglican tradition, drawing 
students from 25 or more states each year. Located just across the street from Garrett- 
Evangelical Seminary, the two schools have joined forces to form the United Library 
which provides an outstanding theological library of 271,000 volumes. Students study- 
ing at Seabury- Western experience the distinctive eclecticism that characterizes 
Anglicanism. 




President 

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

Associate Dean for Planning and Development 



trar 

Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 
M.T.S. 



Mark. S. Sisk 

William P. Haugaard 

David E. Gillingham 

Leonel L. Mitchell 



2122 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, IL 60201 

(312)328-9300 

TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL 



Trinity Evangelical Divinity School is maintained by the Evangelical Free Church of 
America to educate men and women for a world-wide Christian ministry as pastors, mis- 
sionaries, teachers, and lay-workers who are committed to God for a particular service 
for which they recognize a need for seminary studies. The Divinity School welcomes the 
opportunity of assisting students from all denominations and independent non-denomi- 
national churches who are seeking preparation for fruitful Christian life and ministry. 

President Kenneth M. Meyer 

Academic Dean and Vice President of Education Walter C. Kaiser, Jr. 

Vice President of Academic Administration Warren S. Benson 

Associate Academic Dean Barry J. Beitzel 

Vice President of Business Affairs Gary Erlandson 

Vice President of Student Affairs Joseph C. Hassey 
Vice President of Continuing Education and Extension Larry D. McCuUough 
Vice President <^ Irxstitutumd and Campus Development V. Eugene Goldy 

Director of Records James H. Terry 

DeanofStX4dents Charles S. Dake 

Dean of Women Patricia A. Velotta 

Director of Doctor of Education Ted W. Ward 

Director of Doctor of Philosophy Kenneth S . Kantzer 

Director of Doctor of Ministry and Doctor ofMissiology Timothy M. Warner 

Degree Programs: 

M.A. (eight areas) Ed.D. (4 years experience prerequisite) 

M.Div. D.Min. (3 years experience prerequisite) 

Th.M. D.Miss. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 

M.A.R. Ph.D (M.Div. prerequisite) 
M.R.E. 




TRINITY 

EVANGELICAL 

DIVINITY 

SCHOOL 

2065 Half Day Road 

Deerfteld, IL 60015 

(312)945-8800 



COMMON COUNCIL 

OF THE 

ASSOCIATION OF CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



Donald Senior, C.R, Vice-Chairperson 

Kenneth B. Smith 

Neal F. Fisher 

William E Lesher 

David Ramage, Jr. 

Spencer Lavan 

Gerald R Kicanas 

David G. Homer 

Ian M. Chapman 

Mark S. Sisk, Chairperson 

Kenneth M. Meyer 



Bethany Theological Seminary (BTS) 
Catholic Theological Union (CTU) 
Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS) 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (G-ETS) 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC) 
McCormick Theological Seminary (MTS) 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School (M/L) 
Mundelein Seminary (MS) 
North Park Theological Seminary (NPTS) 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary (NBTS) 
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary (S-NJCHTS) 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (TEDS) 



FACULTY AREA GROUPS 

(See final pages for biographical data.) 



OLD TESTAMENT 

Gleason Archer (TEDS) 
Barry Beitzel (TEDS) 
Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) 
Phyllis Bird (G-ETS) 
Robert Boling (MTS) 
Edward Campbell (MTS) 
Wesley Fuerst (LSTC) 
Victoria Garvey, R.S.M. (S-WTS) 
Fredrick Holmgren (NPTS) 
Leslie Hoppe, O.E M. (CTU) 
Walter Kaiser, Jr. (TEDS) 
Ralph Klein (LSTC) 
Andre LaCocque (CTS) 
Dennis Magary (TEDS) 
Claude Mariottini (NBTS) 
Robert Marshall (LSTC) 
SamirMassouh (TEDS- Vis.) 
Thomas McComiskey (TEDS) 
Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 
Walter Michel (LSTC) 
Peter Nash (G'ETS) 
Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) 
Eugene Roop (BTS) 
Wolfgang Roth (G'ETS) 
John Sailhamer (TEDS) 
Herman Schaalman (CTS - Adj.; 

G'ETS'Adj.) 
Robert Schoenstene (MS) 



Can-oU Stuhlmueller, C.R (CTU) 

NEW TESTAMENT 

David Aune (CTS -Adj.) 

Linda Belleville (NPTS) 

Barbara Bowe, R.S.CJ. (CTU - Adj.) 

Donald Carson (TEDS) 

Charles Cosgrove (NBTS) 

Frederick Danker (LSTC - Emeritus) 

Richard Gardner (BTS) 

Wayne Grudem (TEDS) 

Adolf Hansen (G'ETS) 

Murray Harris (TEDS) 

Warren Heard, Jr. (TEDS - Vis.) 

Sarah Henrich (LSTC) 

Earle Hilgert (MTS) 

Estella Boggs Homing (BTS) 

Robert Jewett(G'ETS) 

Edgar Krentz (LSTC) 

William Lane (NPTS- Vis.) 

Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU- Adj.; 

MS- Adj.) 
Walter Liefeld (TEDS) 
Wilhelm Linss (LSTC) 
John Lodge (MS) 
James Mcllhone (MS) 
Scot McKnight (TEDS) 
Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 
Margaret Mitchell (MTS) 



Douglas Moo (TEDS) 
Grant Osborne (TEDS) 
Carolyn Osiek,R.S.C.J. (CTU) 
Chang Hwan Park (MTS - Adj.) 
Eung'Chung Park (MTS - Adj.) 
Richard Pervo (S-WTS) 
Ricaro Pietrantonio (LSTC - Vis.) 
Barbara Reid.O.P (CTU) 
David Rhoads (LSTC) 
Eloise Rosenblatt, R.S.M. (CTU) 
David Scholer (NPTS) 
Donald Senior, C.P (CTU) 
Graydon Snyder (CTS) 
Klyne Snodgrass (NPTS) 
Richard Stegner (G-ETS) 
Sarah Tanzer (MTS) 
Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) 
Herold Weiss (NBTS - Affil.) 
Laurence Welborn (MTS) 
Douglas Wingeier (G-ETS) 

CHURCH HISTORY 

Philip Anderson (NPTS) 
Dorothy Bass (CTS) 
Dale Brown (BTS) 
Walter Cason(G'ETS) 
Andriy Freishyn-Chirovsky (CTU) 
Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M. (MS) 
David Daniels III (MTS) 
Donald Dayton (NBTS) 
Donald Durnbaugh (BTS) 
John Charles Godbey (M/L) 
Stephen Graham (NPTS) 
Dennis Groh (G-ETS) 
William Haugaard (S-WTS) 
Kurt Hendel (LSTC) 
Cynthia J iirisson (LSTC) 
William Kuntze (CTS ' Adj.) 
Jong Min Lee (MTS -Adj.) 
Clair McPherson (S-WTS - Adj.) 
Charles Meyer (MS) 
Larry Murphy (G-ETS) 
Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) 

» Thomas Nettles (TEDS) 
Eric Ohlmann (NBTS) 
Kad Olsson (NPTS) 
Daniel Rodriguez- Diaz (LSTC/MTS) 
i Paul Rorem (LSTC) 



Theodore Ross, S.J. (CTU- Adj.; MS- Adj.) 

James Scherer (LSTC) 

James Stein (G-ETS) 

Murray Wagner (BTS) 

John Woodbridge (TEDS) 

Martin Zielinski (MS) 

THEOLOGY 

Paula S. Datsko Barker (S-WTS) 

Robert Bertram (LSTC) 

Stephen Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) 

Carl Braaten (LSTC) 

Walter Brennan, O.S.M. (CTU - Adj.) 

Dale Brown (BTS) 

Harold Brown (TEDS) 

Ralph Burhoe (M/L - Emeritus) 

John Burkhart (MTS) 

Louis Cameli (MS) 

John Canary (MS) 

Anna Case- Winters (MTS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

Toinette Eugene (CTS) 

John Feinberg (TEDS) 

Paul Feinberg (TEDS) 

Bruce Fields (TEDS) 

Brian Fischer (MS) 

Neal Fisher (G-ETS) 

Langdon Gilkey (LSTC - Adj.) 

Warren Groff (BTS) 

Zachary Hayes, O.E M. (CTU) 

Philip Hefner (LSTC) 

Carl Henry (TEDS - Vis.) 

Nancy Hess (LSTC) 

Paul Holmer (NPTS -Vis.) 

Robert Johnston (NPTS) 

James Jones (NBTS - Affil.) 

Kenneth Kantzer (TEDS) 

Spencer La van (M/L) 

Leo Lefebure (MS) 

Perry LeFevre (CTS) 

John Linnan, C.S.V (CTU) 

Fumitaka Matsuoka (BTS) 

MelanieMay(BTS-Adj.) 

Charles Meyer (MS) 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 

R Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

Thomas Parker (MTS) 

Albert Pero, Jr. (LSTC) 



Jamie Phelps, O.R (CTU) 

Gene Reeves (MA-) 

Jos6 David Rodriguez (LSTC/MTS) 

Rosemary Ruedier (G-ETS) 

Robert Schreiter, C.PRS. (CTU) 

Douglas Sharp (NBTS) 

John Shea (MS) 

W. Taylor Stevenson (S-WTS) 

Gorman Sullivan, O.Carm. (MS) 

Susan Thistlethwaite (GTS) 

Kevin Vanhoozer (TEDS) 

Murray Wagner (BTS) 

Andrew Wallace (MTS - Adj.) 

C.JohnWeborg(NPTS) 

James Will (G-ETS) 

Henry Young (G-ETS) 

ETHICS 

Patrick Boyle, SJ. (MS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

Michael Eric Dyson (CTS) 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. (CTU) 

Gerald Forshey (G-ETS - Adj.) 

Heidi Hadsell (MTS) 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 

Rosemary Keller (G-ETS) 

Jerome Listecki (MS) 

Lois Gehr Livezey (MTS) 

Fumitaka Matsuoka (BTS) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Thomas Nairn, O.R M. (CTU) 

E Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) 

W Widick Schroeder (CTS) 

Martha Scott (G-ETS - Adj.) 

Timothy Sedgwick (S-WTS) 

Richard Tholin(G'ETS) 

Paul Wadell, C.R (CTU) 

Murray Wagner (BTS) 

WORLD MISSION 

Raymond Bakke (NBTS - Affil.) 
Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) 
Dale Brown (BTS) 
Walter Cason(G-ETS) 
Robert Coleman (TEDS) 



William Danker (LSTC - Emeritus) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. (CTU) 

Andiony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) 

Byron Haines (MTS - Adj.) 

David Hesselgrave (TEDS) 

Yoshiro Ishida (LSTC) 

John Kaserow, M.M. (CTU) 

Michael Kirwen, M.M. (CTU) 

David Lindberg (LSTC) 

Fumitaka Matsuoka (BTS) 

MelanieMay(BTS'Adj.) 

Harold Nedand (TEDS - Vis.) 

Edward Nyhus (LSTC - Vis.) 

John Nyquist (TEDS) 

Ana Maria Pineda, S.M. (CTU) 

Edward Rommen (TEDS) 

James Scherer (LSTC) 

William Taylor (TEDS - Vis.) 

Ruth Tucker (TEDS - Vis.) 

DavidVikner (LSTC -Adj.) 

Timothy Warner (TEDS) 

Wayne Weld (NPTS) 

MINISTRY: ITS NATURE 
AND PRACTICE 

Ruben Armendariz (MTS) 

Raymond Bakke (NBTS - Affil.) 

Deborah Block (MTS - Adj.) 

Richard Carlson (NPTS) 

Robert Craig (MTS) 

Jose Abraham De Jesus (MTS - Adj.) 

Carl Dudley (MTS) 

W Dow Edgerton (CTS) 

Hugh Halverstadt (MTS) 

James Hargleroad (MTS - Adj.) 

Nancy Hess (LSTC) 

William Johnstone (MTS - Adj.) 

Howard Kang (MTS -Adj.) 

Gerald Kicanas (MS) 

Jane Koonce (NPTS -Adj.) 

Darryl Larson (NPTS) 

Robert Larson (NPTS - Adj.) 

John Lozano, C.M.E (CTU) 

Isidro Lucas (CTU) 

Thomas McGonigle, O.R (CTU) 

Robert Moosbnjgger, O.M.L (CTU) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Arthur Nelson (NPTS) 



10 



Clarence Newsome (NPTS - Vis.) 
James Persson (NPTS - Adj.) 
David Ramage, Jr. (MTS) 
Jerold Reed (NPTS) 
DonRichter(BTS) 
Jos6 David Rodriguez (LSTC/MTS) 
Lilian Ross (S'NVTS) 
Norman Shawchuck (MTS) 
Clinton Stockwell 

(CrS/LSTC/MTS'Adj.) 
Robert Tutde, Jr. (G'ETS) 
Bennie Whiten (CTS - Adj.) 
Charles Winters (S-WTS) 
Richard Wojcik (MS) 
Robert Worley (MTS) 
Walter Wright (NPTS - Vis.) 

PASTORAL CARE 

James Alsdurf (NPTS - Adj.) 

Herbert Anderson (CPU) 

James Ashbrook (G-ETS) 

Homer Ashby, Jr. (MTS) 

Jeremiah Boland (MS) 

David Dillon (TEDS) 

Kevin Feeney (MS) 

Geraldine Flynn (MS) 

Peggy Garrison (BTS) 

Edwin Hallsten, Jr. (NPTS) 

Thomas Hickey (MS) 

John Hinkle (G-ETS) 

Raymond Holtz (MS) 

Everett Jackson (NPTS) 

Emmajustes (NBTS) 

HaddonKlingberg (NPTS - Adj.) 

Spencer La van (MA-) 

Francis Lordemann (MS) 

Al Masterton (TEDS) 

Marie McCarthy, S.R (CPU) 

David McKay (TEDS -Vis.) 

Bonnie Miller-McLemore (CTS) 

Robert Moore (CTS) 

Michael Pearson (TEDS - Vis.) 

George Polk (CIS -Adj.) 

Lallene Rector (G-ETS) 

Daniel Schipani (LSTC/MTS - Adj.) 

William Secor, Jr. (TEDS) 

Steve Shim (MTS -Adj.) 

Paul Swanson (LSTC) 



Sharon Tliomton (CTS - Adj.) 
PaulWachdorf(MS) 
Edward Wimberly (G-ETS) 
Patty Woemer (MTS) 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

Richard Carlson (NPTS) 
John Cassel (BTS) 
Calvin Hanson (TEDS) 
David Lindberg (LSTC) 
Carl Linde (TEDS) 
Milo Lundell (TEDS) 
Deborah Mullen (MTS) 
William Nelson (NBTS) 
Neil Shadle (M/L) 
Norman Shawchuck (MTS) 
John Szura,O.S.A. (CPU) 

WORSHIP AND PREACHING 

Mark Bangert (LSTC) 

Richard Bodey (TEDS) 

John Buchanan (MTS - Adj.) 

Michael BuUmore (TEDS - Vis.) 

Kathleen Cannon, O.P (CPU) 

Ian Chapman (NBTS) 

Donald Chatfield (G-ETS) 

Royce Eckhardt (NPTS - Adj.) 

O. C.Edwards, Jr. (S-WTS) 

Nancy Faus (BTS) 

Carroll Felton, Jr. (G-ETS - Adj.) 

Edward Foley, O.E M. Cap. (CPU) 

Mark Francis, CS.V (CPU) 

KatherineGriffis (MTS - Adj.) 

J. Robert Hjelm (NPTS) 

Mark Howe (S-WTS) 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CPU) 

WillardJabusch(MS) 

Dai Kyun Kim (MTS - Adj.) 

David Larsen (TEDS) 

Paul Manz (LSTC) 

Leonel Mitchell (S-WTS) 

Ardiur Nelson (NPTS) 

Morris Niedenthal (LSTC) 

Theodore Olsen (TEDS) 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.E M. (CPU) 

Jay Rochelle (LSTC) 

Paul Satre (TEDS -Vis.) 



11 



Jeannette Scholer (MTS - Adj.] 
Daniel Siwek (MS) 
James Speer (TEDS) 
Hycel Taylor (BTS- Adj.) 
Frank Thomas (MTS - Adj.) 
DonWardlaw(MTS) 
C.JohnWeborg(NPTS) 
Edward Wimberly (G-ETS) 
Bartholomew Winters (MS) 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Frances Anderson (NPTS) 
Deidre Banks (NPTS- Adj.) 
Warren Benson (TEDS) 
Jean Bozeman (LSTC) 
Elizabeth Caldwell (MTS) 
Linda Cannell (TEDS) 
Robert Conrad (LSTC) 
Perry Downs (TEDS) 
Dorothy Jean Furnish (G-ETS - 
Margaret Gooding (M/L - Vis.) 
E.Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) 



Adj.) 



Ray Johnston (NPTS - Adj.) 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) 

Taylor McConnell (G-ETS - Adj. 

Wilda Morris (NBTS) 

William Myers (CTS) 

Betty Nelson (NPTS -Adj.) 

David Owens (CTS - Adj.) 

DonRichter(BTS) 

Daniel Schipani (NBTS - Adj.) 

Charles Sell (TEDS) 

Mark Senter (TEDS) 

Jack Seymour (G-ETS) 

Francis Tebbe, O.E M. (CTU) 

Linda Vogel(G'ETS) 

Ted Ward (TEDS) 

Daniel Webster (TEDS - Vis.) 

Douglas Wingeier (G-ETS) 

CANON LAW 

John Dolciamore (MS) 
John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) 



12 



SUBCLUSTERS AND COOPERATIVE ACTIVITIES 

CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE (CTl) 

The Chicago Theological Institute (CTI) was organized by five theological schools in 
1974 for educational and ecumenical purposes: Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary, North Park Theological Seminary, Seabury- Western Theological Seminary, 
Mundelein Seminary and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

The schools are located on dhe north side of the greater Chicago area, with one in 
Chicago, two on contiguous campuses in Evanston adjacent to Northwestern University, 
one in Deerfield and one in Mundelein. 

The activities of the CTI are under the direction of a Board of Directors whose offi- 
cers are elected annually. From its beginning the CTI has emphasized the importance of 
student representation on its boards and committees. 

The CTI sponsors three events annually. In the fall an academic, ecumenical program 
is held for students and faculty members of its five schools. This fall event is planned to 
commemorate a significant moment in the history of Christian theological or spiritual 
development, for example, the spiritual leadership of John Calvin and Ignatius of Loyola 
(1986) and "American Civil Religion: A 200- Year Experiment" (1987). 

In January each member school of CTI observes the Week of Prayer for Christian 
Unity through activities appropriate to its own tradition. Exchange of pulpit speakers is 
one practice that has proven to be an enrichment of the schools at this time. 

The Spring Seminar offered annually is a three-hour course which has addressed vari- 
ous theological themes in a variety of forms. In recent years the seminar has focused on 
the diversity in which Christians of many traditions understand "Life in the Spirit." In 
its present format the seminar includes two overnight, intensive retreat experiences on 
the campus of Mundelein Seminary. Registration for the seminar is limited in number. A 
minimal fee is requested of student participants. Further information regarding the "Life 
in the Spirit" Seminar can be obtained from Professor John Weborg, Coordinator 
(NPTS); Phone: (312) 478-2696 or from Sister Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M., CTI 
Executive Secretary (MS); Phone: (312) 566-6401. 

THE COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC COOPERATION IN HYDE PARK (CAC) 

The five ACTS schools located in Hyde Park (Catholic Theological Union, Chicago 
Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick 
Theological Seminary, and Meadville/Lombard Theological School) have formed a 
Committee on Academic Cooperation (CAC), consisting of the chief academic officers. 
The chief executive officers of the cooperating institutions serve as an advisory board to 
the CAC, especially in those areas relating to institutional planning. 

The purposes of the CAC are to: ( 1 ) promote cooperation among the academic pro- 
grams of its members institutions; (2) foster cooperation and scholarship among its fac- 
ulties in both disciplinary groupings and interdisciplinary endeavors; (3) develop coop- 
eration in areas supportive of academic programs, especially in student services; and (4) 
aid in communication and planning among the member institutions. 

The CAC seeks ways in which the exchange of information can be deepened into 
forms of academic sharing closer than those made possible by the ACTS structure. The 
Divinity School of the University of Chicago maintains a consultative relationship with 
die CAC. 

The CAC retains an Administrator, Ms. Eva Salmons, to aid in communication and 



13 



the implementation of its projects. The CAC office is located at CTS; Phone: (312) 
752-5757. 

THE COMMITTEE ON INTERINSTITUTIONAL COOPERATION (CIC) 

The Committee on Interinstitutional Cooperation (CIC) was established in 1975 by 
Bethany Theological Seminary and Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, which are 
located on adjacent campuses in west suburban Oak Brook and Lombard. The CIC is 
composed of the presidents, the deans and the business managers of BTS and NBTS, 
and the director of the Seminary Library, which serves both schools. 

The CIC engages in joint planning and discussion related to various areas of coopera- 
tion and common interests such as library, bookstore, student housing, class scheduling, 
curriculum planning and course offerings, and faculty professional growth events. 

WORLD MISSION INSTITUTE (WMl) 

The World Mission Institute (WMI) is an annual conference, sponsored since 1970 
by member schools of ACTS, along with several other educational or mission organiza- 
tions. Each year outstanding international speakers and resource persons deal with a sig- 
nificant aspect of Christian world mission. The 1989 WMI focused on the theme: 
Mission in a Hungry World." The 1990 WMI is scheduled for April 26-28, 1990, and 
the topic will be "Religious Plurality and Christian Mission." 

All students and faculty of ACTS schools are invited to participate in the WMI with- 
out registration charges. Inquiries regarding WMI should be addressed to: WMI 
Coordinator, c/o Center for Global Mission, 1100 East 55th Street, Chicago, IL 60615; 
Phone:(312)753-0672. 

ACTS DOCTOR OF MINISTRY IN PREACHING 

A Doctor of Ministry in Preaching is offered by a sub-cluster of ACTS schools as an 
accepted program of the Association. The program is ecumenical in nature and cross- 
disciplinary in its design. The curriculum includes three summer intensives in Chicago, 
two parish courses and a final thesis. Each student's program is tailored to his or her 
needs in consultation with an advisory committee and a faculty /student colloquy. 
Interested persons should inquire through one of the following ACTS schools: Chicago 
Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick 
Theological Seminary, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary and Seabury- Western 
Theological Seminary. 

JOINT HISPANIC MINISTRIES PROGRAM 

The Hispanic Ministries Program, administered jointly by McCormick Theological 
Seminary and the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, offers a concentration with- 
in the course of study of the regular M.Div. and M.A.T.S. degrees. The purpose of the 
program is to prepare Hispanics and other bilingual persons to serve effectively in 
Hispanic communities. The program offers courses in all fields of the seminary curricu- 
lum and in the practice of ministry in local Hispanic settings. 

In addition to their own faculty, MTS and LSTC invite outstanding Hispanic theolo- 
gians and ministerial practitioners to their campuses to expand the resources available 
and to reinforce the identity of the Hispanic Ministries Program. 



14 



JOINT BLACK MINISTRIES PROGRAM 

In 1989, the ACTS schools in Hyde Park will be developing a Joint Black Ministries 
Program. The purpose of this program will be to develop skilled, theologically trained 
leadership for Black churches. The program will be comprised of courses and educational 
experiences which focus on developing effective ministries for Black churches. The 
courses and other educational experiences will be incorporated into a student's regular 
curriculum at the school where he or she is enrolled. All students in the ACTS schools 
are welcome to participate in any or all of the Black Ministries Program. 

ACTS INTERNATIONAL STUDY OPPORTUNITIES 

Chicago- Zimbabwe Exchange Agreement. An agreement reached in 1986 betwen 
the Association of Chicago Theological Schools and the Department of Religious 
Studies, Classics, and Philosophy of the University of Zimbabwe provides the opportuni- 
ty for students in ACTS member institutions to spend six months studying in Zimbabwe 
as part of their theological education. Courses taken at the University in biblical, histor- 
ical, and theological studies, as well as the local religious and social context, may be 
counted for credit (usually as electives), according to the curricular policies of the stu- 
dent's home institution. The period of time spent in Zimbabwe is from about March 15 
to September 1, covering the first two terms of the University's academic year. 

As a newly independent nation, Zimbabwe plays a leading role in the political and 
economic life of southern Africa. It provides a very favorable context for U.S. students 
seeking experience of African culture, theology, and church life, English is the language 
of instruction. 

Limited financial assistance is available for participation in the program; however, an 
interested student should be prepared to meet a portion of the costs. For further informa- 
tion, contact Dr. Yoshiro Ishida, LSTC Center for Global Mission; Phone: (312) 753- 
0673. 

Israel Study Programs. G-ETS offers two courses: "Ancient Excavation and 
Contemporary Cooperation" in Sepphoris, Lower Galilee, June and July, 1989, and 
"Biblical Roots and Human Rights" in Israel, January, 1990. For more information con- 
tact Dean Richard Tholin, G-ETS; Phone: (312) 866-3904. TEDS offers a course in 
Israel, March 16-April 7, 1990. For more information contact faculty host, Professor 
Barry Beitzel, TEDS; Phone: (312) 945-8800. CTU offers a program in Israel the last 
three weeks of the spring quarter in alternate years. The next program is scheduled for 
1991. For more information, contact Joann Gehling, CTU; Phone: (312) 324-8000. 

Middle East. MTS offers a traveling seminar 1-435 "Christianity in the Middle East" 
for three weeks in the Winter Quarter, 1990. Course description is found in World 
Mission Studies, Winter. For further information contact Dean Robert Worley; Phone: 
(312)241-7800. 

Nigeria. BTS is offering a travel seminar M-573 "Faith Explorations in a Cross- 
Cultural Setting: Nigeria" from December 28, 1989 to January 14, 1990. Course descrip- 
tion is listed in World Mission Studies, Winter. For further information, contact Dean 
Fumitaka Matsuoka; Phone: (312) 620-2205. 

Nairobi, Kenya. CTU is cosponsoring with the MaryknoU Fathers and Brothers a 
pilot program of accredited African Studies. Courses will be taught at Tangaza College, 



15 



Nairobi. For information, contact the program director, Michael C. Kerwen, CTU; 
Phone:(312)324-8000. 

Guatemala and Nicaragua. G-ETS offers a travel study program in January, 1990: 
"Liberation Theology and Base Communities." For more information contact Dean 
Richard Tholin, G-ETS; Phone: (312) 866-3904. 

FEMINIST THEOLOGICAL COALITION (FTC) 

In the fall of 1980 women from area seminaries and in ministry from around the 
Chicago area met to discuss the need for an intentional focus on feminist scholarship in 
the seminaries. Out of this meeting a Cluster Seminaries Women's Caucus formed, 
which established the Feminist Theological Coalition (FTC). The FTC exists to 
encourage women seminarians who want to develop ecumenical relationships and to 
work toward the full integration of feminist scholarship in seminary curricula. Currently, 
faculty women meet monthly for study and support. Women seminarians meet for wor- 
ship, fellowship and conference planning. During the academic year, both groups meet 
together on occasion for study and fellowship. For information, contact women's con- 
cerns groups in the seminaries. 

In conjunction with the Community Renewal Society and area seminaries, the FTC 
offers a summer internship program in urban ministry for women seminarians, which 
includes the participation of women faculty from various ACTS schools. For details, 
contact Gretchen Leppke; Phone: (312) 475-4251. 

CHICAGO AREA STUDENTS OF THEOLOGY (CAST) 

Chicago Area Students of Theology (CAST) is a student organization, made up of 
students of the ACTS schools, which seeks to facilitate interfaith dialogue between stu- 
dents in ACTS. Members pay quarterly dues which are used to underwrite CAST activi- 
ties. 

Participation in CAST encourages fellowship and sharing of self-understanding of dif- 
ferent traditions and the implications of these on daily life. 

CAST also sponsors a newsletter to facilitate the communication of student events 
and to provide a forum for student concerns. 

NON^CREDIT LANGUAGE COURSES 

Non-credit courses in Spanish, French, German and Latin, as warranted by student 
interest, are available to graduate students in the Chicago area through a program 
administered by the Committee on Academic Cooperation in Hyde Park. The aim of 
the courses is to assist students to achieve facility in reading the respective languages. 
Such facility is required for certain degree programs, especially those beyond the M.Div. 
level. Moderate fees are charged. For further information, contact the CAC office at 
CTS; Phone: (312) 752-5757. 



16 



COOPERATING INSTITUTIONS 



CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE 
(CASIRAS) 

This is an independent incorporated institution located in Hyde Park which has 
developed an effective working relationship with neighboring theological schools. The 
Director is Ralph Wendell Burhoe (Emeritus, M/L), recipient of the Templeton Award. 
CASIRAS' activities are chiefly in cooperation with the Chicago Center for Religion 
and Science (CCRS) at LSTC, of which it is a co-founder. For information about 
CCRS, see the 1988-90 catalog of LSTC, pp. 95-96. 

CASIRAS and CCRS seek to achieve a greater integration between the scientific 
and religious models or images concerning the nature and destiny of humans. 
Dimensions of CASIRAS' work include seminars, courses, conferences, symposia and 
guided research as well as co- sponsorship of Zy gon: Journal of Reli^n and Science. In 
cooperation with LSTC and M/L, CASIRAS offers the advanced Seminar in Religion 
and Science (T-672) each year, usually in the spring quarter. 

For further information contact Professor Philip Hefner (LSTC); Phone: (312) 753- 
0764. 



CENTRO PARA DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO Y LIDERATO 

3405 West North Avenue President: Jorge L. Morales 

Chicago, IL 60647 

(312)489-4533 

In 1981 a group representative of various community organizations, churches, judica- 
tories, and seminaries, concerned about the obstacles facing the Latino community in 
the areas of leadership development and community empowerment sponsored and creat- 
ed El Centro de Estudios Teologicos. In 1986 as the programs of El Centro were expand- 
ed in accordance to the needs of the sponsoring institutions and newly created networks 
of organizations and churches, the community Board of Directors of El Centro decided 
to change the name of the organization to Centro Para DesarroUo Comunitario y 
Liderato (The Center for Community and Leadership Development) and to restructure 
the Board to be more representative of the constituency being served. This change gave 
more control to the Latino community and El Centro's constituency while retaining 
necessary judicatory and seminary representation. 

El Centro Para DesarroUo Comunitario y Liderato is charged with programmatic 
responsibility in the areas of: (1) consulting and assisting grassroot organizations and 
churches with effective methodologies for the development of leadership and of institu- 
tional and community structures; (2) training both community leaders and pastors in 
institutional development and strategies for resolving community issues; (3) creating 
networks of organizations for the planning and implementation of programs designed to 
meet specific needs of local poor and oppressed communities; and (4) educating leader- 
ship in cooperation with the Ecumenical Hispanic Ministries Program of ACTS, utiliz- 
ing their resources and those of other institutions participating in die program. 



17 



CHICAGO CENTER FOR PUBLIC MINISTRY (CCPM) 

1 100 East 55th Street Director: Clinton E. Stockwell 

LSTC' Room 331 

Chicago, IL 60615 

(312) 753-0756; (312) 427-4830 

The Chicago Center for Public Ministry is an ecumenical cooperative program of 
Chicago Theological Seminary, Community Renewal Society, Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago and McCormick Theological Seminary. It provides practical edu- 
cation with respect to city communities, systems and issues for clergy and laity, and 
courses in public ministry for seminary students. 

During the 1989-90 academic year, CCPM will offer a variety of courses in public 
ministry, designed to develop concepts, perspectives, strategies, skills and models of pub- 
lic ministry. Course themes include community organization, socially responsible invest- 
ment, leadership development, prison ministry, political participation, approaches to 
public ministry, and an introduction to public ministry. Each course is listed in the 
course descriptions of this catalog, designated CCPM, followed by the initials of the host 
theological school. 

In the spring of 1990, CCPM will sponsor a Public Ministry Quarterly Intensive 
(PMQI), focusing on the issue of the health care crisis. Subsequent PMQI's will address 
issues such as housing, employment, and women and the city. Full course modules will 
be offered on site and connected with the theme of the quarter. These courses will 
include site visits, field placements, and small groups in designated community contexts. 
Up to four units of credit may be earned. 

Other CCPM sponsored programs include a ten-week summer quarter internship/field 
education program, "Public Ministry in the City." In 1990 this program will feature the 
development of a network of "learning communities," clusters of placement sites in 
selected neighborhoods such as Uptown, New Town, Humboldt Park, South Shore and 
Rogers Park. Students will be clustered in these communities under the supervision of a 
mentor-supervisor. The summer program integrates academic reflection, small group 
analysis, and field education under a qualified supervisor. Field placements are in urban 
congregations, social agencies or community organizations. This program meets the 
requirements of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) for the sponsoring theological 
schools. 

The Center also cosponsors the program "Women, Ministry and the City" with the 
Women and Faith Resource Center. This program, directed by Gretchen Leppke, is a 
six-week internship program for women seminarians, with placements in city churches 
served by women pastors. 

In addition to these programs, CCPM hosts seminars, forums and other specialized 
opportunities in public ministry. CCPM is developing a field placement program for the- 
ological students and provides resources and information for congregations and agencies 
involved in ministry of advocacy in the public realm. For more information, contact the 
Director. 

CCPM courses are open to students from all ACTS schools, but students from institu- 
tions other than the member schools (CTS, LSTC and MTS) are responsible to arrange 
details of tuition payment through their seminary dean. 



18 



THE INSTITUTE ON THE CHURCH IN URBAN-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY 
(ICUIS) 

5700 South Woodlawn Avenue Executive Director: John Montgomery 

Chicago, IL 60637 

(312)643-7111 

ICUIS is an ecumenical agency which identifies and documents urban mission and 
social justice projects throughout the United States. It facilitates contact and communi- 
cation among local congregations engaged in urban ministries so they can learn from 
each other, collaborate in their work, and help initiate similar ministries in other 
churches and communities. 

ICUIS was founded in 1944 as the Presbyterian Institute on Industrial Relations and 
was affiliated with McCormick Theological Seminary. It has since become interdenomi- 
national and cooperates with Chicago area seminaries. The ICUIS files cover forty years 
of urban mission history in the USA and abroad, and are accessible to the ACTS com- 
munity. 

The priorities of ICUIS include: (1) research profiles on effective urban ministries, 
(2) conferences on issues like community organizing and community economic develop- 
ment, (3) a summer urban ministry training program, called "Revitalizing the Urban 
Church," (4) a quarterly national newsletter Metro-Ministry News, and (5) compiling 
bibliographies and profiles of urban ministry. 

ICUIS publishes workbooks on Justice Ministries in the areas of hunger, homelessness, 
joblessness, and church-based community organizing, and does research on peace and 
justice issues. 

Internships and field placements are available for seminary students at the ICUIS 
office. 

SEMINARY CONSORTIUM EOR URBAN PASTORAL EDUCATION 
(SCUPE) 

30 West Chicago Avenue Director: David J. Frenchak 

Chicago, IL 60610 

(312)944-2153 

The Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education provides specific programs of 
study in the area of urban pastoral education. SCUPE works cooperatively with Chicago 
area churches and community agencies and is committed to the development of compe- 
tent and creative leaders who both understand and can work with the realities of power, 
poverty and pluralism found in cities. 

For students interested in exploring urban ministry as a vocation, SCUPE provides a 
one year intensive program of urban pastoral education that is designed to fit into the 
core curriculum of a Master of Divinity degree. Through an integrated educational struc- 
ture of curriculum, church/agency internship and small group process, SCUPE students 
live, work and study in the city, developing both professional and personal skills. 
Representative courses include "Transforming Urban Systems," "The Black Church in 
an Urban Setting" and "Biblical Theology of the City." 

Students not able to take the full year program but wanting part of their theological 
education to be focused on the context of the city may register for one quarter of urban 
ministry courses or may enroll in particular courses throughout the academic year. Fall 
quarter courses focus on understanding the city and the church in the city. Winter quar- 



19 



ter focuses on developing skills for ministry in the city. Spring quarter courses are 
designed to address the future development of the church and the city through strategies 
and planning for ministry in the city. Courses offered by the Seminary Consortium dur- 
ing die 1989-90 academic year are listed in the course descriptions in this catalog under 
the appropriate headings with a SCUPE prefix. 

Students from ACTS schools diat are members of SCUPE (NPTS and NBTS) 
receive both academic and field education credit for the SCUPE program. Students from 
other ACTS schools are responsible to arrange details of accreditation and tuition pay- 
ment through their seminary dean. 

For further information about SCUPE, contact Carol Ann McGibbon, Program 
Director; Phone: (312) 944-2153. 

SPERTUS COLLEGE OF JUDAICA (SCJ) 

618 South Michigan Avenue President: Howard A. Sulkin 

Chicago, IL 60605 Vice-President for Academic Affairs: Byron Sherwin 

(312)922-9012 

Established in 1925, Spertus College of Judaica, a liberal arts institution, located in 
the Chicago Loop, offering undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Jewish and 
Hebrew studies, is the largest non-rabbinic training institution of higher Jewish learning 
in the Midwest. In addition to offering degree programs in Jewish studies, Spertus 
College of Judaica seeks to provide adult continuing education in Jewish studies for the 
Chicago community at large and to be a vibrant cultural resource center for Judaic 
learning and activities in Chicago and the Midwest. 

An agreement between Spertus College of Judaica and the Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools was signed in 1978 to provide for cross-registration of students and 
library access. Various courses have been taught on ACTS campuses as well. Spertus 
courses are open for cross-registration for students of all ACTS schools, but special con- 
siderations apply. Because precedures for cross-registration, acceptance of courses for 
credit and modes of payment may differ in individual schools, students are responsible to 
determine what particulars apply at their own schools. 

For further information about all the courses and programs of Spertus College of 
Judaica, contact the Department of Admissions and Student Services. 



20 



LIBRARY RESOURCES 



The combined library resources of the ACTS schools, comprising over 1.3 million 
volumes of books and about 5,000 cunrently received periodical subscriptions, represent 
one of the largest collections among the theological consortia of the nation. Nine 
libraries serve the twelve ACTS schools. Locations and hours of the libraries are given 
on the following page. Students and faculty of the member schools have borrowing priv- 
ileges at all of the libraries, but must abide by the circulation policies of each library. 
The Library Council and the Task Force on Collection Development further the cooper- 
ative endeavors of the libraries of ACTS. 

THE LIBRARY COUNCIL 

The Library Council was formed in July, 1983 by the following libraries: Catholic 
Theological Union Library, Chicago Theological Seminary Library, Jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library (LSTC and MTS), Meadville/Lombard Theological School Library, 
North Park Theological Seminary Library, The Seminary Library (BTS and NETS), 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School Library and The United Library (G-ETS and 
S-WTS). 

The Library Council operates a courier service among its members to facilitate the 
loan of books and periodicals. Users may request materials from other member libraries 
which will be sent through the courier. The courier's schedule is three times a week dur- 
ing the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters and once a week during quarter breaks and the 
summer. 

The Library Council has published a brochure available at all of its member libraries 
describing the individual strengths and special collections of its members and detailing 
the services of each library. 

TASK FORCE ON COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT 

All of the libraries of the ACTS schools are members of this task force which meets 
regularly to discuss cooperative collection development and is presendy working on a 
proposal for retrospective conversion. The Billy Graham Center Library and The 
University of Chicago Library are also members of this task force. 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES 

In addition to the resources in the libraries of the ACTS schools, the resources of the 
Chicago Area Theological Library Association (CATLA) are available to the faculty 
and students of member schools. Borrowing from CATLA libraries is governed by the 
ALA standard interlibrary loan code. 

The Ecumenical Parish Resource Center (EPRC), administered by the Jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library and located at LSTC, provides a variety of current resources for use 
in church programs. The Center's resources include more than fifty religious education 
curricula; a special collection of materials pertaining to the various functions of the con- 
gregation, including worship, stewardship, church organizations, education and simula- 
tion games. 



21 



LIBRARIES OF THE MEMBER SEMINARIES OF ACTS 

In the following listing the library location is given only in the instance of a joint 
library. Hours are given for regular academic sessions. 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
NORTHERN BAPTIST 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The Seminary Library 

BTS Campus 

620-2214 

Monday-Thursday 7:45 A.M. - 10:30 P.M. 

Friday 7:45 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Saturday 9:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 3:00 P.M. - 7:00 P.M. 

CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
The Library 
324-8000, Ext. 22 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

Friday 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

Saturday 12:00 M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 5:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
Hammond Library 
752-5757, Ext. 25 

Monday-Thursday 8:30 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 
Friday 8:30 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. 

Sunday 7:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

GARRETT-EVANGELICAL 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
SEABURY'WESTERN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The United Library 

Both Campuses 

866-3909, 866-3899 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

Friday 8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Saturday 2:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 7:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M. 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 

AT CHICAGO 
McCORMlCK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
SOCIETY OE JESUS: CHICAGO PROVINCE 

Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library 

LSTC Campus 

753-0739 

Monday-Thursday 8:30 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

Friday-Saturday 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

Sunday 3:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M. 



MEADVILLE/LOMBARD 
THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 
The Library 
753-3196 
Monday-Friday 9:00 A.M. 



MUNDELEIN SEMINARY 
The Library 
566-6401, Ext. 50 
Monday-Friday 8:00 A.M. 



5:00 P.M. 



4:30 P.M. 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Consolidated Libraries, North Park 
College and Theological Seminary 
Mellander Library 
583-2700, Ext. 5285 
Monday-Thursday 8:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. 
Friday 8:00 A.M. -10:00 P.M. 

Saturday 10:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 1:00 P.M. - 12:00 P.M. 

TRINITY EVANGELICAL 
DIVINITY SCHOOL 
Rolfing Memorial Library 
945-8800, Ext. 317 
Evenings and Saturdays, 945-8808 
Monday-Friday 7:30 A.M. - 11:30 P.M. 
Saturday 8:30 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 



22 



ACADEMIC CALENDARS 



All ACTS schools have three quarters of instruction each academic year, although 
they do not use a common calendar. BTS, CTU, CTS, LSTC, MTS, M/L and NBTS use 
calendars which closely parallel the calendar of the University of Chicago. G-ETS and 
S'WTS follow a common calendar, which closely parallels the calendar of Northwestern 
University. Essential dates are given below. 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 
1989-90 



1990-91 





FALL 




September 21-22 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 20-21 


September 25 


Classes Begin 


September 24 


November 13-15 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 12-14 


November 22-24 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 22-25 


December 8 


Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 


December 7 


January 2 


Intensive and Quarter Classes Begin 


January 7 


January 19 


Intensive Ends 


January 25 


January 22 


Regular Quarter Begins 


January 28 


February 19-21 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


Febmary 25-27 


March 16 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 22 


March 26 


Classes Begin 


April 1 


April 13 


Good Friday Recess 


(During Spring Recess) 


May 22-23 


Pre- Registration for Summer Quarter 


May 27-29 


June 1 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June? 


^THOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION? 




1989-90 


FALL 


1990-91 


September 27 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


TBA 


October 2 


Classes Begin 




November 14-15 


Registration for Winter Quarter 




November 23-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 




December 15 


Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 




January 3 


Classes Begin 




February 20-21 


Registration for Spring Quarter 




March 16 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 




March 26 


Classes Begin 




April 12-16 


Easter Recess 




May 15-16 


Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 




June 1 


Spring Quarter Ends 





23 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 
1989-90 



1990-91 





FALL 




September 25 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 24 


October 2 


Classes Begin 


October 1 


November 13-17 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 12-16 


November 23-24 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 22-23 


December 15 


Fall Quarter Ends 

WINIER 


December 14 


January 3 


Classes Begin 


January 7 


February 19-23 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 25-28 


March 16 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 22 


March 26 


Classes Begin 


April 1 


April 13 


Good Friday Recess 


(During Spring Recess) 


May 14-18 


Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 


May 20-23 


June 8 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 7 


VRRETT-EVANGELI 


CAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 




1989-90 


FALL 


1990-91 


September 21-22 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 20-21 


September 25 


Classes Begin 


September 24 


November 18-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 17-25 


November 27-29 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 26-29 


December 8 


Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 


December 7 


January 3 


Classes Begin 


January 3 


February 26-28 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


Febniary 18-21 


March 9 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 8 


March 19 


Classes Begin 


March 18 


April 12-13 


Good Friday Recess 


March 28-29 


May 25 


Spring Quarter Ends 


May 24 


JTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO: 




1989-90 


FALL 


1990-91 


September 4 


Fall Pre-Term Begins 


September 3 


September 27 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 26 


October 2 


Classes Begin 


October 1 


November 15-16 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 14-15 


November 23-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 22-25 


December 15 


Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 


December 14 


January 3 


Classes Begin 


January 7 


February 21-22 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


Febniary 27-28 


March 16 . 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 22 


March 26 


Classes Begin 


April 1 


April 13 


Good Friday Recess 


(During Spring Recess) 


May 16-17 


Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 


May 22-23 


June 1 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 7 



24 



McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 



1989-90 

September 28-29 
October 2 
November 6-10 
November 15-16 
November 23-26 
December 15 


FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Reading Week 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 


1990-91 

TBA 
(under study) 


January 2 
February 5-9 
February 21-22 
March 16 


WINTER 

Classes Begin 
Reading Week 

Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 




March 26 
April 13 
May 7 -June 1 
June 1 


SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 




iADVlLLE/LOMBARE 
1989-90 

September 27 
October 2 
November 14-16 
November 23-26 
December 16 


) THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL: 

FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 


1990-91 

September 26 

October 1 

November 13-15 

November 22-25 

December 15 


January 3 
February 19-21 
March 17 


WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 


January 7 

Febmary 19-21 

March 23 


March 26 
May 15-17 
June 9 


SPRING 

Classes Begin 

Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 

Spring Quarter Ends 


April 1 

May 21-23 

June 15 


JNDELEESf SEMINARY: 

1989-90 

FALL 

May 1-12 Registration for Fall Quarter 
September 5 Classes Begin 
October 16-27 Registration for Winter Quarter 
November 10 Fall Quarter Ends 


1990-91 

April 29-May 10 

September 4 

October 15-26 

November 9 


November 27 
December 21 -January 3 
January 15-26 
February 16 


WINTER 

Classes Begin 
Christmas Recess 
Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 


November 26 

TBA 

January 14-25 

February 15 


March 5 
April 11-17 
April 30-May 11 
May 18 


SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 


March 4 

March 27-April 2 

April 29-May 10 

May 17 



25 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 
1989-90 





FALL 


September 5-8 


Registration for Year* 


September 1 1 


Classes Begin 


October 9-13 


Reading Week 


November 17 


Fall Quarter Ends 


November 27 


Winter Mini-Term Begins 


December 15 


Winter Mini-Term Ends 




WINTER 


January 3 


Classes Begin 


February 12-16 


Reading Week 


March 9 


Winter Quarter Ends 




SPRING 


March 19 


Classes Begin 


April 13 


Good Friday Recess 


April 16-20 


Reading Week 


May 18 


Spring Quarter Ends 



1990-91 

September 4-7 
September 10 
October 8-12 
November 16 
November 26 
December 14 

January 7 

February 11-15 

March 15 

March 25 

March 29 

April 20-24 

May 24 



* Registration is accepted for adds, drops or changes through the first week of classes in each quarter. 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 
1989-90 



1990-91 





FALL 




September 27 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 26-28 


October 2 


Classes Begin 


October 1 


November 13-17 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 12-16 


November 23-26 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 22-25 


December 15 


Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 


December 14 


January 2 


Classes Begin 


January 7 


February 19-23 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


Febmary 18-22 


March 16 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 15 


March 26 


Classes Begin 


March 25 


April 13 


Good Friday Recess 


March 29 


May 14-18 


Registration for Summer Term 


May 13-17 


June 1 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 7 


ABURY-WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 




1989-90 


FALL 


1990-91 


September 21-22 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 20-21 


September 25 


Classes Begin 


September 24 


November 20-24 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 19-23 


November 28-29 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


November 27-28 


December 8 


Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 


December 7 


January 2 


Classes Begin 


January 2 


February 26-27 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


February 25-26 


March 9 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 8 


March 19 


Classes Begin 


March 18 


April 12-13 


Good Friday Recess 


March 28-29 


May 25 


Spring Quarter Ends 


May 24 



26 



TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL: 

1989-90 1990-91 





FALL 




September21, 22, 25 


Registration for Fall Quarter 


September 24-28 


September 25 


Classes Begin 


October 1 


November 23-27 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 22-26 


December 14 


Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 


December 20 


January 8-9 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


January 7-8 


January 8 


Classes Begin 


January 7 


March 22 


Winter Quarter Ends 
SPRING 


March 21 


April 2-3 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


April 1-2 


April 2 


Classes Begin 


April 1 


April 13-15 


Good Friday Recess 


(During Spring Recess) 


June 14 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 13 



27 



INFORMATION ABOUT COURSE LISTINGS 



In the section of "Course Descriptions" the courses of the ACTS schools are listed for 
each quarter according to an outline of major areas of study as follows: Biblical Studies, 
Historical Studies, Theological Studies, Ethical Studies, Religion and Society Studies, 
World Mission Studies, History of Religions and Ministry Studies. Further subdvisions 
are indicated within each area. In each unit of the outline, courses are listed in alpha- 
betical order of the offering institutions. 

Each course number is preceded by the initials of the institution by which it is offered, 
as follows: 

BTS Bethany Theological Seminary 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

CCPM Chicago Center for Public Ministry 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

G-ETS Garrett'Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

M/L Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

MS Mundelein Seminary 

NETS North Park Theological Seminary 

NBTS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

S'WTS Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 

SCUPE Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

An H suffix on a course number indicates that the course is taught in Spanish or 
bilingually in Spanish and English. If a course is taught in Spanish only, the course 
description is given in Spanish. A K suffix on a course number indicates that the course 
is taught in Korean. 

The standard abbreviations (M, T, W, Th, F) are used for days of the week. TBA is 
used to indicate that a professor or time for a course remains to be arranged (see note 
regarding updating course listings in the section on cross-registration below.) 

EXPLANATIONS OF COURSE NUMBERS: 
BTS: 
Fields of study 



B 
H 
T 
M 

I 

CTU: 
Fields of study: 
B - 



Biblical Studies 

Historical Studies 

Theological Studies 

Ministry Studies 

Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 - Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 -Advanced, Doctoral 



Biblical Studies 

H - Historical Studies 

T - Theological Studies 

E - Ethical Studies 

W - World Mission Studies 

M - Ministry Studies 

I - Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 

CTS: 
Fields of study: 

CH - Christian Heritage 

TEC - Theology, Ethics and Contemporary Culture 

CM - Christian Ministries 



Levels of courses: 
300-399 - Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 -Advanced 
600-699 -Doctoral 



Levels of courses: 
Sames as CTU above 



28 



G-ETS: 
Fields of study: 

11 ' Old Testament 

12 ' New Testament 

13 - Church History 

21 ' Theology 

22 ' Ethics and Society 

3 1 ' Preaching and Worship 

32 ' Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 

33 ' Christian Education 

34 - Church Administration and Evangelism 
40 ' Interdisciplinary 

LSTC: Same as CTU above 

MTS: Same as CTU above 

M/L: 

Fields of study: 

B - Biblical Studies 

H - Historical Studies 

T ' Theological Studies 

E - Ethical Studies 

W - World Mission Studies 

HR- History of Religions 

M - Ministry Studies 

PC ' Pastoral Care 

I ' Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 

MS: 
Fields of study: 
B - Bible 

S ' Systematic Theology 
M - Christian Life 
H ' Church History 
MS - Ministerial Sciences 



Levels of cotirses: 
501-599 -Foundational courses 
601-699 -Advanced courses 



Levels of courses: 
Same as CTU above 



NPTS: 
Fields of study: 



BIBL - 
HIST - 
THEO - 
MNST- 

NBTS: 
Fields of study: 



Biblical Field 
Historical Field 
Theological Field 
Ministry Field 



BL - Biblical Languages 

BS - Biblical Studies 

OT - Old Testament Studies 

NT - New Testament Studies 

CH - Christian Heritage 

TH - Theological Studies 

RS - Religion and Society 

TE - Theology and Ethics 

PS - Christianity and Behavorial Sciences 

CN - Counseling 

PC - Pastoral Care 

ED - Christian Education 

MN - Pastoral/Parish Ministry 

UR - Urban Ministry 

ME - Missions and Evangelism 

CA - Christianity and the Arts/Media 

CR - Comparative/World Religions 

FE - Field Education 

IN - Integrative/Cross Divisional Courses 



Levels of courses: 

200-299 -Introductory 
300-399 -Intermediate 
400-499 - Advanced, requiring research 



Levels of courses: 

100-199 -Core or introductory courses 
200-299 -Elective or intermediate courses 
300-399 -Seminar courses 



Levels of courses: 
Same as CTU above 



29 



S'WTS: 
Fields of study: 

01 ' Old Testament 

02 - New Testament 

03 ' Church History 

04 ' History of Religions 

05 ' Theology 

06 ' Spirituality 

08 - Ethics and Society 

09 ' Liturgies 

11' Preaching and Church Music 

12 ' Christian Education 

13 - Pastoral Psychology and Care 

14 - Church Administration/Small Church 

15 - Theological Bibliography 

TEDS: 
Fields of study: 

OT ' Old Testament and Semitic Studies 

NT - New Testament Studies 

CH - Church History and the History of 

Christian Thought 

ME ' Mission and Evangelism 

ST - Biblical and Systematic Theology 

PR - Philosophy of Religion 

CE ' Christian Education 

PC ' Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 

H ' Homiletics 

PT - Pastoral Theology 



Levels of courses: 
500-599 'Introductory 
600'699 ' Intermediate; prerequisites or 

permission of instructor 

required 
700' 799 ' Advanced; permission of 

instructor required 



Levels of courses: 
500'599 ' Introductory courses 
600'699 ' Intermediate courses 
700-799 ' Mainly Th.M. courses 
800-849 'Doctoral level courses 
850-999 - Doctoral level only 



HOW CROSS-REGISTRATION WORKS 

Students of any of the ACTS schools may take courses from any of the other member 
schools directly and with no added charges. Cross-registration into courses of the 
Chicago Center for Public Ministry, Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education 
or Spertus College of Judaica (see pp. 18-20) may involve differing procedures and pay- 
ment in each school; students are responsible to determine what particulars apply at 
their own schools. 

Exceptions to the process of cross-registration exist a) during the summer quarter 
when tuition is normally paid to the school offering the course; b) for D.Min. courses 
other than Pastoral Care and Counseling; c) in certain courses with limited enrollment. 
Each school in ACTS reserves the right to limit enrollment in certain courses for peda- 
gogical reasons and to set its own policies for the admission of students from other 
schools to such courses. 

A student who cross-registers is subject to the policy for incompletes at the school 
into which he/she cross-registers. 

It should be noted that, although the following listings were accurate when published, 
each school issues a list of changes and corrections just prior to registration for each 
quarter. These lists should be consulted through the Registrar of each school. 



30 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FALL 1989 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

CTU B 546 

Literary Criticism and Biblical Interpretation 

Meir Sternberg's Poetics of Bibliccd Narrcuive pro- 
vides a theoretical base for identifying the ques' 
tions proper to Uterary criticism, as well as formu- 
lating specific interpretive procedures which 
respect the theological content of biblical texts. 
The contributions of Paul Ricoeur, Hans-Georg 
Gadamer and Gerard Genette are also considered. 
Limit: 12. Permission of the instructor required. 
Rosenbbtt W 2-4:30 Fall 

LSTCB-333 

The Bible: Its Message and Content 

The course is intended for students needing a basic 

introduction to the Bible and its content. Reading 

of the Bible will be supplemented with information 

on biblical times, geography, and history. 

Marshall M 7-9:50 P.M. Foil 

MTS B-300 

Litroduction to Biblical Studies 

An overview of content and approaches to scrip- 
ture that are responsible to church and academy. 
Students work each week with texts from both the 
Old Testament and New Testament. Special atten- 
tion given to literary types, historical contexts, 
methodologies and resources for understanding. 
Bolmg/Hilgert MW lO-ll :50 Foil 

Hilgert T 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 

MTS B-300K 

Introduction to Biblical Studies 

(Taught in Korean) 

(For course description, see MTS B-3(X) above.) 
Park M9-iJ:50 Foil 

S-WTS 01/02.503S 
Introduction to Biblical Languages 

The course is designed to provide a very basic 
understanding of biblical Greek and biblical 
Hebrew. They will be located within their language 
families so that the elementary structure of the lan- 
guages can best be illumined. TTie alphabets, some 
vocabulary, and other appropriate exegecical tools 
will also be studied. 
Garvey MTWTK 3-3:50 Fall 



OLD TESTAMENT 

1. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B^323 

Introduction to the Hebrew Bible 

The goal of this course is to provide the student an 
introduction to the history and literature of 
ancient Israel. The student will read an introduc- 
tion to the Hebrew Bible and history of ancient 
Israel. The class periods will focus on issues and 
data not easily available in the reading. 
Roop TTK 8-9:20 Fall 

CTU B 300 

Old Testament Introduction 

A study of the traditions and literature of ancient 
Israel against their historical and cultural back- 
ground. Attention will also be given to some of the 
literary and theological issues involved in biblical 
interpretation. 

Roser\blait MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Bergant (A) UW 1041:15 Winter 

Bowe (B)T 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTSCH301 

People & Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the 
problems of the historical and theological interpre- 
tation of the Old Testament against the back- 
ground of the development of historical methods of 
biblical study. 
LaCocque MW 940:20 Fall 

G-ETS 11-501 

Old Testament Interpretation: 

Pentateuch and Former Prophets 

Introduction of the critical, historical, and theolog- 
ical study of the Hebrew Scriptures, with emphasis 
on the development of interpretive skills in the 
Pentateuch (Genesis-Deuteronomy) and the 
Former Prophets (Joshua -Kings). Limit: 30. 
Roth WF 940:50 Fall 

TBA WF 9-10:50 Winter 

LSTCB-311 

Old Testament Interpretation 

Introduces students to the methods of interpreting 

Old Testament texts, using the Hebrew language, 

and of understanding the Old Testament. Special 

attention will be given to the Psalms and wisdom 

literature. 

Fuerst M 8:30-9:45; W 8:15-9:30 Fall 

Klein MF 9-9:50; W8:45-9:35 Fall 



31 



Old Testament 



NPTSB1BU120 
Old Testament Faith I 

The hterature of the ancient Near East and the 
Jewish-Christian traditions provides the contexts 
in which we "listen" to the Hebrew Bible (Genesis 
through Judges). Five hours. 
Holmgren MWTh9:l540:25 Fall 

NPTS B1BU135 

The Faith of the Psalmist 

An appreciation for the faith of Israel (including 

its relationship to New Testament proclamation) is 

presented by means of an exegetical-theological 

study of selected Psalms. Prereq: BIBL-120 and 

BIBL-121. 

Holmgren M 7- JO P.M. Fall 

NBTS OT 301 

Old Testament Archaeology, History 

and Content 

This course is an introduction to the history of 

ancient Israel. Attention is given to relevant 

archaeological work done in the Near East and to 

the content of the historical books of the Old 

Testament. 

Mariottiru T 7-9:40 PM. Fall 



appropriate to this kind of literature. 

Roop 9/5-15 T'S, M-F 8-i 2 Fall Pre-Tem. 

CTU B 575 

Feminist Interpretation of the Old Testament 

This seminar will consist of: investigation of cur- 
rent feminist approaches to biblical interpretation; 
examination of biblical material in order to see 
how feminine imagery functions therein; develop- 
ment of methods of interpretation that incorporate 
feminist values. 
Bergant T 1-3-30 Fall 

CTS CH 406 
Genesis I '4 in Focus 

An investigation of the early chapters of Genesis, 
vertex of Biblical anthropology. The universe as 
context; vocation as foundation of being: sameness 
and difference; sexes and races; humans and ani- 
mals; image and representation; pregnancy, travail, 
and toil; sin and curse; "fall"? . . . And now? 
LaCocque T 2-5 Fall 

CTS CH 601 

Reading in Mishna Texts 

Text study of a tractate of Mishna. 

Schadman Th 9-12:40 Fall 



IL CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B 405 
Deuteronomistic History 

A study of the story of ancient Israel's life in its 
land as told in the Books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel 
and Kings. Emphasis on the theological perspec- 
tives of the literature, archaeological background 
and the development of interpretive skills. 
Bergant MW 10-11:15 FaR 

TEDS OT550 

English Bible: Deuteronomy 

Demonstration of inductive Bible study method 
and treatment of the special teaching of 
Deuteronomy based on the English text. 
McComiskey TEA Foil 



111. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

BTS B-427 
Ruth and Jonah 

The class will work with Ruth and Jonah exegeti- 
cally and theologically using interpretive tools 



G-ETS 11-603 

Prophetic Books: Jeremiah 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and "The 
Twelve" (Hosea-Malachi). Emphasis on analytical 
and synthetic interpretive skills. Examples of top- 
ics: The Book of Isaiah, The Book of Amos, The 
Suffering Servant, Ezekiel's Vision, 
Nash MTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

G'ETS11-603A 
Prophetic Books: Isaiah 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and "The 
Twelve" (Hosea-Malachi). Emphasis on analytical 
and synthetic interpretive skills. Examples of top- 
ics: The Book of Isaiah, The Book of Amos, The 
Suffering Servant, Ezekiel's Vision. 
Roth TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

LSTC B.620 

Graduate Biblical Seminar I: 

The Pentateuch 

An ongoing seminar on the Pentateuchal materi- 
als. Theme for 1989: Themes of Prayer and 
Intercession. Exploration in traditions and strata of 
the Pentateuch. (For post-M.Div. students. 



32 



Old Testament 



New Testament 



Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Fuent M 1230 A Fofl 

MS B369 

OT Narrative Criticism 

A study of the use of narrative criticism in under- 
standing texts of the Old Testament. The course 
will begin with a careful reading of major works in 
the field, such as Alter's The Art of Biblical 
hJaxrative. The principles of narrative criticism will 
then be applied to specific texts. 
Schoenstene TBA Fofl 

NBTS OT 453 

The Prophetic Movement in Israel 

A study of the nature and history of the prophetic 
movement in Israel from its inception to the post- 
exilic period. The Book of Micah will be studied in 
its historical background through an intensive and 
theological interpretation. 
Mariottini TT/i 9:30-10:50 Foil 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

G-ETS 11*643 
Intermediate Hebrew 

Rapid reading of prose and poetry, review of gram- 
mar and vocabulary, introduction to text criticism. 
Prereq: 11-641/2 or equiv. 
TBA MTh 1:30-3:20 Fofl 

LSTC B-300 
Introduction to Hebrew 

An introduction to the language, preparing stu- 
dents to use Hebrew in their exegetical work. 
Fuerst 9/6-9/26 FaRPre-Term 

M-F8:30-i]:30, ]-2 

LSTC B-300A 
Hebrew Grammar 1 

An introduction to the grammar of Hebrew, 
designed to equip students to use the language in 
exegetical work. Credit is given for this course 
alone, but the grammar cycle is completed in 
Hebrew Grammar II. 
Michel 9-6-9/26 FoUPre-Term 

M-F 8:30-i J :30, J -2 
TBA M-Th 8-8:50 Winter 

MTSB-321-322 

Introducticm to Hebrew Exegesis 1, 11 

A non-divisible two-quarter sequence involving 
the learning of the elements of Hebrew grammar 
followed by translation and exegesis of selected 



portions of the Hebrew Bible, primarily prose. 
Attention will be given to fundamentals of text 
criticism and general principles of biblical interpre- 
tation. Double course. 

MitcheU 9/5-23 Foil Pre-Term 

Mitchell Sec. I : MTWT/i 9-9:50 Fall 

CampbeU Sec. 2: TF 2-3:50 FaU 

NPTS BlBL-100 
Elementary Hebrew 

Knowledge of basic biblical Hebrew is accom- 
plished through a survey of the granunar, transla- 
tion of selected readings and a study of the regular 
verb system. 
Holmgren MTWTh2-3 Fall 

NPTS BlBL-102 
Intermediate Hebrew 

To assist students in developing a greater facility 
with the Hebrew language, varied texts from the 
Hebrew Bible are selected for reading and discus- 
sion. Prereq: BIBL-100 and BIBL-101. 
Koptak TBA Fall 

NBTSBL301H 
Hebreo I (Hebrew 1) 

Este curso es el primer trimestre de una secuencia 

de dos trimestres que intenta ensenar la gramatica 

y vocabulario hebreos, y desarrollar la habilidad de 

traducci6n para que el/la estudiante pueda leer el 

hebreo biblico con la ayuda de herramientas de ref- 

erencia. 

Homing MTh 1-2:20 Fdl 

S-WTS 01-624S 
Intermediate Hebrew 

Rapid reading in a selected portion of the text. 

Both prose and poetry will be read. Attention 

given to comprehension of the passages, building of 

vocabulary, understanding of grammar, syntax and 

style. 

Garvey MW 1-2:50 Fall 



NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B 305 

Introduction to the New Testament 

The writings of the New Testament in their histor- 
ical, cultural, religious, and social context. 
Introduction to the methodological tools employed 
in New Testament research and to the diverse the- 



33 



New Testament 



ologies that comprise the New Testament witness 
to Jesus of Nazareth. 

Rod MW 11:3042:45 Foil 

Reid A; M 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

Bowe B:MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 



studies and Jesus' proclamation of Kingdom. Four 

hours. 

Scholer MWTh 1 1 :4542:55 Fall 

Snodgrass MWTh 8-9: 10 Winter 



G-ETS 12-502 

New Testament Interpretaticm: Acts-Revelation 
Theory and practice of exegesis of selected episto- 
lary texts, with attention to the history of early 
Christianity. Exploration of the theology of Paul, 
Acts, and of late New Testament writings. 
Presentation of various viewpoints through team- 
taught lectures and exegetical sections meeting in 
groups. 

Jewett& Staff T 6-8:15 P.M./kcture; Foil 

8:30-10 PM.1 2 groups 

LSTCB-335 

New Testament Interpretation 

An inductive course designed to introduce students 
to the methods of understanding and interpreting 
the New Testament. A variety of methods will be 
used, with emphasis on the use of texts of the New 
Testament to implement the methods and to 
explore their value. Prereq: Greelc 
Krentz M 9-9:50; W 8:45-9:35 Foil 

F9-9:50arll-ll:50disc.sec. 
Rhoads MF1141:50;W 11:1542:05 Fall 

MTS B-408 
Jesus 

A study of the life and teachings of Jesus as repre- 
sented in the Synoptic Gospels and various apoc- 
ryphal and gnostic works. Attention will be given 
to the problem of the sources, the evangelist's the- 
ology, and the social and political context of Jesus' 
ministry. 
Welhom MW 2-3:50 FaR 

NPTSBIBL-IU 
Introduction to Greek Exegesis 

In addition to a review of forms and grammar, 
attention will be given to translation, the proce- 
dure and tools for exegesis, and an introduction to 
textual criticism. The option for pass-fail is avail- 
able. 
Snodgrass MWTh 8-9: i FaR 

NPTS BIBL150 

Interpreting the New Testament 1: 

The Gospels 

In this introductory treatment of the Gospel's 

attention will be given to hermeneutics, critical 



IL BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B 432 

The Gospel According to Mark 

A study of the Gospel of Mark with attention to its 
structure, major themes and key theological motifs, 
especially the link between the Passion of Jesus and 
Christian discipleship. 
Reid W 7-9:30 PM. Foil 

NPTS BIBL-153 
The Gospel of Mark 

A literary approach to study major diemes and the 
message of the Gospel of Mark with special atten- 
tion to the function of the Gospel in the life of the 
church. 
Lane 12/1145 842 FaRPost-Term 

NPTS BIBL-158 
Acts 

Examination of how the early church went about 
fulfilling its evangelistic mandate. Analysis includ- 
ing the relationship of missionary strategy, the 
nature and practice of the local church, internal 
tensions and their resolution, and whether Acts 
provides a model for the church today. 
Bellevilk TK 2-5 Fall 

NPTS BIBL-162 
Second Corinthians 

Exegetical study focusing on Paul's handling of 
internal and external challenges to his pastoral 
authority. Analysis including the nature of the pas- 
toral ministry, the relation of the local church to its 
society, the intermediate state, stewardship, and 
the model Paul provides for the handling of prob- 
lems in the local church. 
Bellevilk M 2-5 Fall 

NBTS NT 436 
Galatians 

A careful exegetical reading of Galatians as a pas- 
toral letter written in response to a particular com- 
munity situation. The course also seeks to situate 
the theology of Galatians within Pauline theology 
as a whole and to raise constructive theological 
questions about the significance of Paul's gospel 



34 



New Testament 



and pastoral hermeneutic for today. Prereq: NT 

302. 

Cosgrove TK 7-9:30 P.M. Foil 

SCUPEB-TH301 

The Corinthian Church: A Biblical 

Approach to Urban Culture 

Paul's letters to the Corinthian churches become 
the text of this course, which examines Paul's con- 
cept of ministry and models of ministry in a plural- 
istic urban setting. Special attention will be given 
to issues that still cause rifts in modern urban 
churches, such as the role of women, spiritual gifts 
and how to proclaim the gospel to racially, ethni- 
cally or socially diverse groups. 4 hours. Fees may 
apply; see p 19. 
Leslie TKa.m. Foil 

S-WTS 02-603S 
The Fourth Gospel 

The study of the Gospel of John in the context of 

its historical environment. Limit: 30. 

Pervo WF 940:50 Foil 



111. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B^430 

New Testament Theology 

A study of the major strands of faith and theologi- 
cal reflection in the New Testament, the role these 
different strands have played in the story of the 
church, and how the pluriform witness of the New 
Testament functions as a canon of faith and prac- 
tice for the Christian community. Prereq: 
Introduction to New Testament or equiv. 
Gardner WF 8-9:20 Foil 

CTU B 520 

Liturgy of the Synagogue 1 

An overview of the worship forms in the contem- 
porary American synagogue with special reference 
to the common thread and variations in the Jewish 
denominations: Orthodox, Conservative, and 
Reform. 
Perehnuter TThlO-llilS Fall 

CTU B 525 

Texts and Texture of Jesus' Jewish Background 

Designed to deepen the student's understanding of 
the relationship of Christianity to Rabbinic 
Judaism and to develop a capacity to interpret 
Jewish sources, this course will serve as an opportu- 
nity to examine the nature of Rabbinic Judaism 



through an exploration of pertinent Jewish sources. 
Perelmuter MV7 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTS CH 424 

The Theology of John 

An exegetical study of the gospel of John with the 
intent of seeing Christian reality from the point of 
view of the author of the fourth Gospel. Special 
emphasis is placed on its particular style. 
Snyder Th 942:40 Fall 

G-ETS 12-603 

New Testament Theology: Christology 

A study of Christology emerging out of an exegeti- 
cal study of selected New Testament passages. 
Prereq: 12-501 or 12-502. Limit: 15. 
Groh/Stegner M 1:30-4:30 Foil 

LSTC B-550 

New Testament Theology 

An analytical survey of New Testament thought. 
Although the New Testament will be considered in 
its unity, the theology must be studied according to 
its major representatives: Jesus, Paul, Synoptic 
Gospels, John. 
Krentz MW2:30-3:45 Fall 

LSTC B-650 

Graduate Biblical Seminar IV: The Gospels 

An ongoing seminar on the gospel materials. 
Theme for 1989: The Life of Jesus: I^ct or Fiction? 
The life of Jesus research until Schweitzer; form 
criticism; demythologization, the new quest; crite- 
ria for authenticity of sayings; the Jesus seminar; 
current status. (For post-M.Div. students. 
Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Unss T 1:30-5 Foil 

MTS B'438 

How Shall We Hear? The Gospel 

Transcending Culture 

The message of Jesus crossed cultural boundaries in 
the first century. Taking the New Testament as our 
point of departure, we shall explore how the gospel 
finds its voice in a variety of cultural settings, how 
the gospel intersects our own particular cultures. A 
seminar led by students, with faculty participation. 
Prereq: B-300 or equiv. 
Welbom T 6:30-9:30 P.M. Fall 

TEDS NT764 
Pauline Theology 

Seminar in the writings of Paul and recent writers 

on Paul to discover the nature and distinctives of 

Paulinism. 

Harris TBA Fall 



35 



New Testament 
IV, NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

BTS B-316A/NBTS BL 350 
New Testament Greek 1 

In this three-quarter course the student acquires a 
knowledge of the elements of grammar, a working 
vocabulary, and skill in translation of the Greek 
New Testament, using selections from the gospels, 
Acts, Paul, and the general epistles. 
TBA WF 1-2:20 FaR 

BTS B*413 

Greek Exegesis: Narratives and Parables of Luke 

A study of the book of Hebrews according to the 
Greek text. Prereq: New Testament Greek- 
Homing T 3:20-6:10 FaR 

G'ETS 12-641 
Elementary Greek l/Il 

Essential forms and principles of New Testament 
Greek. Two-unit course, credit for 12-641 after sat- 
isfactory completion of 12-642. Limit: 20. 
Stegner TWThF 8-8:50 FaR 

LSTC B-307 

Biblical Greek for Ministry 

A carefully structured intensive course to prepare 
students for the theological curriculum. An in- 
depth exposure to the elements of New Testament 
Greek grammar. Enriched by opportunities for wor- 
ship in Greek Orthodox churches, discussion of 
Greek culture, etc. May be continued with further 
sessions during the fall term. 
Henrich/Rhoads 9/4-9/22 FaRPre-Term 

M-F 8:30-11:30, 1-2 

NPTSB1BL.112 

New Testament Greek Readings 

To increase the facility of students in reading 
Greek, various passages from the New Testament 
will be translated. Open to all students who had 
Beginning Greek and Introduction to Greek 
Exegesis. Pass-Fail. 
Snodgrass TBA Fall 

S-WTS 02-521GS/02-522GS 
Elementary Greek I and II 

A two-quarter course of introduction to the gram- 
mar, vocabulary and translation of the Greek lan- 
guage as it is employed in the New Testament and 
early Christian texts. 
Pervo MTWTh 3-3:50 Fall/Winter 



Historical Studies 

HISTORICAL STUDIES 

1. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H'346 

History of Christianity 1 

An overview of Christian history from the apos- 
tolic period to the Reformation. Topics include the 
presuppositions of Christian history, the early 
church and Roman culture, the Constantinian 
church, the Augustinian synthesis, the conversion 
of Europe, monastic orders, and Eastern 
Orthodoxy. 
Wagner TTK J I -] 2:20 Fall 

CTU H 300 
Early Christianity 

A study of development of doctrine of the Council 
of Chalcedon. Major themes: Christian self-identi- 
fication vis-a-vis Judaism and Hellenistic culture; 
biblical interpretation; heresy and orthodoxy; 
Trinitarian, Christological anthropological dis- 
putes. Emphasis is placed on doctrine rather than 
institutions. Connections with modern concerns 
will be sought out. 
Chkovsky MW 1-2:15 FaR 

G-ETS 13-501 
History of Christianity 1 

A survey of the life, thought, and development of 
Christianity from the post-Apostolic period to the 
Great Schism (a.D. 1054). Limit: 30. 
Groh TTK 9-10:50 Fdl 

Groh TTK 9-10:50 Winter 

LSTC H-332 

Church History: Enlightenment to the Present 

A thematic survey of church history from the eigh- 
teenth century to the present, including the 
church's response to the challenges of the 
Enlightenment and the scientific and industrial 
revolutions. World Christianity and its mission in 
the modem world are the focus of the course. 
Hendel TTK 8:30-9:45 Fall 

NBTS CH 303 
Protestant Evangelicalism 

This course is a survey of movements from the 
Reformation to the present that have been deter- 
minative of the "evangelical" experience with 
Protestantism. Class process oriented to student 
research and participation. Permission of instructor 
required. 
Dayton T 7-9:40 P.M. FaR 



36 



Historical Studies 



S'WTS 03-501S 
General Church History 1: 
The Early Church (100-600) 

A survey of church history from the time of the 
Apostohc Fathers to that of St. Gregory the Great 
with emphasis upor\ the development of ecclesial 
and theological traditions. 
MitcheU TTK 1-2:50 Fall 

TEDS CH634 

History of Christianity I 

Development of Christianity to the close of the fif- 
teenth century including the patristic period; the 
ecumenical councils; the emergence of medieval 
polity; philosophy and theology; the cultural syn- 
thesis of the high middle ages; the waning of the 
medieval period; and the Renaissance in Italy and 
northern Europe. Four hours. 
Woodbridge TBA Fall 



IL HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

CTU H 427 

The Catholic Church in Contemporary China 

This course focuses on the Catholic Church in 
China from 1949 to the present. It studies the situ- 
ation of the Church from the perspective of cur- 
rent developments in the People's Republic of 
China, and the missionary history of the Church in 
mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. It dis- 
cusses the significance of this for the Vatican today 
and for the development of a Chinese contextual 
theology. 
Kaserow UW 1 1 '30-12:45 Foil 

G-ETS 40-671 

United Methodist Studies 1: John Wesley 

A study of the foundational contribution of John 
Wesley to the history, doctrine, and polity of 
emerging Methodism, based on his sermons, letters, 
and treatises. 

Tuttk UTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

Tuide 2/5-3/1 MWTh 1 :30-3 :20 Winter 

LSTCH-360 

Lutheran Confessional Heritage 

Content and scope of the Lutheran confessional 
writings and the manner in which they are norma- 
tive for Lutheran ministry and church life today. 
Recent confessional statements and results of inter- 
confessional dialogues are taken into account. 
Prereq: H-330 or equiv. 

Scherer MW l-2:l5 Fall 

Pero MW 1-2:15 Winter 



MTSH-316K 

The History of the Korean Church from 

1884-1989 (Taught in Korean) 

The Korean Church has a very brief history. Many 
different Christian theologies, traditional Korean 
religions, social and cultural forces have all helped 
to shape the church. This course will explore the 
unique character of die Korean Church because of 
these many influences. 
Lee M 7-9:50 P.M. Foil 

NPTS HlST-255 

Black Religious Experience in America 

The course examines the history of religious life of 
Black Americans, their relation to Protestantism 
and Roman Catholicism, and the development of 
independent Black denominations, sects and cults. 
Newsome 12/11-15 8-12 Fall Post-Term 

NBTSCH401 
Baptist Thought 

This course is an examination and evaluation of 
characteristic Baptist emphases in theology, polity 
and practice in order to enable Baptist leaders to 
function more effectively in the context of ministry 
today. Student study, analysis and evaluation of 
selected issues constitute a vital part of the course. 
Prereq: CH 302 or CH 303. 
Ohlmann TT/i 9:30-10:50 FaU 



III. HISTORY ^ INDIVIDUALS 

CTS CH 580 

Studies in the History of Christian Thought; 

Kierkegaard 

A seminar dealing with the principal writings of a 
major figure in the development of Christian 
thought. The writer chosen for study will be con- 
sidered both in the context of his own time and in 
terms of his relevance for contemporary theological 
work. 
LeFevre T 9-12:40 Fall 

G-ETS 13-608 

Seminar: Life and Work of Martin Luther 

An introduction to Luther's life and theological 
contribution through a study of his sermons, trea- 
tises, and letters. Limit: 15. 
Stein TTh9-10:50 Fall 

G-ETS 13-610 

Spener and Pietism's Efforts 

at Church Renewal 

A survey of Spener's life and work as an introduc- 



37 



Historical Studies 



tion to classic Pietism's contribution to church 

renewal and mission. Limit: 15. 

Stem MT/i J ;30-3. -20 Fall 



alism, Americanism and civil religion, theological 
controversies and the ecumenical movement. 
Graham T/i2-5 Foil 



LSTCH.617 

Luther's Sacramental Theology 

A graduate seminar which examines the context, 
content and significance of Luther's sacramental 
theology. The major sacramental writings by the 
Reformer are read and discussed. A research pro- 
ject focusing on a specific sacramental theme is 
required. (For post-M.Div. students. Admission of 
others by consent of the instructor.) 
Hendel M 1-3:30 FaR 

S-WTS 03^6168 
Richard Hooker 

A study of the preeminent theologian of the six- 
teenth-century Church of England with attention 
both to the situation of the church in Elizabethan 
England and to the contemporary significance of 
Hooker for the ecumenical Christian community, 
WF 940:50 FaR 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

GTS CH 380 

History of Religion in American Society 

An introduction to the historical study of 
American religion, with emphasis on these topics: 
the churches' vision of a "Christian America" from 
the Puritans to the present; civil religion and the 
rituals and myths of public life; the religious bases 
of some reform movements. Attention to dissent- 
ing voices. 
Bass MW 11:20-12:40 FaR 

G-ETS 13-640 

Black Ghurch: Journey of Faith and Freedom 

The unfolding of the Black religious experience, 
from its African roots through its various theologi- 
cal, institutional, and social expressions in the 
United States. Comparisons to Black religion in 
other Western Hemisphere settings will also be 
explored. 
Murphy MW 3:30-5 FaR 

NPTS HlST-250 

Ghurch and American Society 

The course traces the development of the church 
in the American scene. Themes handled: European 
background, The Great Awakening, religious free- 
dom, revivalism and social reform, denomination- 



NPTS THEO-143 
The Evangelical Ghurch 

In a study of the theology and practice of 
American evangelicalism, attention is given to 
contemporary figures and issues. 
RX. Johnston W 2-5 FaR 



W. SELECT TOPICS IN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

GTU H 422 

Nineteenth-Gentury Europe and 
World Mission 

A study is made of the Roman Catholic Church in 
France, England, Germany and Italy as it encoun- 
ters the new world bom of the French Revolution 
with its struggles between liberals and conserva- 
tives as a context for its missionary movement. 
Nemer MV7J0-ii:i5 Fdl 

GTU H 430 

Vatican 11: Solution or Problem? 

The first part of the course will concentrate on the 
background and solutions of the message of 
Vatican II: liturgy, coUegiality, laity, religious life, 
ecumenism and religious liberty, revelation. The 
second part will examine key issues in the modem 
Church to see if Vatican II responds to them. 
Ross MW 2:30-3:45 FaR 

LSTGH-4I9 

Women Leaders of the Early and 

Medieval Ghurch 

A survey of selected women whose lives and writ- 
ings provided leadership to early and medieval 
Christian communities, with a special emphasis on 
texts written by women, each student will present 
and write on one historical figure. 
Rorem W 2:30-5 FaR 

MS H407 

Readings in Feminist Theology 

This course is designed to introduce the student to 
the significant questions being discussed in 
Feminist Theology today through selective read- 
ings in the literature of the movement over the 
past ten years. 
Cunningham TBA Fall 



38 



Historical Studies 



Theological Studies 



NPTSHlST-113 
Church History Survey 

In this introductory survey of the Christian church 
from its inception to the present, selection of 
historical periods and themes will be examined 
with an emphasis on the theological and institu- 
tional development in the context of specific per- 
sons and movements. 
Graham W 7-10 P.M. Foil 



THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

L INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

BTST-451 
Philosophical Theolc^y 

A study of Christian faith and thought in its histor- 
ical development. Following a brief overview of the 
church's interaction with cultural understanding 
through the earlier years, primary attention is 
given to the impact of the Enlightenment and 
some major types of contemporary response. 
Groff TTK 8-9:20 PaR 

CTU T 302 
Experience in Religion 

We look at religion as a social phenomenon, exam- 
ining its functions, assessing its persistence and 
considering its varieties. Our perspective is that of 
the minister as searcher or enquirer, recipient and 
novice, rather than expert and teacher. Students 
participate in and analyze religious practice outside 
their own denomination. 
Gittins MW 2:30-3:45 FaR 

CTU T 325 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources and meth- 
ods of theology worked out from a study of several 
case-histories. Special emphasis on the historical 
revelation in Christianity and the developing 
awareness of the faith -community in relation to 
shifting horizons. 

Lmnan (A) M 7-9 :30 P.M . FaR 

Hayes (B) MW 1 1 :30- J 2:45 FaR 

Bevans TTH 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTS TEC-500 
Interpretation 

A seminar examining diverse modes of theological 
interpretation aiming at developing skills in relat- 



ing theological perspectives to the concrete human 

situation. Non-CTS, permission of instructor 

required. 

UFevre M 2-5 FaR 

G'ETS 21-501 
Systematic Theology 1 

The meaning and methods of systematic theology; 

Christian understanding of God, Trinity, creation, 

persons, and history and eschatology. Prereq: Three 

foundational courses in Bible and history. Limit: 

35. 

WiU WF 9- J 0:50 Fall 

Young 2/5-3/JOTTh 6-8:50 P.M. Winter 

LSTCT-301 

Christian Identity Today 

An introduction to theology as a confessional and 
constructive task. Introduces students to theologi- 
cal methods and to hermeneutical options as they 
interpret classic Christian texts, especially the ecu- 
menical creeds and the Augsburg Confession, 
focusing on the question of how this tradition may 
be appropriated today. 

Bertram TTK 8:30-9:45 FaR 

Braaxen TTfi 8:30-9:45 FaR 

LSTCT-310 

Theology in Multicultural Perspective 

A consideration of the implications for Christian 
faith and practice of contemporary pluralism, and 
especially of the church's encounter with Black 
and Hispanic cultures and with Feminist thought. 
Includes field trips and "plunges" in diverse situa- 
tions. 

Hendel.Hess, TTK Ji-]2:15 FaR 

Pero, Rodriguez 

LSTCT-311 
Christian Theology 1 

The first of a three-course sequence providing a 
survey of the basic doctrines of the Christian faith, 
taking into account biblical origins, historical 
developments, and contemporary significance. 
Emphasis on helping students develop their own 
theological perspectives. Topics in first term 
include the doctrines relating to the First Article of 
the Creed. 

Bertram UW 2:30-3:45 FaR 

Braaten M 1142:15; W 11:1542:30 FaR 

MTST-300A 

Introduction to Christian Theology 

An introduction to the contents, methods, and 
resources of coherent and responsible Christian 
thinking. Attention will be given to understanding 



39 



Theological Studies 



and interpreting basic Christian doctrines (e.g., 
God, Christ, Spirit, Church), The course will use 
resources from contemporary Asian theology as 
well as those representing the Euro- American her- 
itage. This course is primarily for Korean- American 
students. 
Parker TTKJO-J J ;50 Fall 

MTS/LSTCT'311H 

Orientaci^ a la Investigacion Bibliografica 
Teologica (Orientation to Theological 
Bibliographical Research) 

Este curso se propone dar al estudiante un 
conocimiento sistematico de las tecnicas de inves- 
tigaci6n indispensables para el desempeno de la 
educaci6n teologica. Por medio del estudio de 
aspectos teoricos de la investigacion y de la practi- 
ca de diversos ejercicios asignados el estudiante 
podra adquirir un sistema para elaborar trabajos de 
investigacion en otros cursos ofrecidos en el semi- 
nar io. 
Walhce W 1^3:50 Foil 

NPTS THEOOOO 
Systematic Theology 1 

The center of the Christian faith is the person and 

work of Jesus Christ as confessed on the basis of 

Scripture and as reflected upon in the Christian 

tradition. 

Weborg MWTK 8-9: 10 Foil 

NBTS TH 301 
Christian Theology 1 

Designed as the first of a three-quarter sequence 
covering the basic topics in theology, this course 
introduces students to the necessity of theological 
reflection and the importance of developing their 
own theological perspective by considering an 
interpretation of modern western culture together 
with the task of theological prolegomena. 
J. Jones M 7-9:40 PM. Foil 

NBTS TH 301H 

Teologia Cristiana 1: Una Perspectiva Desde el 
Reverse de la Historia (Christian Theology 1: A 
Perspective from the Underside of History) 

Este curso es un arialsis historico-teologico de difer- 
entes maneras de hacer teologia en el mundo 
norteatlantico, con respecto a modelos metodologi- 
cos, presuposiciones filosofico-teologicas y sus 
desarrollos en relacion a condicionamientos 
historicos. Se considerara la emergencia reciente de 
teologias tercermundistas como expresiones de 
"hacer teologia desde el reverso de la historia." 
Mottesi T 6-8:40 P.M. Fall 



S-WTS 05-5018 

Approaches to the Study of Religion 

and Theology 

Especially concerned with the presuppositions and 

methods of theological inquiry, the course deals 

with ways of talking responsibly about God, Jesus 

Christ, and Christian living. TTie philosophical 

and ecumenical contexts for doing theology are 

considered. 

Stevenson TTK 9-10:50 Fall 

S-WTS 05-615S 
Development of Doctrine 

An overview of the development of selected issues 
in Christian thought from the first through the 
nineteenth centuries. Faith and reason; Christ and 
salvation. Limit: 20. 
Barker TTK 1-2:50 Fall 



11. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

BTS T-467 

Seminar: Theology of Bonhoeffer 

The seminar will focus on the life and writings of 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Special attention will be 
given to his doctrine of the church, dieology of dis- 
cipleship, ethics, and themes from his prison let- 
ters. 
Broijun T I2'30'3:l5 Fall 

BTS T'457 

Brethren In Theological Perspective 

Theological presuppositions of Brethren historiog- 
raphy and development will be examined, and pre- 
sent theological trends will be traced. The doc- 
trines and practices of the Brethren will be dis- 
cussed in dialog with contemporary thought. 
Current issues will be delineated. 
Broum WF 10:4042 Fall 

CTUT519 

The Theology of John Henry Newman 

This seminar will consider Newman's An Essay on 
the Development of Christian Doctrine and the theory 
of the development that it presents. Attention will 
also be given to how this theory affected Newman's 
own perception of his life and his work. 
Unrvin T 1-3:30 FaU 

G-ETS 21-644 

The Liturgy of the Synagogue 

An inquiry into the history, structure and content 
of Jewish worship from biblical times to the mod- 



40 



Theological Studies 



ern era. An examination of the various types of 
worship as well as of liturgy of the traditional and 
modem synagogue. (One-half unit) 
Schoolman W 5:30-7:20 P.M. FaU. 

LSTC T-525 
TiUich 

This course will survey and interpret the theologi- 
cal thought and achievement of Paul TiUich. 
GOkey MW 2:30-3:45 Foil 

MTS T^21 

Theology of Karl Barth 

A seminar on the theological contributions of Karl 
Barth, widi a focus on the historical development 
of his thought, issues of theological method raised 
by his work, and an assessment of his strengths and 
weaknesses as an interpreter of the Christian faith. 
Parker ¥9-11:50 Fall 

MSS318/B318 

The Christology of Schillebeeckx 

This course will examine the main texts of the 
Christology of Schillebeeckx: Jesus: An Experiment 
in Christology and Christ: The Experience of Jesus as 
Lord. Christological issues will be explored from 
both a biblical and a systematic perspective. 
LefebmelMclUwne TEA FaR 

MS SA1333 

Readings in Reformation Histoty and Doctrine 

Students will familiarize themselves with some of 
the principal works of Luther, Calvin and Zwingli 
with a view to surfacing and discussing doctrines 
and ministerial approaches that might be accept- 
able in Catholic thought today, and would be of 
some pastoral significance. 
Meyer TEA Fall 

MS S452 

Thomas Aquinas and the Doctrine of God 

The idea of God entertained by some people to 
wh6m the priest must minister is one derived ulti- 
mately from the teachings of St. Thomas Aquinas. 
After reading sections of the Prima Pars of the 
Summa as well as other works of the Angelic 
Doctor, we will discuss his doctrine with a view to 
acculturating it in the world in which we live. 
Meyer TBA FaR 

NPTS HSTX-137; THEO-137 
Theology of Kierkegaard 

This seminar will be a study of selected writings of 
this sigificant nineteenth Danish philosopher/the- 
ologian in their historical contexts. 
Holmer 1 1127-12/8 8-12 FaR Post-Term 



TEDS PR762 

Philosophers of Religious Significance: 

Wittgenstein 

In-depth consideration of the philosophy of 
Wittgenstein, an important non-religious thinker 
whose thought strongly influenced religious and 
theological issues. 
J. Feinherg TEA Fall 



111. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTU T 403 

Theology of World Religions 

This course studies the development of various the- 
ologies of world religions which have emerged in 
the modern era and the significant contributions 
made by various ecumenically oriented theologians 
and thinkers — East and West — towards this end. It 
discusses this from the vantage point of themes and 
questions that have arisen out of the dialogue with 
Eastern cultures and faith-forms (Buddhism, 
Taoism, Confucianism, Hinduism). 
Koserow TTh 8:30-9:45 FaR 

CTU T 430 

The Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

An analysis of why God has become problematic 
for contemporary society is followed by a critical 
review of representative Christian attempts to 
respond to this problem. The course seeks to help 
the student evaluate his or her own experience and 
respond intelligently to the modem person's prob- 
lem of God. 

Phelps W 7-9:30 P.M. FaR 

Eevans (A) W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

Szura (E) TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU T 442 

Christology for Mission and Pastoral Ministry 

A critical study of Jesus the Christ, as revealed 
through Scripture, traditions, and theological 
reflection in an effort to help students come to an 
understanding of the meaning of Jesus Christ for 
their personal life, contemporary society and as 
ground for mission or pastoral practice. 
Phelps MW 10-11:15 FaR 

CTU T 524 

Roman Catholic Theology in an 

Age of Revolution 

A study of the conflicts within Roman Catholic 
thought in the context of the intellectual, cultural, 
and political upheavals of nineteenth-century 



41 



Theological Studies 



Europe. The seminar will focus its attention on the 
creative work, of the early Catholic faculty at 
Tubingen in dialogue with Protestant theology and 
with the philosophy of Hegel and Schelling. 
Hayes MW 2:30-3:45 FaR 

CTS TEC 440 
Theology of Economics 

Contemporary theologians currently draw on non- 
traditional sources for method. An examination of 
economics as one such source. 
Thistlethwcdte T 2-5 FaR 



series of required seminars for doctoral students in 

theology. 

Busse T 7-9:50 P.M. FaR 

MTS T^02 

Baptism and Eucharist 

A study of the Christian doctrines of baptism and 
eucharist, with emphasis on critical analysis of var- 
ious issues now in controversy. Attention will be 
given to the liturgical implications of various theo- 
logical outlooks. 
Burkhart UW10AI:50 FaR 



CTS TEC 570 

Ritual, Sacred Space, and Healing 

An examination of the role of ritual leadership in 

healing. Both religion and psychotherapy will be 

examined. 

Moore W 2-5 FaR 

G-ETS 21-605 
Constructive Theology 

The use of studies in biblical, historical, and con- 
temporary theology in the formulation of one's 
own understanding of the major Christian doc- 
trines. Prereq: One foundational course each in 
Bible, history, and theology. 
Young TTh 9-10:50 FaR 

LSTC T430 

Black Theology and the Black Church 

An analytical survey of the Black experience in the 
United States, theologically correlated with histor- 
ical, psychological and sociological factors. Special 
attention to the construction of a coherent expres- 
sion of the Christian reality so that it redemptively 
engages the world of cultures. 
Pero MW 1-2:15 FaR 

LSTC T575 

Theology in an Age of Science 

This course will focus on the form and content of 
Christian affirmation in its encounter with the 
modern scientific worldviews that are permeating 
our society today. The class will meet two evenings 
a week for four weeks with one or two follow-up 
sessions thereafter. 
Peacocke lO/9-l 1/8 MW 7-9:50 P.M. FaR 

LSTC T602 

Graduate Theological Seminar: The Nineteenth 

Century Background 

A seminar on the history of theology in the nine- 
teenth century for graduate students. First in a 



MTS T433 
Eeminist Theology 

An exploration of the challenges to traditional 
Christian theology posed by feminist thought. 
Students will be exposed to the diversity of 
perspectives in contemporary Christian theology. 
Special attention will be given to feminist critique 
and reconstruction of central Christian doctrines. 
Case-Winters T 1-3:50 FaU 

M/LTS-336 

Theologies in Liberal Churches 

An introduction to liberal theology, organized to 
acquaint the student with the variety of significant 
ways of thinking religiously now current in liberal 
churches and fellowships (primarily those of the 
Unitarian Universalist Association) and to enable 
the student to develop initial statements of his or 
her own religious views. Attention will be given to 
feminist theology, religious humanism, empirical 
theism, liberal Christianity and other related 
views. 
Godbey TBA Fall 

NPTS MNSTIOO 

Introduction to Theological Research 

The student is introduced to basic research 
metholodgy and the basic reference tools of theo- 
logical bibliography. The course is designed to 
encourage experience with a wide vareity of refer- 
ence tools. 
Goertzen 9/22-23 or 1 0/6-7 FaR 

NPTS MNST200 
Theological Bibliography and 
Research Methods 

The goals of this course are to introduce the refer- 
ence tools of theological bibliography and to 
enable the student to develop appropriate research 
strategies for thesis research on a master's level. 
Goertzen MW 2-3:30 FaR 



42 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



NBTS TH 304H 

Teologia de las Comunicaciones 

(Theology of Communication) 

An^lisis del proceso de las comunicaciones, a partir 
de la revelaci6n de Dies y su comunicaci6n maxi- 
ma en la persona de Jesucristo. Se comparten los 
principios t6cnicos de las comunicaciones y las 
directrices claves para una comunicaci6n del 
Evangelio segun el estilo de Dios y el paradigmo de 
Jesucristo. 
Zapata M 6-8:40 P.M. Fofl 

NBTS TH 421 

The Minister as Theologian 

Students will be enabled to identify ways in which 
the minister engages in theologizing in the context 
of ministry, as well as the ways in which ministry 
supports and actually gives expression to theology. 
Students will look at the movement back and forth 
between theology and ministry from a variety of 
perspectives. Prereq: Basic work in theology and 
some field experience. 
Sharp U 2:30-5:10 Fall 

NBTS TH 440H 

Educacion y Teologia: Una Perspectiva 
Tercermundista (Education and Theology: A 
Third World Perspective) 

Estudio de la relacion entre teologia y ministerio 
educativo, enfocado en la contribucion de la 
teologia de la liberacion. Atencion especial a: 
dinamica de la concientizaci6n, vision profetico- 
utopica, epistemologia praxeologica, hermeneuti- 
ca/reflexion critica y comunidad eclesial de base. 
Se alienta la ace ion/reflexion desde el compromiso 
contextual de la fe. Prereq: TH 301 o TH 301 H o 
permiso del professor. 
Schipani F 8-9:20; 10:40-12 FaU 

S-WTS 05'618S 

Special Problems in Theology 

Presentations and discussions by students directed 
towards the integration of theological and pastoral 
understandings. One-half unit. 
Stevenson Th 11-12:30 FaR 

S-WTS 15.502S 
Theological Bibliography 

A systematic examination of bibliographies in bib- 
lical studies, church history, liturgies and pastoral 
ministry. Attention will be given to classification 
and subject headings in theological libraries. One- 
half unit. 
Smith W 9-10:50 FaR 



TEDS ST845 

The Use of the Bible in Theology 

A study of the ways in which theologians, ancient 
and modern, have used the Bible in formulating 
their theological proposals, with a view to answer- 
ing the questions, "What does it mean to be 'bibli- 
cal' in theological argument?" and "What kind of 
authority does Scripture have for theology?" 
Vanhoozer TBA Fall 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

I. MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E 370 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

Christian ethics describes a community's pursuit of 
a life, a sharing in which values important to that 
community are displayed and embodied. Particular 
attention will be paid to the Roman Catholic 
moral tradition, including such topics as the 
virtues, the natural law tradition, and other themes 
important to contemporary Catholic morality. 
Wadell UW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

WadeR M 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU E 375 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

An exploration of the basic texts that illuminate 
how the Christian commimity has understood and 
shaped its response to the social concerns of its 
time. Although emphasis is given to foundational 
texts of the Roman Catholic tradition, authors rep- 
resentative of Protestant traditions will also be 
used. 

Fomasari T 7-9:30 P.M. Fdl 

WadeR MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

Fomasari TTh 1 1 :30-l 2:45 Spring 

CTSTEC321 
Christian Ethics 

Historical and contemporary Christian ethical sys- 
tems with a consideration of their implications and 
current significance. 
Schroeder MW 1 1 :20-l 2:40 Fall 

G-ETS 21/22-503 
Theological Ethics 

A foundational course in Theology and Ethics. The 
formulation and implementation of ethical norms 
derived from faith commitments, based on the 



43 



Ethical Studies 



study of theory and practice (cases); development 
of a self-conscious methodology. Limit: 35. 
Sedgwick/Young TTh3-30'5 FaR 

TBA TBA Spring 

LSTCE-310 
Christian Ethics 

A study of the sources, structure and dynamics of 
Christian ethics, with reference to current prob- 
lems of personal and public life. (Not open to first- 
year students.) 

TBA TF 1-2:15 Fall 

Sherman TF 1-2:15 Winter 

S'WTS 08'501GS 
Theological Ethics 

An investigation of major approaches to ethics, of 
theological themes important for ethical analysis, 
and of the ethical thought of major contemporary 
theologians, all interacting with case studies, in 
order to help students develop their own method of 
using theological commitments to make ethical 
decisions. 
Sedgwick/Young TTfi 3:30-5 FaR 



II. SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

CTU E 456 

The Ethics of Thomas Acquinas 

This course will be a study in the moral theology of 
Aquinas. It will examine his understanding of 
human action, his concept of happiness, and his 
description of charity as friendship with God. 
Particular attention will be given to his treatise on 
the passions, the virtues, and the gifts of the Spirit. 
Wadell MW 11:30-12:45 FaR 

CTU E 551 

SpiritualityA'iturgy and the Quest 

for Justice 

An examination of various models for linking spiri- 
tuality/! igurgy and the church's social justice mis- 
sion. Included are contemporary reinterpretations 
of the Ignatian exercises, Thomas Merton, feminist 
perspectives, liberationist spirituality, and creation- 
centered spirituality. 
PawUhowsld T 1-3:30 FaR 

CTU E 588 

Mystery of Christ and Ethical Life 

The course is designed to study the implications of 
Christology for the life of the Christian community 
as an ethical community in an increasingly secular, 



scientific, culturally and religiously pluralistic 
world. The Christian tradition will be placed in 
dialogue with some significant non-Christian secu- 
lar and religious authors. 
Fomasari MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

CTS TEC 531a 

Paul Tillich: Theology and Social Ethics 

This two-term course is an examination of TiUich's 
philosophical theology and social ethics. The pri- 
mary reading will be Systematic Theology. Although 
it is not encouraged, with the consent of the 
instructor, students may elect only TEC 531a. 
Schroeder T 2-5 FaR 

M/LE399 

The Democratic Eaith 

The primary purpose of the course is definitional: 
to understand the religious, ediical and political 
content of the democratic faith as a distinct struc- 
ture of belief and action in modem history. This 
will be done through a study of the role of demo- 
cratic faith in creating a just and sustainable global 
order, primary expressions of the democratic story, 
the relation of democracy to Christianity and civil 
religion, and selected figures in democratic philoso- 
phy and theology. 
Engel TBA Fall 

NPTSTHEOa24 

Liberation Theology and Ethics 

A survey of Latin American, Asian, African, femi- 
nist and Black liberation theology. The course will 
be given in a seminar format, based on primary 
readings. 
F.B. Nelson W 7-10 P.M. Fall 

NPTS THEO-220 

Christian Ethics and the Church 

Several contemporary moral issues are considered 
from the perspective of biblical theological guide- 
lines. The role of the congregation and other 
church structures is a major focus. 
F.B. Nelson MWTK 9: ]5- J 0:25 Fall 

S-WTS 08-603S 
Problems in Ethics 

This course will consider some specific, practical 
moral problems, such as war and the use of force, 
justice and the social order, suicide, and human 
sexuality. Moral arguments will be evaluated, 
including analysis of theological assumptions and 
the use of technical data. 
Sedgwick MW 1-2:50 Fdl 



44 



Religion and Society Studies 



RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 

BTS 1-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

The seminar runs continually throughout the year. 
It offers opportunity for common reading of peace- 
related materials; presentation and discussion of 
papers; sharing from peace ministries; and dialogue 
with visiting peace theologians, activists, and lead- 
ers. One quarter hour credit per quarter. 
Gardner W 3:20-4:50 FaR 

Meyer 1 122-3/1 6 72:30-4 :30 Winter 

Wagner T 3:10-4:40 Spring 

CCPM/CTSTEC458 

The Black Church as Agent of 

Social Transformation 

An exploration of the theological affirmations of 
the Black. Church and the resulting witness of the 
church. Fees may apply; see p. 18. 
Whiten W 6:30-9:30 PM. Fail 

CCPM/MTS RS-465 
Community Orgaiuzation 

This course is an orientation to the theory and 
practice of community organization, and its rela- 
tionship to the role of churches in the renewal of 
public life. Observation of community organiza- 
tions, and essentials for developing self-sustaining 
community-based institutions will be discussed. 
Theological issues for churches, as well as practical 
problems of organizing are considered. Fees may 
apply; see p. 18. 
Gilh/MartinezIStockweU Th 2-5 FaR 

CTU M 429 

Psychological Aspects of Liberation and Justice 

This course explores psychological aspects of select- 
ed themes in liberation and social justice; e.g., 
alienation, work, revolution, prejudice, liberation. 
Prereq: Introductory social justice and some knowl- 
edge of liberation theology. 
Szma TTK 8:30-9:45 Foil 

CTU E 562 

Religion and American Public Life 

Consideration of the theoretical issues in the 
church-state debate and their ethical implications 
as they have developed in the Catholic community 
since Vatican II; Catholicism's response to first 
amendment issues; specific questions such as sanc- 
tuary and abortion. 
PawUkwoski TTh 10-12:30 FaR 



G-ETS 22-504 
Church and Commimity 

Analysis of local churches' interaction with their 
communities in city, suburb, and small town as a 
basis for ministry in evangelism, counseling, social 
service, and action for social change. Theological 
options, use of social theory and data, case studies 
of effective ministry, and exploration of racism, the 
role of women, and peace action in the local com- 
munity. Limit: 30. 
ThoUnlScott MW 3:30-5 FaR 

G-ETS 22-615 

Spirituality and Social Responsibility 

Spiritual writings and social actions of significant 
representatives in the Christian tradition. Study of 
private and public documents, analysis of personal 
disciplines and basic commitments for social jus- 
tice. Inclusion of writings of men and women from 
the Black and Caucasian traditions and from 
Roman Catholic and Protestant denominations. 
KeUer Th 6-8:50 P.M. FaR 

LSTCW-501 

Churches Under Socialism: The Christian 

Encounter with Marxism 

Focusing on church-state relations in Marxist lands 
and tensions between Christian faith and Marxist- 
Leninist ideology, the course examines the calling 
of the Christian community and the role of believ- 
ers living in Marxist socialist societies, chiefly in 
Eastern Europe and the USSR, but including some 
of the Third World as well. Students reflect on 
their own faith in the encounter with atheism. An 
actual dialogue between East German Marxists and 
Christians is included. 
Scherer TF 2:30-3:45 FaR 

NBTSRS301 
Church and Society 

This course considers theological presuppositions 
about the relation- tension of Christian-world and 
Church-society and analyzes the United States' 
socio-eonomic-political-cultural situation as a real- 
ity in conflict. Students engage in a contemporary 
reading of the Bible from this perspective in order 
to develop paradigms for the Church's life and mis- 
sion. Permission of the instructor required. 
Mottesi W 2:30-5:10 FaR 

SCUPES-H301 
Conceptions of a City 

This four-week orientation course introduces stu- 
dents of SCUPE, their placements and surrounding 
communities, and life in a big industrial city. 
Chicago provides an excellent laboratory setting 



45 



Religion and Society Studies 



World Mission Studies 



for studying urban issues; students learn about the 
city's history, complexity, problems, ethnic groups, 
structures, strengths and weaknesses. Students also 
become acquainted with several models of ministry 
in the city. 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Frenchak/McGibbon 9/5-29 Fall 

TEDS PT 678 

The Church as a Social and Cultural 

Institution 

An examination of the social and cultural dynam- 
ics of the church's life both internally and external- 
ly, with a view toward theological reflection about 
the phenomenon of institutionalization, differing 
patterns of governance, socio-economic factors, 
and the social sources of denominationalism. 
Speer TBA FaR 



WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 



CTU T 403 

Theology of World Religions 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Kaserow TTK8;39-9:45 Foil 

CTU W 427 

African Religions and Western Christianity 

For African missionaries and students, and those 
interested in African and other traditional reli- 
gions: a course designed to develop a crosS'Cultural 
theoh^cal method by explaining Christian theolo- 
gies in terms of African religious symbols and con- 
cepts, by describing how Christian theologies inter- 
act with African traditional theologies, and by 
articulating African Christian theologies. 
Kierwen T 8:30-1 i Foil 

CTU W 430 
Cultural Orientation 

"Foreign" languages have "strange" sounds, and 
tones which can frustrate dedicated learners. Many 
people find it difficult to get started in a new lan- 
guage. We will learn some practical techniques — 
in phonetics and "ear training" — which will really 
help in an essential missionary task: learning a 
local language. 
Gittins TTh 1041:15 Fail 

CTU 1 460 

Training for CrosS'Cultural Ministry 

A quarter- long intensive based on Paulo Freire's 
methodology, providing theological, spiritual and 



experiential dimensions, designed to help partici- 
pants prepare for cross-cultural ministry in the 
Third World or at home. Emphasis is placed on 
ecumenical/interfaith dialogue and the develop- 
ment of attitudes for global mission and spirituality. 
BarbourfDoidge MW 1-2:15 Fall 

CTU W 545 

Social Anthropology for Missionaries 

An attempt is made to "get under the skin" of other 
cultures, by means of lectures and seminars on a 
number of mission-specific themes. We consider 
interculturally: belief, values, socialization, lan- 
guage, reality, perception, thinking and meaning- 
making and other aspects of social relationships. 
Gittins T 1-3:30 FaU 

CTU W 595 

Mission Integration Seminar 

Designed for furloughed/retumed missionaries and 
students wishing to debrief an Overseas Training 
Program or cross-cultural experience. Through 
guided sharing and mutual support, this seminar 
(available for 1, 2, or 3 quarters) helps participants 
process their mission experience and their re-entry 
into the home culture. (Individualized program 
available). 
BarbourfKmerow M 7-9:30 P.M. Foil, Winter, Spring 

NPTS MNST-150 
Introduction to Missions 

Theologies and theories of world mission of the 
church are compared. Evangelical Covenant 
Church mission policies and practices, in addition 
to missionary life in general, are examined. 
Weld M 7- JO P.M. FaU 

NPTS MNST-I54 
Christianity and Culture 

Appreciation of the impact of worldview and cul- 
ture on theology and on Christian forms and prac- 
tices permits more effective communications of the 
gospel. 
Weld 1 1/27-12/15 M'F 842 Foil Post-Term 

NPTS MNST-250 
Mission of the Church 

The biblical basis of mission and various theologies 
and methods for carrying on that mission, particu- 
larly by the Covenant, at home and abroad are 
examined. 
Weld MWTh8-9:lO FaU 

TEDS ME 641 

Missionary Anthropology and Sociology 

Application of anthropological and sociological 
insights to the problems of missiology with special 



46 



World Mission Studies/History of Religions 



Ministry Studies 



attention to the fundamentals of culture and the 
differences in structure and organization of differ- 
ent societies and to the study of change and the 
missionary as an agent of change. 
Rommen TBA FaR 



HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 



LSTC W.426 

World Religions (East Asia) 

A phenomenological study of the interaction of the 
world religions of East Asia (particularly Hinduism 
and Buddhism, but also the religions of China aroad 
Japan) and their relationships with Chrisianity. 
Specific attention will be given to this interaction 
in the Chicago area beginning with the 1893 
World Parliament of Religions and plaris for a simi- 
lar event in Chicago in 1993. 
Lmdberg M 7-9:50 P.M. Fott 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

1. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

BTS M-482 

Designing Innovative and Eaithful Worship 

Setting guidelines for new changes in worship and 
understanding why they are made; discovering the 
difference between a gimmick and what is novel 
and congruent with worship traditions and styles. 
Topics will include the use of hymns in worship 
and how one encounters God in language. 
Wren 9/5-15 T-S, M-F 8-] 2 FaRPre-Term 

CCPM/MTS M-444 

Religious Institutions and Socially 

Responsible Investment 

The course will explore how the church and its 
institutions can act and use resources to foster 
God's will for Shalom. Goals of the course will 
include increased competence for understanding 
economic issues, social analysis, options for action, 
possible consequences and pitfialls, how to broaden 
the discussion, and how to develop policy. Lectures, 
workshops, projects, field visits, and a paper will be 
required. Fees may apply; see p. 18. 
Ramageetal. F 9-11:50 FaR 



CTU M 432 

Hispanics in the U.S.: An Introduction 

A primer on Hispanics in the U.S.: demographics 
and trends, history and description of major 
national groups; political participation; socio- 
eonomic characteristics and social needs; major ini- 
tiatives and pending issues. 
Lucas W 7-9:30 P.M. FaR 

CTS CM 300 

The Practice of Christian Ministry 

A course to assist the student in experiencing and 
initiating a style of pastoral and theological reflec- 
tion; to provide the student with the perspective 
on the nature, history and practice of ministry in 
Christian vocation. Open to students other than 
CTS with permission of the instructor. 
Edgerton MW 2-3:20 Fall 

CTS CM 309a 

Reading the Signs of the Congregation 

This two-quarter seminar will explore the theories 
and methods for interpreting congregational identi- 
ty, context, program and process. Several intensives 
and a project will be involved. The second half 
offered in the Spring Quarter. (Students may elect 
either quarter independently with ADVANCED 
permission of the instructor). 
Owens TBA FaR 

G-ETS 34-504 

The Administration of the Local Church 

Understanding the local church as a covenant 
community (biblically, theologically, functionally, 
and institutionally). Facing issues of authority and 
power. Consideration of covenantal administra- 
tion, connectionally and liturgically, as a process 
and in special events (baptisms, confirmations, 
holy communion, weddings, memorial services). 
Practice and preparation of a mission statement 
and building support for the local church's mission. 
Troxell M 1:30-4:30 FaR 

G-ETS 33/34-507 

Leadership in the Local Church 

Introduction to administrative and educational 
ministries. Leadership styles and methods, both lay 
and ordained. Theory and practice of leadership for 
Christian education and the total church, 
expressed in areas such as organization and systems, 
staff relationships, group process, teaching and 
learning, and selection, recruitment, training, and 
support of lay volunteers. Pass/fail only. Limit: 25. 
Wmgeier T 6-8:50 P.M. Fall 



47 



Ministry Studies 



G-ETS 34-610 
Introductirai to Evangelism 

Attention to the Gospel and its transmission in the 
New Testament and early Church history. 
Exploration of informal contemporary patterns of 
personal and corporate evangelism, including spe- 
cific stragegies for communicating the Christian 
faith in today's world. 
Tuttk MW 3:30-5 FaR 

MTSM-312 

Mission Imperatives: 

Evangelism, Stewardship, Social Services, 

Systemic Change and World Community 

An introduction to the church in the world: shar- 
ing the Good News — evangelism; developing 
resources — stewardship; responding to human 
need — social service; organizing for justice — sys- 
temic change; and seeking peace (shalom) — 
world community; suggesting biblical-theological 
foundations, participant motivations, leadership 
personalities, available resources, case studies and 
model situations. 
Dudky MW 4-5:50 FaR 

MS MS367 

Managing Conflict in a Parish Community 

In any parish a priest has to deal with conflict situ- 
ations. This course will develop strategies in con- 
flict management, as well as help an individual 
learn his present conflict management style. It will 
also provide training in negotiation skills needed 
by a priest in parish situations. 
Kicanas TBA Foil 

NPTSMNST-171 

Stewardship and Financial Management 

Biblical, historical, theological, cultural, and prac- 
tical information to lead a congregation in its stew- 
ardship and financial management. Focus begins 
with the consideration of stewardship of life and 
then narrows to stewardship of money, things, self, 
and time. 
Carlson TK 7-10 P.M. FaR 

NPTS MNST-260 
Metropolitan Evangelism 

The complexity and diversity of urban centers is 
studied with emphasis on biblical and culturally 
appropriate models for evangelism and church 
planting in cities. 
Reed Th7'lO P.M. FaR 



NPTS MNST-261 
Contemporary Evangelism: 
Methods and Resources 

A course designed for die student who is already 
pastoring or is soon to be the pastor of a local 
church. The tools for evangelism will be presented 
by guest practitioners who have effectively used 
them. The class will then probe behind tlie tools 
for the theory and theology. 
Persson 11/27-12/8 8-12 FaRPost-Tenn 

NPTS MNST-278 
Managranent Skills 

The course will review basic principles and prac- 
tices of management with a focus on developing 
practical management skills to assist the Christian 
leader in die effective conduct of his/her ministry. 
Attention will be given to planning, organizing, 
staffing, leading, deciding and communicating. 
Wright 1 ] /27-1 2/1 FaR Post-Term 

NBTSIN310 

The Art of Interpretation in 

Ministry Formation 

This course introduces students to certain issues of 
Christian faith and life that the seminary regards as 
important for theological development. The "art of 
interpretation" has been chosen as the central 
theme. Questions of "self," "tradition," "identity" 
and "mission" will be treated as issues of interpreta- 
tion with which students must wrestle in the course 
of their seminary education and personal formation 
for ministry. 
Cosgrove/Nelson M 7-9:40 P.M. FaR 

NETS ME 314 

Evangelism and the Local Church 

This course will focus on the training of church 
leaders for evangelistic outreach in the context of 
the local church. Pluriform models from a variety 
of cultural contexts will be examined. 
Price W 2:30-5:10 FaR 

SCUPEM301 

The Black Church in the Urban Setting 

The organization and dynamics of Black life as 
experienced in the city's minority-dominant com- 
munities is the focus of this one-week intensive 
course. Organized around the shared social institu- 
tions unique to the Black experience, the course 
looks at the Black church and the extended family 
structure, among other features. 4 hours. Fees may 
apply; see p. 19. 
Wright 10/2-6 FaR 



48 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 



SCUPE M 304 

Introduction to Urban Ministry 

This course takes a closer look at the particular 
problems of the inner city poor in relation to the 
city as a whole and examines models of effective 
ministry. 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Cberbaut Ta.M. Fall 

S-WTS 14'611S 
Theology of Ministry 

An exploration of the theological basis for ministry. 
This course will examine the relations between 
one's christological and ecclesiological presuppo- 
tions and one's views of ministry. Specifically, we 
will compare the effects of pre-Constantian, 
medieval, and contemporary assumptions about the 
relationship between "church" and "world" in order 
to discern the causes for the kind of ministry prac- 
ticed in each setting and the implicit mandate for 
today. 
Winters MW 3-4:50 FaR 



11. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

BTS M-389 

Minister as Spiritual Guide 

The course examines the nature of ministry as spir- 
itual direction and shapes a model of spiritual 
direction that may be appropriate for the 
Protestant tradition, both for giving spiritual guid- 
ance to congregational members and friends and 
for finding spiritual support for the minister's own 
personal struggles. 
Faus TTh 11-12:20 FaR 

BTS M-450 

Lived Spirituality: Holocaust in the 

Twentieth Century 

The course will explore ancient and new spirituali- 
ties through the medium of the novel. Students 
will encounter other spiritual journeys to gain a 
better understanding of such and to illumine and 
better express their own. One hour credit. 
MeyerfMay 10/13-15 Weekend intesive Fall 

CTUM 412 

Theology and Forms of Prayer 

Aim: To help students understand their own prayer 
life, to improve in it and to help others. After an 
initial study on prayer in New Testament, the 
course will offer an exposition of the different 



forms of Christian prayer (liturgical, private, ways 
of mental prayer, devotions in jxjpular piety) con- 
sidering their development in history and in differ- 
ent cultural situations. 
Lozano TTK 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTUM 413 
Jesus of Nazareth: 
Reinterpreting his Spirituality 

Based on the twentieth-century research into the 
personality and history of Jesus, this course will 
attempt to give fresh understanding of the spiritual 
exjjerience of Jesus as a source of inspiration for the 
spirituality of his disciples. A personal journal of 
readings and reflections will be required. 
Lozano TTh J 1 ;30-l 2:45 Fall 

CTU T 443 

Guadalupe: Expression of Hispanic Spirituality 

Guadalupe is a profound expression of Hispanic 
spirituality. This course will offer an opportunity to 
study the history, significance and tradition of this 
devotion as well as its pastoral application and cel- 
ebration. 
Pineda UW 1-2:45 Fad 

CTUM 5 13 

Ignatian Spirituality and the Discernment 

of Spirits 

A survey of the spiritual revolution initiated by 
Saint Ignatius of Loyola in the sixteenth century. A 
critical examination of the Spiriauil Exercises and its 
influence on later and contemporary spirituality 
and piety. A study of the development of the 
notion of the discernment of spirits from the early 
Christian church down to the present. 
Moosbmgger UW 1 1 :30-l 2:45 Fall 

CTS CM 438 

Liberating Prayer 

An examination of the life of prayer and the role of 

prayer in liberation spirituality. 

Moore Th9-12:40 FaU 

G-ETS 22-615 

Spirituality and Social Responsibility 

(For course description, see Religion and Society 

Studies.) 

Keller TK 6-8:50 P.M. FaU 

LSTC M-486 

Lutheran Traditions of Spirituality 

This course explores, through reading and discus- 
sion, the major writings which have influenced 
Continental and American Lutheran piety from 
Luther to Bonhoeffer and Hammarskjold. The 



49 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 



Pastoral Care 



practical side of the course deals with students' 
spiritual disciplines and explores methods of prayer, 
joumaling, etc. 
RocheUe MW 8-8:50; W 7:45-8:35 Fall 

NPTSMNST-101 

Spiritual Formation I: Spiritual Journey 

The spiritual life grows by direction and discipline. 
The journal, prayer life, devotiorial reading, time 
management and simplicity are modes of discipline 
and direction which are examined in this course. 
One hour. 
Weborg T 8-9:50 Foil 



111. PASTORAL CARE 

BTS M-335 

Pastoral Care of Women 

Designed as much for men working with women, as 
for women learning about their own psychology, 
this course looks at what it means to counsel 
women in the church. Issues of abuse, sexual vio- 
lencxe, women's psychology and issues of authority 
will be covered. 
Garrison Th 12:30-3:15 FaR 

CTU M 405 

Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 

This course aids students to develop and assess: 1) 
knowledge of pastoral counseling principles and 
dynamics; 2) skills in the face-to-face encounter; 3) 
ability to critique and learn from their counseling 
ministry. Considerable time is spent outside the 
class in practice and review sessions with peers and 
instructors. Limited enrollment. 
Anderson MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

McCarthy TTK 1 1 :30-12:45 Winter 

Anderson TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU M 428 

Pastoral Counseling in the Parish 

An advanced course designed to develop an 
approach to pastoral counseling in a parish context 
through role playing and critical examination of 
therapeutic methodologies inthe light of theology. 
Anderson T 1-3:30 FaR 

CTU W 460 

Cross-Cultural Ministry in North America 

For those interested in cross-cultural ministry 
whether at home or abroad: this course is designed 
to develop, through pastoral research, an under- 
standing and appreciation of how other cultures 



and subcultures express and celebrate beliefs in 

God, humanity and the world. 

Kirwen M 8:30-11 Fall 

CTS CM 560 

Readings in Feminist Psychology 

Seminar focusing on selected contemporary writ- 
ings in area of women, psychology, religion and cul- 
ture. Investigates 1) new developmental models 
and self-concepts; 2) altered views of therapy/ther- 
apeutic goals; 3) understanding of a reality that 
appears to be unique to women. Reflection on 
impact of feminist psychology upon pastoral care, 
counseling, ministry and church. Enrollment limit- 
ed to 15. 
MiUer-McLemore W 1-5 FaU 

G'KTS 32-501 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

An introductory course including a study of human 
development, growth, crisis, and pathology; the 
development of skills in integrating theology and 
the practice of ministry with an understanding of 
human growth and interpersonal relationships. 
Limit: 30. 

Hinkk (A) MW 3:30-5 FaR 

Wimberly (B) Th 6-8:50 P.M. FaR 

Ashbrook TTh 9-1 0:50 Winter 

G-ETS 32-611 
Pastoral Theology 

Exploration of the integration of theology with the 
practice of pastoral care and counseling through 
the use of case studies presented by the partici- 
pants. Limit: 12. Prereq: One foundational course 
each in Old Testament, New Testament, and 
Theology, and permission of the instructor. 
Wimberly MTh 1:30-3:20 FaR 

G-ETS 32-631 

Pastoral Counseling: The Pastor as Counselor 

Exposure to the theory and practice of pastoral 
counseling for the prospective parish pastor. 
Emphasis given to counseling skills development as 
well as to theological and psychological models of 
interpretation. Limit: 15. Prereq: 32-501. 
Hmkle M 7-9:50 p.m. Fall 

LSTC M-320 
Pastoral Care 

A foundational course in pastoral ministry consist- 
ing of historical and theological perspectives for 
pastoral care as well as contemporary situation-ori- 
ented workshops. Regular consultation between 
classroom and Teaching Parish staff as well as peri- 



50 



Pastoral Care 



odic inclusion of the latter in classroom workshops 
provide for an integrated approach. 
Swanson TTh 11-12:15 FaR 

TBA TThllAI'AS FaR 

Swanson M 8'30'9:45; W 8:]5-9:30 Spring 
TBA M 1142:15; W 11:1542:30 Spring 

LSTCM-520 

Group Dynamics and Group Therapy 

Emphasis upon the learning and therapeutic expe- 
rience amidst the dynamic interactions and inter- 
personal relations of an ongoing group situation. 
Psychological and theological reflection as well as 
consideration of small group and communication 
theory. Limited to M.Div. Seniors and D.Min. stu- 
dents. 
Swanson TTh 8-9:45 Fall 

LSTC M'622A and D 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

Supervised clinical work in marriage and family 
therapy in the Marriage and Family Therapy 
Center, Palos Park, IL. TTierapy with individuals, 
couples, and families, together with theoretical 
input, staff evalution sessions, and case review. 
(Limited to D.Min. in P.C.C. students.) 
Swanson TBA FaR 

Swanson TBA Winter 

Swanson TBA Spring 



method applies these concepts to pastoral situa- 
tions. Guest presenters speak to specific areas, such 
as pharmacology. Prereq: MNST-120 or equiv. 
HaRsten M 2-5 Fall 

NPTSMNST-129 
Ministry to Abused Persons 

A study of the issues and theology in victimization 
and pastoral skills to approach, assess and intervene 
in domestic violence and abuse situations. 
Alsdurf 12/4-8 8-12 FaR Post-Term 



NPTS MNST'221 
Grief, Death and Dying 

Guest presentations, lecture, readings and case 
method provide an analysis of terminal illness and 
its implications for the patient and the family, and 
for pastoral care for the dying and bereaved. 
Jackson W 7-10 P.M. Fall 

NETS PC 301 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

This is an introductory course including the devel- 
opment of skills in integrating theology and the 
practice of ministry with an understanding of issues 
in interpersonal relationships and their cultural 
contexts. 
Justes UTh 1-2:20 FaR 



MTS M'429 

Cultural Dimensions of Pastoral Care 

Pastoral care involves being present to others 
including their cultural, racial, sexual and religious 
assumptions. This also requires understanding and 
transcending our own values (biases). This course 
will examine how culture and religion shape 
human values. Lectures, class participation and 
case material will expand awareness of values issues 
for more effective pastoral care. 
Woemer W 6:30-9:30 P.M. FaR 

NPTS MNST-120 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

For first-year students. Case methods, role play, 
demonstrations, readings and lecture impart strate- 
gies and skills to equip the pastor for working with 
the congregation to provide an effective ministry to 
personal and family needs. 
HaRsten UWTh 1 1 :45-12:55 FaR 

NPTSMNST-127 
Pastoral Counseling 

Readings and discussion explore the principal 
approaches and history of pastoral counseling. Case 



SCUPEPC301 

Practicum: Support Systems in Urban Ministry 

Human communities and human systems are gov- 
erned by predictable rules and patterns of interac- 
tion. The way that people participate in those com- 
munities is influenced by the first lessons in com- 
munity life they receive from their families of ori- 
gin. Practicum sessions focus on how systems func- 
tion and how students function within the systems. 
2 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Chesney Th P.M. FaR 

S-WTS 13-502S 
Pastoral Care 

Covering the scope and basic principles of pastoral 
care, this course gives a historical and theological 
perspective from which to view and assess the vari- 
ous roles in which pastoral care has been cast and 
seeks to enable students to discern appropriate 
models of pastoral care for their ministries today. 
Wmters/Ross TTh9-10:50 Fall 



51 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



IV. LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

CTU T 355 

Sacraments: Theology and Celebration 

A basic course in sacraments which will explore 
the human religious experience of the faith com- 
munity and its expression in sacramental celebra- 
tion. The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults will 
serve as a basis for the examination of new sacra- 
mental models. 

Ostdiek M 7-9:30 PM. FaR 

Hughes MW 1041:15 Winter 

CTU T 450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the origins and development of 
eucharistic liturgy and theology, with a particular 
emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. Theological 
reflection on the development of eucharist will pre- 
pare for the discussion of contemporary issues in 
eucharistic theology and practice. 
Foley TTK ]0-Ji;l5 Foil 

TBA TT/i iO-lJ;]5 Winter 

CTU T 455 

Becoming a Catholic Christian 

Historical, theological, and pastoral reflection on 
the experience and sacraments of Christian 
Initiation, with particular focus on the Rite of 
Christian Initiation of Adults as the norm for ini- 
tiatory practice. 

Hughes TTK JO-li; 15 Fall 

TBA T 7-9:30 PM. Winter 

CTU T 550 

The Liturgical Year 

This seminar course will trace the development of 
liturgical feasts and seasons, and their theological 
implications. Historical studies will prepare for 
reflection on the current shape of the liturgical 
year, and discussion of its celebration. 
Foley MW 10-11:15 FaR 

LSTCM^483 
Alternative Liturgy 

A review of the ligurgical materials in the 
Lutheran Book of Warship. Alternatives are explored 
at three levels: (1) Wider use of options suggested 
by the liturgies themselves; (2) Substitutions in the 
spirit and intent of the liturgies; (3) Development 
of other forms and texts as ways to accomplish wor- 
ship in the 90s. 
Bangert MW 1-2:15 FaR 



MTSM-314 

Understanding the Dynamics of 

Corporate Worship 

We begin by studying the nature of authentic, 
corporate Christian worship, from theological, his- 
torical and pastoral perspectives. In light of that 
understanding, we then explore what gives integri- 
ty to the Sacraments, order of worship, public 
prayers, weddings, funerals, music in worship, chil- 
dren in worship, and observance of the Christian 



year. 
Wardkuv 



TTh 10-11:50 



Fall 



S'WTS 09-645S 
Liturgical Theology 

A study of the liturgy as theology; the readings 
include the works of a number of contemporary 
liturgical theologians, including Alexander 
Schmemann, Aidan Kavanagh, Geoffrey 
Wainwright, and David Power. Limit: 15. 
MitcheR MW 1-2:50 FaR 

S-WTS 1I-503S 

The Hymnal 1982 

An exploration of the resources of the HymnaL 

This course seeks to help students become familiar 

with the various textual and musical styles repre- 

sentated in the book, and to cultivate students' 

critical skills for practical use in a parish setting. 

One-half unit. 

Howe W 9-10:50 FaR 

S-WTS 1I-515S 

Introduction to Church Music I 

The first hour of this course is spent in the 
rehearsal of music for chapel liturgies, with atten- 
tion to building repertoire and singing it with style 
and care. The second hour is lecture on and discus- 
sion of readings in the history, theology, and prac- 
tice of church music. One-half unit. 
Hou;e M 10-11; Th 11-11:50 FaR 

TEDS PT 845 

Hymnology, Church Music and Songleading 

The study of the development of Christian 
hymnody from its beginning to the present with 
emphasis on English and early Greek, Latin and 
French influences. Instruction in the use of the 
voice in public worship, elements of songleading 
and the creative use of the hymnal. 
Satre TBA FaR 



52 



Preaching and Communication 



V. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

BTS M-370 
Introduction to Preaching 

As an introductory course, the goals are to enable 
the students to acquire the basic knowledge and 
skills necessary for understanding and effectively 
performing the preaching art. The structure of the 
course will include a survey of Biblical and theolog- 
ical foundations for preaching. 
Taylor T 2:30-5:15 FaR 

CTU M 449 

Communciation Skills for Public Ministry 

Students will examine the nature and dynamics of 
the human communication process as applied to 1) 
oral interpretation of literature, 2) rhetorical design 
and public discourse, and 3) mass media. Seminars, 
discussions and skill development through special- 
ized concentration in one of the above areas. 
Emphasis on refinement of communication skills 
required for public ministry. 
TBA MW 1041:15 FaU 

TBA MWl 1 :30'l 2:45 Winter 

TBA MW 11:3042:45 Spring 

CTU M 450 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembly 

A foundational lecture and practicum course for 
exploring the principles and practice of liturgical 
preaching. Topics include: authority of the Word of 
God, nature of the biblical homily and its place in 
liturgy, the lectionary, development of method and 
style. Limited enrollment. Prereq: M 449. 
Cannon (A) T 8:304 1 FaR 

Cannon (B)W 1-3:30 FaR 

Cannon (A) W 8:30-1 1 Winter 

TBA (B)T 8:30-1 1 Winter 

TBA W8:30-iJ Spring 

G-ETS 31-501 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

The growth of the sermon from text and idea 
through presentation and evaluation. Delivery of 
sermons by each student in class. The course may 
not be taken during a student's first year or its part- 
time equivalent . Limit: 12. 

Cha^ieU MW 3:30-5:20 FaR 

TBA TTh9-J0:50 FaR 

ChatfieU MW 3:30-5:20 Winter 

TBA TTK9-J0:50 Winter 

ChatfieU MW 3:30-5:20 Spring 

TBA MTh 1:30-3:30 Spring 



G-ETS 31-605 

The Uses of Story in Preaching 

Exploration, through reading, experimentation and 
preaching to the class, of some of the ways story has 
been and can be used to enhance preaching, such 
as plotted structure, participatory preparation, 
imaged argument, and eventful language. Limit 1 2. 
Prereq: 31-501. 
ChatfieU MTh 1 :30-3:20 Fall 

G-ETS 31-633 

Preaching from the Black Experience 

The course will address the problem of pluralism in 
the worship life of the Black church. Analysis of 
social, political, economic and cultural variables 
constitutive of the diversity of the Black church; 
attention to the modes of hearing and preaching 
appropriate to each. Prereq: foundational course in 
preaching. 
Felton TK 7-9:50 P.M. FaR 

MTS M-324 
Introducti(xi to Preaching 

This course will introduce: 1) The nature of 
preaching, based on theological reflection and on 
practice, and the setting of preaching; 2) What to 
say: an examination of exegesis and biblical inter- 
pretation, and the relation of preaching to the 
world. 3) How to say it: sermon construction, as 
both written and oral word. 4) How to say it out 
loud: speech training and practice in delivery. 
Griffis MW 2-3:50 FaR 

MTSM-327 

Public Communication Skills for Ministry 

A study of the dynamics of the communication 
process and the communication skills utilized with- 
in the church. Concentration on developing oral, 
physical and verbal skills with reference to one's 
individual communicative style, especially in pub- 
lic speaking, oral interpretation of Scripture, and 
storytelling. Limit: 10. 
].Scholer F 9-11:50 FaR 

MTSA.STCM-419H 

Del Texto Al Serm<xi (From Text to Sermon) 

Este curso es una introduccion a la predicacion 
para estudiantes que serviran o sirven congregacion 
del sermon forman el curso. Especificamente, el 
contenido tiene su influencia desde la prespective 
de liberacion. Ademas, la experiencia de predica- 
cion tormara lugar en una iglesia hispana local. 
Armenddriz W 7-9:50 P.M. FaR 



53 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



MSMS315 

Oral Interpretation of Religious Literature 

A study of the various forms of religious literature 
in the history of the Church, leading to oral pre- 
sentations of representative examples. 
Experimental modes and media for the communi- 
cation of Christian poetry and prose. Special atten- 
tion to biography and letters. 
Jcdjusch TBA FaR 

NPTS MNST-097 
Reading Improvement 

A non-credit, remedial reading course designed to 

help students whose test scores are low on the 

Nelson- Denny Test which is administered upon 

entrance. 

TBA TBA FaR 



the educational dimensions of die ministry of the 
church. Students will engage in critical and con- 
structive reflection on Christian education, design- 
ing a personal vision for their own educational 
ministry and developing some of the skills needed 
to practice it effectively. 
Richter TTh 9:30-10:50 Fail 

BTS M.322 
Ministry with Youth 

This course will explore the adolescent years, the 
youth culture in this country, and the church's 
ministry with youth. Particular attention will be 
given to the way in which theological, behavioral, 
and sociocultural insights are integrated to guide 
educational judgments and practice. 
Richter T 6:15-9:15 P.M. Foil 



NPTSMNST-212 
Preachers of the Past 

Students from homiletic background survey 
preaching in church history with focus on models, 
methods and materiak. 
Hjelm W2'5 Fall 

NETS MN 381 

Communcating in Pastoral Contexts 

This course introduces the student to communica- 
tion within the church, considering the dynamics 
of the communication process and emphasizing the 
development of skills in public speaking, story- 
telling and oral interpretation of litereature, espe- 
cially the Bible. Video-taping fee. 
TBA M 7-8 P.M. aR sectiom FaR 

Sec. I: M 8-9:40 P.M. 

Sec. 2: T J -2:20 

NETS MN 480 

Preaching in the Black Perspective 

This course is a seminar-practicum designed to 
explore the various socio-cultural influences, the 
technical tools, the dynamics for using the Bible in 
the context of Black preaching, and the essential 
relationships between homiletic and hermeneutic 
limited to the discussion of the significance as it 
relates to the Black religious experience/Black 
church. 
McCreary TK 6-8:40 P.M. FaR 



CTU M 463 

Wholistic Parish Education 

This course helps the minsiter design, plan and 
work with staff and volunteers in a total parish reli- 
gious education program. Class sessions include 
adult catechesis, evangelization, sacramental prepa- 
ration, principles of cutlural adaptation and educa- 
tion of the parish in prayer and social justice. 
Lucinio T 1-3:30 FaR 

Lucimo T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTSCM321 

Churches' Teaching Ministry 

with Young Children 

Focus of this team-taught course is churches' teach- 
ing ministry from birth to age twelve. Theory and 
teaching techniques will be grounded in early 
stages of human development. Church day care 
centers; the family unit in worship and at home; 
and the place of child in resurgent Sunday Church 
School emphasized. 
B. Myers/W. Myers M 2-5 FaR 

G-ETS 33-506 

The Parish as a Community of Learning 

An examination of the task of the pastor and edu- 
cator as theological educators in the parish. 
Attention is given to the interplay of theology and 
teaching methods within the life and mission of 
the community of faith. Limit: 24. 
Seymour WF 9-10:50 FaR 



VL EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

BTS M-396 
Educational Ministry 

This course is designed as a basic introduction to 



G-ETS 33/31-620 

Worship and Christian Education 

Examination of the interaction of worship (sacra- 
ments, liturgy, ritual, and the word) and the teach- 
ing/learning life of the community of faith. 
Resources examined and skills developed for plan- 
ning and leading worship in light of the develop- 



54 



Educational Ministry 



mental needs of persons in a variety of settings, 
including issues relating to children in worship. 
Limit: 20. 
Vogel TTK 3;30-5 Fall 

LSTCM-460 

Educational Ministry with Youth 

Dealing with the theological and developmental 
principles guiding a ministry with youth, examin- 
ing the human and media resources available from 
a variety of groups, and exploring the settings and 
strategies that can be employed in ministry with 
youth. 
Conrad W 7-9:50 PM. Fall 



NPTS MNST.237 
Communicating with Adolescents 

Skills of communicating to teach and proclaim the 
Christian message in an effective way are devel- 
oped. Will also involve a weekend. 
Bromstrup 11/2742/1 8-J2 Fall Post-Tern 

NPTS MNST.240 

Christian Education Module: Early Childhood 

Ministry 

This experience is for the experiential develop- 
ment of basic teaching skills for early childhood in 
the church. 
Boiver 10/27-28 Fail 



LSTC M-462 

Theological Themes in Children's Literature 

A sampling of current children's literature focusing 
on theological issues and how these issues are han- 
dled will provide the backdrop for this course. 
Concerns such as family, nurture and brokermess, 
pain and evil, humor and joy, loneliness and death 
will be explored. Application of these themes and 
issues will be applied to teaching, preaching, and 
worship for children and adults. 
Bozeman MW 1-2:15 Foil 

MA- M 305 

Religious Education for Parish Ministers: 

Theory and Practice 

An introductory course emphasizing the knowledge 
and skills needed by parish ministers, the place of 
religious education within the church, identifying 
human and curricular resources, methodology, the 
minister's role as teacher and as facilitator for the 
administration of a program of life span religious 
education within the congregation. 
Gooding TBA Foil 

NPTSMNST-131 

Introduction to Christian Education 

and Discipleship 

The conceptual framework for the building of an 
effective teaching ministry in the local church is 
examined: historical, biblical, developmental, edu- 
cational and organizational. 
R Anderson MWT/i 2-3:30 Foil 

NPTSMNST-135 

Adult Ministries in the Church 

Adult development and the theology and opera- 
tional principles of adult ministry in the church 
and community are the foci for this course. Various 
ministry models and resources will be examined 
and evaluated. 
Banlcs 11/27-12/8 8-12 Fcdl Post-Term 



NPTS MNST-241 
Leadership in Youth Ministry 

Surveys current thought on the spiritual formation 
of the leader. Attention will be given to spiritual 
disciplines, marriage and ministry, avoidance of 
stress and burnout and strategies for personal 
growth and development. 
R.W. Johnston 10/20-21 FoU 

NETS ED 302 

Teaching Ministry of the Church 

This is a basic course in Christian Education which 
utilizes five contemporary approaches to the prac- 
tice of educational ministry. Students learn a basic 
instructional model and lead a peer group in a 
learning experience. Curricula resources of 
American Baptist Churches/USA and Christian 
Education: Shared Approaches are critiqued in 
learning centers. 
Marris/Scobk W 7-9:40 P.M. FaU 

NETS ED 302H 

El Ministerio Educativo de las Iglesias Hispanas 

(Educational Ministry of Hispanic Churches) 

Este curso intenta desarrollar una comprension de 
los fundamentos biblico-teologicos, sicol6gicos, 
filosoficos y socio-culturales del ministereio educa- 
tivo en contexto hispano. Tanto los materiales 
educativos en uso como la realidad eclesiastica his- 
pana, seran considerados en busqueda de un minis- 
terio contextual relevante. Se enfatizara la practica, 
reflexion y dialogo educativos. 
Schipani Sec. ITh 3-5:40 Fall 

Schipani Sec . 2 Th 7 -9 .40 P.M. Fall 

NBTS ED 304 

Teaching Methods and Practice 

Students will learn how to plan, lead and evaluate 
educational events and how to serve as educational 
consultants. On-site teaching will be videotaped 
for self-evaluation. A Saturday teacher- training 



55 



Educational Ministry 

workshop will be planned and conducted for a local 

church. Videotaping fee. 

Morris 9118-22 FottPre-Term 

NETS ED 414 
Teaching Preschoolers 

Students will negotiate individual or team-teaching 
assignments in the Child Development Center. 
Pre-teaching consultants and post-teaching evalua- 
tions are designed to lead to improvement of teach- 
ing skills. Reading and experience are integrated in 
a final paper. Prereq: Advance permission of the 
instructor. Videotape fee. Additional fee: $25.00. 
Moms/TBA TBA Faiminter/Spring 



Polity and Canon Law 

NETS ED 415 

Research on the Young Child 

Students will negotiate individual or group 
research projects involving reading and observation 
of and/or interviews with children in the Child 
Development Center. Projects must be approved 
before the beginning of the quarter. May be repeat- 
ed for up to 6 credits. Fee: $25.00. 
Morris/TBA TBA FoIWrmer/SpriTig 



VII. POLITY AND 
CANON LAW 



56 



Old Testament 



WINTER 1990 
BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

CTU B 480 
Biblical Spirituality 

A survey of narrative passages in both Testaments 
which represent in story form the various faith per- 
spectives life-struggles, images of God, and inspira- 
tion for prayer articulated by the believing commu- 
nity: deuteronomic, historic, prophetic, sapiential, 
apocalyptic, synoptic, Johannine, and Pauline. 
Rosenbhu MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

CTU B 492 

Sickness, Disability and Healing in the Bible 

Traditions about sickness, disability and healing are 
examined across the Old and New Testaments as a 
means of reflecting on contemporary attitudes to 
these subjects. Helpful for relating medicine, 
spiritism and theology, for shame and prejudice in 
society, for sickness as an apostolate and as an 
object of healing. 
StuhlmueUer M 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU B 541 

Biblical Fundamentalism 

A seminar focusing on the origins of fundamental- 
ism and its approach to the Bible. An attempt to 
describe a pastoral response to the fundamentalist 
theological stance. 
Hoppe MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

MTS B-300 

Introduction to Biblical Studies 

(For course description, see fall.) 

Hilgert T 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 



OLD TESTAMENT 

1. INTRODUCTORY 



CTU B 300 

Old Testament Introduction 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Bergcmt ( A) MW 1041:15 

Bowe (B)T 7-9:30 P.M. 

G-ETS 11-501 

Old Testament Interpretation: 

Pentateuch and Former Prophets 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
TEA WF9-iO:50 



Winter 
Winter 



G-ETS 11-502 

Old Testament Interpretation: 

Latter Prophrts and Writings 

Introduction to the critical, historical and theologi- 
cal study of the Hebrew Scriptures, with emphasis 
on the development of interpretive skilk in the 
Latter Prophets (Isaiah-Malachi) and the Writings 
(Psalms-Chronicles); additional study in intertesta- 
mental writings (Apocrypha, Dead Sea Scrolls, 
Josephus, Philo). Limit: 30. (Exegetical sections 
required.) 
Nash T 6-8:50 P.M. Winter 

LSTCB-310 

Pentateuch and Historical Bo<^s 

Literary, historical, and theological studies in these 
books of the Old Testament. Designed to be the 
introductory course in field. 
Michel MF 1141:50; W 11:15-12:05 Winter 

LSTCB.310/MTSB-405 

Pentateuch and Historical BooksATie Yahwist 

Revolution: Introduction to the Old Testament 

An introduction to essential historical, exegetical 
and hermeneutical questions dealing with the 
Hebrew Scriptures and analysis of the origin, 
growth, and canonical shape of Genesis- 2 Kings, 
with attention to particular biblical texts, involv- 
ing an LSTC/MTS cooperative learning experi- 
ence. 

Campbelimein Mll-ll :50; Winter 

Wn:l542:05;F 10:4542:05 

NPTSBIBL421 
Old Testament Faith II 

The monarchy and the prophetic literature are the 

major themes covered in lectures and discussions. 

Continued emphasis is placed on the relationship 

of this material to Judaism and Christianity. Prereq: 

BIBL-120. 

Holmgren MTWTh9:l540:25 Winter 

NBTS OT 302 

Old Testament Literature 

This course is an introduction to the Old 
Testament as literature. Attention is given to vari- 
ous methodologies used in interpreting the Old 
Testament such as text-, form-, redaction- and lit- 
erature-criticism. The various literary forms are 
studied as carriers of the ancient Hebrew faith and 
revelation. 
Mariottini T 7-9:40 P.M. Winter 



Winter 



57 



Old Testament 

IL CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B 415 
Later Prophecy 

A study of selected texts from exilic and post-exilic 
prophets. Emphasis on the changing nature of the 
prophet's vocation, the re-interpretation of earlier 
traditions and the origins of messianism. 
Hoope MW 1 1 -3042:45 Winter 

CTU B 425 
Wisdom Literature 

A study of the wisdom theology with its emphasis 
on human behavior. Primary focus will be on the 
themes of creation, suffering, birth and death, retri- 
bution and immortality as found within the wisdom 
literature. 
Bergant TTh 10 A 1 : 15 Winter 

LSTC B'630 

Graduate Biblical Seminar II; 

The Prophets 

An ongoing seminar on the prophetic materials. 
Theme for 1990: Second Isaiah. Review of research 
in this area, methodological considerations, student 
papers on special topics. (For post-M.Div. students. 
Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Michel M 12:304 Winter 

MS B334 

Pre-Exilic Prophets (OT) 

Pre-exilic Prophets will examine the development 
of the institution of prophecy paying close atten- 
tion to the southern prophets of the seventh and 
eighth century. We will examine the writings of 
Isaiah of Jerusalem and Jeremiah in an attempt to 
show the basis of the conflict between Royal 
Davidic theology and Deuteronomic theology. 
Schoenstene TBA Winter 



111. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

BTS B<324 

Exegesis in the Hebrew Bible: 

Genesis and Esther 

This course will use a study of Genesis and Esther 
to teach historical and literary exegetical method- 
ology. Some of the class will be in a workshop for- 
mat to assist students in working with an individual 
text. The class will also use developing exegetical 
skills with the narrative of Esther. 
Roop 1/22-3116 WF 7:45-9:25 Winter 



LSTC B-304 
Biblical Aramaic 

Introduction to the Aramaic language; translation 
of portions of the Aramaic sections of the Old 
Testament. Prereq: Hebrew. 
Fuerst MF 9-9;50; W 8:45-9:35 Winter 

NPTSBIBL236 

Resources for Preaching and Teaching 

from the Old Testament 

The basis for faculty-student presentations will be 

texts selected from the ecumenical lectionary. 

Homiletical-devotional writings of Jewish and 

Christian leaders will be read and discussed. Prereq: 

BIBL-120andBlBL-121. 

Holmgren W 7-10 P.M. Wrtrxer 

S^WTS 01^606S 

Studies in Israelite Wisdom and Hymnody: 

The Psalms of Israel 

This introduction to the Psalms will have a dual 
focus: an examination of the Psalm categories, their 
possible settings and uses and of the Old 
Testament traditions seen in the Psalms and a con- 
sideration of the use of the Psalms in public wor- 
ship and private devotions. 
Garvey TTK9 -10:50 Winter 

TEDS OT706 
Geography of Bible Lands 

Physical geography of Palestine including natural 
regions, political units, geographical history since 
antiquity, identification of ancient sites and a 
description of the present state of excavation at 
each tell or location. 
Beitzel TBA Wiraer 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

CTU B 325 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I 

This is the first part of a two-quarter course which 
studies the grammar and vocabulary of biblical 
Hebrew in order to prepare students to work with 
the Hebrew text. 
Hoppe TTh 1 1 :30-l 2:45 Winter 

G-ETS 11-641 
Elementary Hebrew I 

Introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew 

(grammar and syntax) and translation of selected 

prose texts in the Hebrew Bible. Two unit course: 

credit for 11-641 upon satisfactory completion of 

11-642. 

Nash 2/5-3/10 MWTh 1:30-3:20 Winter 



58 



Old Testament 



New Testament 



LSTC B-300B 
Hebrew Grammar I 

(For descricpion, see Fall Pre'Term.) 
TBA MTWTK 8-8:50 



NEW TESTAMENT 



Winter 



LSTCB-301 
Hebrew Grammar 11 

A continuation of Hebrew Grammar I taught in 

Fall Pre-term. 

Fuerst UW230'^:45 Wmer 



MTSB-417 

Hebrew Exegesis: The Book of Deuteronomy 

The goal of this course is to read selected portions 
of Deuteronomy in Hebrew, with attention to 
grammar, syntax, and the distinctive style and 
vocabulary of the book. The theology of 
Deuteronomy, especially in regard to law, wisdom, 
covenant, election and holiness will be examined 
and compared with other Pentateuchal traditions. 
Prereq: Hebrew I and II. 
Tavzer TTh 104 1:50 Winter 



NPTS BlBL-101 
Hebrew Readings 

Following the completion of a study of Hebrew 
grammar and the verb system, which was begun in 
Elementary Hebrew (BIBL-100), readings from the 
Hebrew Bible are assigned. Four hours. 
Holmgren MTWTK 2-3 Winter 

NPTS BIB1^103 
Intermediate Hebrew 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-102). 



Koptak 



TBA 



Winter 



NBTS BL 302H 

Hebreo 11 (Hebrew 11) 

Este curso es el segundo trimestre de una serie de 

dos trimestres. Vea BL 301 H para una descripcion. 

Homing MTh 1-2:20 Winter 

TEDS OT845 

Poetry in the Pentateuch 

A study of the use of poetry discourse in the com- 
position of biblical narratives. The course will focus 
on the final shape of the Pentateuch as a narrative 
and the contribution of Genesis 49, Numbers 23- 
24 and Deuteronomy 32-33 to its theology. 
SaiMmer TBA Winter 



L INTRODUCTORY 




CTU B 305 




New Testament Introduction 




(For course description, see Fall.) 




Reid (A) M 7-9:30 P.M. 


Winter 


Bowe (B)MW 8:30-9:45 


Winter 



GTS CH 321 
Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the origin, interrelationship, and intent 
of the three synoptic gospels. Special attention is 
given to the form and function of a gospel. 
Snyder UW 1 1 :204 2:40 Winter 

G-ETS 12-501 

New Testament Interpretation: Gospels 

Theory and practice of exegesis in relation to 
selected passages, including textual, literary, form- 
and redaction-criticism and the use of programmed 
instruction. Exploration of the theology of the 
evangelists. Presentation of various viewpoints 
through team-taught lectures and exegetical sec- 
tions meetings in groups. Limit: 45, Winter; 30, 
Spring. 

Stegner MW 5:30-7:20 P.M. Winter 

Roth MW 5:30-7:20 P.M. Spring 

(Lecture + Discussion groups) 

LSTCB.331 
Gospel Traditions 

A study of the content of the four gospels and die 
way each author structured and edited the tradition 
so as to respond to specific needs of the church. 
Students will be introduced to the history of gospel 
study and given practice in the use of contempo- 
rary critical methods. Prereq: Greek- 
Linss TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

M 2:30-3:20 or F 8-8:50 disc^sec. 

Rhoads TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

UarT 2:30-3:20 disc. sec. 

NPTS BlBL-150 

Interpreting the New Testament 1: 

The Gospels 

(For course description, see F^ll.) 

Snodgrass MWTh 8-9: 1 Winter 

NPTS BlBL-250 

Interpreting the New Testament 11: 

Acts and Epistles 

The Book of Acts and selected epistles are exam- 
ined to gain ir\sight into the New Testament and to 



59 



New Testament 



understand the emergence of the early Church. 
BeUeviUe MWT/i 1 1 :4542:55 Winter 

BeUeviUe T7A0PM. Winter 

NETS NT 301 
Matthew, Mark and Luke 

This course is a general introduction to the distinc- 
tive character of each of the three Synoptic 
Gospels with attention to the issues of sources and 
interrelationships and to the common themes of 
the Synoptics as witnesses to the life and teachings 
of Jesus (e.g., baptism, death, resurrection, miracles, 
parables, Kingdom of God, discipleship). 
Cosgrove TTh 1-2:20 Winter 



11. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-436 

Acts of the Apostles 

A study other book of Acts with special attention 
to the literary genre of Luke- Acts, the shape and 
function of the stories the author narratives, and 
the overarching understanding of the role the 
church plays in the drama of biblical history. 
Gardner 1122-3116 WF 7:45-9:25 Winxex 

CTU B 440 

The Gospel According to John 

The Gospel will be studied according to its distinc- 
tive style and theology, its overall structure and 
content. Key sections will be used to highlight such 
major Johannine motifs as religious symbolism, 
sacraments, community and spirituality. 
^o^erhhit MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

Ro%erhhit W 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

CTU B 452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

A study of the life and thought of Paul in his cul- 
tural and theological setting. Pauline motife such as 
law and freedom, charism and Spirit, death and res- 
urrection, Church and apostleship will be exam- 
ined in selected letters, with a view to their mes- 
sage for the contemorary Church. 
Rod Tl-y30 Winter 

Bowe UW 1 1 :30-l2:45 Spring 

LSTCB-445 

Greek Exegesis in Luke's Gospel 

Emphasis on translation of the Greek text, exegeti- 
cal method, and theological and ethical themes. 
Henrich UW 1-2:15 Winter 



MTS B-403 
Paul 

An introduction to the seven authentic Pauline 
letters. Course goals: 1. to know these documents 
well (content, genre, argumentative structure and 
rhetorical situation); 2. to gain an awareness of the 
theological, political and social issues Paul faced in 
his churches, and to reflect upon points of similari- 
ty and dissimiliarity with the church today. 
Mitchell MW 2-3:50 Winter 

MTSB^OSK 

The Epistles of Paul (Taught in Korean) 

An introduction to the context and content of the 
Pauline letters. The basic themes of the letters in 
relation to their Graeco-Roman context will be 
examined. The relation and meaning of these 
themes for die Church's life today will be discussed. 
C.Pork TBA Winter 

MTSB.418 
Apocalypse of John 

A study of the Johannine apocalypse in its literary, 
social, and political context. Investigation of its 
symbols and myths in the history of religions. 
Reflections upon its contemporary import. 
Weham T 1-3:50 Winter 

NPTS BIBLES? 
The Gospel of John 

An exegetical treatment of the fourth gospel in 
which its distinctive style and thought are ana- 
lyzed. Attention will be given to the improvement 
of exegetical skills. Prereq: Greek. 
Belleville UW 2-3:30 Winter 

NPTS BlBLa78 
Revelation 

Exegetical study of the New Testament Apocalypse 
of John. Attention to issues of genre, historical set- 
ting, purpose, cultural-religious contexts and the 
variety of theological interpretations of Revelation. 
Scholer Th2-5 Winter 

NBTS NT 336 
Revelation 

This course is an exegetical study of the New 
Testament Apocalypse of John. Attention is given 
to issues of genre, historical setting, purpose, cul- 
tural-religious contexts and the variety of theologi- 
cal interpretations of Revelation. 
D Schokr M 2:30-5:10 Winter 

S-WTS 02-61 IS 

The Gospel According to Saint Mark 

Interpretation of the English text of "The Earliest 



60 



New Testament 



Gospel" in its historical context. Lecture and dis- 
cussion. 
Pervo WF 940:50 Winter 

TEDS NT706 
Romans 

Stress on the theology of Paul, with consideration 

of the distinctive emphasis of the epistle: Paul's 

teaching on Judaism, salvation history, the power 

of sin, righteousness, the Holy Spirit, and the 

future of Israel. Prereq: reading knowledge of 

GreeL 

Moo TBA Winter 



IIL SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B'338 

Gospel and the Gospels 

This course examines how continuity is present in 
charge as the Gospel of Jesus Christ is differently 
proclaimed by Matthew, Mark, Luke and later min- 
isters in all the ages and places where the church is 
present as Jesus Christ's living body. 
Meyer 1/2-13 TSMF8-iJ Winter 

CTUB521 

Liturgy of the Synagogue II 

The Liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh 

Hashanah, Yom Kippur. 

Perelmuter TTh lO-l 1 : 15 Winter 

CTU B 535 

Resurrection in the New Testament 

A study o the earliest Church's faith in the resur- 
rection through investigation of the Gospel 
accounts and other New Testament passages as well 
as the earliest noncanonical texts. Attention will 
be given to interpretive method. 
Osiek T 10-12:30 Winter 

CTS CH 432 
Parables of Jesus 

Survey of the variety of ways in which the parables 
of Jesus have been interpreted with emphasis on 
methodology of contemporary literary criticism and 
its application. Settings of the parables in the mis- 
sion and message of Jesus, in early Christian tradi- 
tion and in the synoptic Gospels will also be con- 
sidered. 
Aune W 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 



LSTC B^660 

Graduate Biblical Seminar V: Paul 

An on going seminar on the Pauline materials. 

Theme for 1990: Aspects of Pauline ecclesiology. 

Concentration on Corinthians, Ephesians, 

Colossians, and the Pastoral Epistles. (For post- 

M.Div. students. Admission of others by consent of 

instructor.) 

Kreruz T 1:30-5 Winter 

NBTS NT 450 

New Testament Theology 

This course is designed to introduce the discipline 
of New Testament theology from the perspective of 
its history and task and to provide an overview of 
the various theological perspectives represented in 
its writings. Special attention will be devoted to 
the question of the unity of New Testament theolo- 
gy. Prereq: OT 301, NT 301, NT 302. 
Cosgrove Th 7 -9:40 P.M. Winter 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

BTS B-3 16B/NBTS BL 35 1 
New Testament Greek 11 

This course is the continuation of B-316A New 

Testament Greek I. 

TBA WF 1-2:20 Winter 

G-ETS 12-642 
Elementary Greek VIl 

Essential forms and principles of New Testament 
Greek. Two-unit course, credit for 12-641 after sat- 
isfactory completion of 12-642. 
Weryiland/Stegner TWThF 8-8:50 Winter 

LSTCB'339 
Greek Readings 

Designed for those who have had an introductory 
Greek course, this course will continue the study of 
Greek grammar, based on the reading of selected 
parts of the Greek New Testament. 
Linss TF 2:30-3:45 Winter 

MTS B.324/325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek 1, 11 

Study of elementary Greek grammar, practice in 
translation, with introductory attention to exegesis. 
A non-divisible course of two quarters. 
MitcheR Sec. I : MTWTh 9-9:50 Winter 

Hilgert Sec. 2: TF 2-3:50 Winter 

MitcheU Sec. I : MTWTh 9-9:50 Spring 

Hilgert Sec. 2: TF 2-3:50 Spring 



61 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



MTS B-324K 

Introduction to New Testament Greek I 

(Taught in Korean) 

A study of elementary Greek grammar practice in 
translation, with introductory attention to exegesis. 
A non-divisible two-quarter sequence. 
C.Park Ml'30'3-30 Winter 

NPTSBlBL-113 

New Testament Greek Readings 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-112) 



Snodgrass 



TBA 



S-WTS02-521S/02-522S 
Elementary Greek I and II 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Pervo MTWT/i 3-3:50 



HISTORICAL 
STUDIES 

I, INTRODUCTORY 



Winter 



Winter 



origins of Protestantism. (Discussion sections 

required.) 

Suin MTh I '303:20 Winter 

Stein WF 940:50 Sfmng 

LSTCH-310 

Early and Medieval Church History 

A basic introduction to Christian history and the- 
ology until the Reformation. Lectures and discus- 
sions of primary sources by both men and women of 
the early and medieval periods. 
JurissonlRorem M 9-9:50; W 8:45-9:35 Winter 
F 8-8:50 or 9-9:50 disc. sec. 

NPTSHISTUO 

Christian Heritage I: 

The Early Medieval Church 

A basic introduction is provided by this course to 
the history of the Christian church from apostolic 
times through the Middle Ages, with emphasis on 
the expansion of the church, persons, institutional 
growth and theological development. 
Graham MWTh J 1:45-1 2:55 Winter 



CTU H 302 

Early Expansic»i of Christianity 

A study is made of the experience of the Church in 
mission as it encounters new cultures and changes 
from being a Jewish community into a Graeco- 
Roman community. Institutional, doctrinal and 
devotional developments are considered. 
Nemer TTh 1 1 :30'12:45 Winter 

CTS CH 344 

History of Christian Thought 1 

From the early church to late medieval period. A 
survey of significant theological movements, with 
attention to their social context. The theme of 
redemption will provide focus. To be followed in 
Spring by CH 345 History of Christian Thought II: 
from the Reformation through the nineteenth cen- 
tury. 
Staff TBA Winter 

G-ETS 13-501 
History of Christianity 1 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Groh TTh 9-10:50 Winter 

G-ETS 13-502 

History of Christianity II 

Major issues, ideas, events, and persons in the his- 
tory of the church from the eleventh century 
through the eighteenth century, with special 
emphasis on the late medieval Christianity and the 



NPTSHIST113 
Church History Survey 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Graham MW2-4 



Winter 



NBTSCH301 

Early and Medieval Christianity 

This course is an examination of issues and devel- 
opments in Christian life and thought from the 
begirming of the second century to the time of the 
Reformation. Regular and intensive reading, both 
in primary and secondary sources, is emphasized as 
a basis for meaningful classroom discussion. 
Webber M 2:30-5:10 Winter 

S-WTS 03-502S 

General Church History 11: 

The Medieval Church 

A survey of the life and thought of the Christian 
church from Gregory the Great to the Renaissance. 
TBA TTK 1-2:50 Winter 



II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

G-ETS 40-671 

Uiuted Methodist Studies 1: 

John Wesley 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Tuttk 2/53/10 MWTh 1 :303:20 Winter 



62 



Historical Studies 



G-ETS 40-672 

United Methodist Studies II: 

Nineteenth Century 

Evangelistic thrust, social concern, institutional 
development, and theological shifts of the parent 
bodies of the United Methodist Church, from the 
formulation of organizational structures among 
Methodists, United Brethren, and Evangelicals 
from 1814 onwards. Attention to the role of 
women. Blacks, Asians, Indians, to peace issues, to 
the Social Gospel and the fundamentalist contro- 
versy (one unit). 
Coson/Stetn 2/5-3/10 MWTh 1:30-3:20 Winter 

LSTCH-360 

Lutheran Confessional Heritage 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Pero MW 1-2:15 Winter 

MTS/LSTCH-417 

Latin American and Caribbean Church History 

An exploration of the development of Christianity 
in Latin America, covering the colonial and post- 
independence periods. Principal emphasis is placed 
upon the two fundamental projects of evangeliza- 
tion: Roman Catholic and Protestant. The docu- 
ments from these two experiences are used to ana- 
lyze not only the events of church history, but the 
theologies, ecclesiologies, and anthropologies that 
underlay their practices. The course will seek to 
assess how the history of Latin American 
Christianity has continued to shape the distinctive 
character of Hispanic churches in the United 
States. 
Rodriguez-Diaz W I -3 :50 Winter 

M/LH394 

Unitarian Universalist History 

An introduction to Unitarian Universalist history, 
focused toward preparing ministers to help congre- 
gations become aware of the heritage of liberal reli- 
gion. Brief introductioris to Polish, Transylvanian, 
and English Unitarianism and Universalism will 
precede the major emphasis of the course, which 
will be on American Unitarianism and 
Universalism. 
Godbey TBA ■ Winter 

U/L H 440 

The Enlightenment and Liberal Theology 

A critical study of the Enlightenment and its influ- 
ence on the emergence of liberal theology. We 
shall examine selected major philosophical and 
theological works and differing interpretations of 
the Enlightenment, with specific attention to an 
evaluation of the influence of Enlightenment views 



on contemporary religious thought Each student 
will prepare and present a paper on a major thinker 
of issue. 
Godbey TBA Winter 

NETS CH 461 
Denominational Heritage 

This course is intended to meet the requirements of 

denominational heritage for non-Baptists. Readings 

and assignments will be individually tailored for 

each student. Class sessions will vary according to 

the configuration of the students. Prereq: CH 302 

orCH303. 

Dayton M 9:30-1 2: J Winter 

S-WTS 03-6058 

Studies in Episcopal Church History 

A seminar designed to explore significant develop- 
ments in the life of the Episcopal Church in the 
United States and its missionary off-shoots against 
the background of die wider scene of religion, cul- 
ture, and society. Issues and problems to be consid- 
ered include structures and organizations, mission 
strategy and objectives, theological controversy and 
ecumenicity. 
Haugaard WF 9-1 0:50 Winter 



IL HISTORY ^ INDIVIDUALS 

G-ETS 13-602 
Augustine 

The life and theology of Augustine according to his 

writings and his times. Limit: 15. 

Groh Th 1:30-4:30 Winter 

LSTCH-435 
Theology of Luther 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the stu- 
dent to Luther's theology in its broad comprehen- 
siveness and its dynamic thrust. Selected works in 
various categories are discussed. 
Hendel M 8:30-9:45; W 8:15-9:30 Winter 

LSTCH-640 

Pseudo'Dionysius and Maximus the Confessor 

A seminar on the writings of Dionysius the Pseudo- 
Areopagite and Maximus the Confessor, with spe- 
cial attention given to their relationship and to 
their liturgical theology. Examination of Greek 
texts. (For Tli.M. and Th.D. students; others only 
by permission of the instructor.) 
Rorem W 2:30-5 Winter 



63 



Historical Studies 



MTSH^Ol 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

A systematic study of Calvin's theology as seen pri- 
marily in the Institutes of the Christian Religion. 
Burhhart MW 104 1 :50 Winter 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

CTUH416 

The American Catholic Experience: 

1918 to Present 

The main problems and solutions of the American 
Catholic community: immigration, acculturation, 
education, social questions, anti-Catholicism, 
Church and State, adaptability to nationalism, the- 
ology and discipline before and after Vatican II. 
Ross UW2-30'3:45 Winter 

CTS CH 382AiTS H 330 

History of the Black Church in North America 

This course examines the appropriation and devel- 
opment of Christianity from the slavery era to the 
present by Black North Americans through the 
study of the historical development of Black 
Christian traditions and movements. 
Daniels M 6:30'9:30 P.M. Winter 

G-ETS 13-642 

Selected Topics in American Religious History: 

Religion and the American Way 

Examination of significant issues, movements, and 

persons. Prereq: 13-502 or 503. 

Murphy 2/5-311 M WTH J .-30-3 :20 Winter 

LSTC H-350A 
American Church History 

The development of religious ideas, movements, 
and institutions in North America from colonial 
times to the present. TTie variety of religious 
expressions in the United States is discussed, with 
special emphasis on American Lutheranism. 
]Urisson UF 11-11 :50; W 11:154 2:05 Winter 

MTS H-323 

American Christianity and Modernity 

This foundational course explores the historical 
transformation of Christianity in the United States 
through its encounter with modernity from the 
colonial era to the present and surveys the relation- 
ship between historical shifts and developments in 
American Christianity — renewal movements, 
theological trends, liturgical currents and social 
reform movements. 
Daniels MW 104 1 :50 Winter 



MSH372 

Issues in Twentieth Century American 

Catholicism 

This course will examine some of the issues which 
American Catholics faced during the twentieth 
century. Through directed readings, classroom dis- 
cussions, and presentations, students will be able to 
gain a greater appreciation of the contributions of 
American Catholics to twentieth century 
American life. 
Zielinski TBA Winter 



V. SELECT TOPICS IN 
CHURCH HISTORY 

CTU H307 

The Christiaiuzation of Europe 

A study of the conversion of the peoples outside 
the Roman Empire to Christianity and the transi- 
tion from the early Christian to the medieval 
world. Major consideration will be given to the 
development of the medieval church, the relations 
between East and West, religious life and the histo- 
ry of theology from 450-1250. 
McGonigle MW 1041:15 Winter 

G-ETS 13-644 

Oral History Seminary: Reclaiming 

the Church's Stories 

Introduction to the theory and methods of oral his- 
torical research: guidance in carrying through a 
specific oral history project. Prereq: 13-501, 502 or 
503. Intensive. 

Murphy 1/84119 TWThF 940:50 Winter 
&MTWTh 1:304:30 

LSTC H-469 

History of Christianity in Southeast Asia 

A survey of the history and current challenges of 
the Christian church in Southeast Asia, with spe- 
cial attention to the church in Indonesia. 
Nyhus TTh 2:30-3:45 Winter 

LSTCH-601 

Graduate Historical Seminar 

A seminar for Th.M./Th.D. students on the history 
and philosophy of historical studies in general and 
church history in particular, the methods and tools 
of the field, and some practical mechanics of 
research, writing, editing and publishing. 
Hendel M 1-3:30 Winter 



64 



Historical Studies 



Theological Stud 



les 



NPTS HSTX'246; THEO-246 
Sacraments in the Early Church 

Historical and theological developments of the 
sacraments of baptism and the Lord's Supper in the 
church from their beginnings to the middle of the 
third century A.D. Attention to issues of Jewish and 
Graeco-Roman contexts with reference to the ori- 
gins and developments and theological debates 
over the meaning of the sacraments. 
Schder W 2-5 Winter 

TEDS CH752 

The Reformation Era 

Historical and theological overview of the changes 
in the history of Western Christendom through 
Luther's rediscovery of the Gospel. Topics covered 
include the condition of the late medieval church; 
the Lutheran, Zwinglian and Calvinist reforma- 
tions; the rise of Anglicanism; the Anabaptists and 
'left-wing' movement; and the Counter- 
Reformation. 
Nettles TBA Winter 



THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

1. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

BTS T-378 
Narrative Theology 

Drawing upon narrative theology writings and 
approaches, this course explores ways the story of 
God's presence in and through the life of Jesus 
Christ intersects with and illuminiates our every- 
day experience. Each student presents several con- 
structive statements of belief in narrative style for 
class review and discussion. 
Groff l/22'3n6WF 10:40-12:20 Winter 

CTU T 325 
Introducticm to Theology 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Bevans TTK 8:30-9:45 Winter 

GTS CH 344 

History of Christian Thought 1 

(For course description, see Historical Studies I.) 
Staff TBA Winter 

G-ETS 21-501 
Systematic Theology I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Young 2/5-3/1 TTh 6-8 :50 P.M . Winter 



G'ETS 21-502 
Systematic Theology II 

Christian understanding of Jesus the Christ, salva- 
tion, the Holy Spirit, church, ministry, and sacra- 
ments. Prereq: 21-501. Limit: 35. 
Wm MTh 1:30-3:20 Winter 

Young WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCT-312 
Christian Theology 11 

For description of the Christian Theology 
sequence, see Christian Theology I. The second 
course in the sequence deals with the human con- 
dition (including sin and evil) and the Person and 
Work of Christ. 

Braaten U n-l2:l5;W 11:15-12:30 Winter 

Hefner M 11-12:15;W 11:15-12:30 Winter 

¥11-11:50 disc. sec. 

MTS T-300 

Introduction to Christian Theology 

An introduction to the contents, methods, and 
resources of coherent and responsible Christian 
thinking. Attention will be given to understanding 
and interpreting basic Christian doctrines (e.g., 
God, Christ, Spirit, Church). The course will 
include lectures, discussions, readings, and special 
projects. 
Burkhart/Case-Winter/Parker TTh I O-l 1 :50 Winter 

MTS 1-478 

Seminar on Research Methods 

Designed for M.A.T.S. and M.Div. students, this 
seminar teaches both the "how to" of effective 
argumentation and examines, criticizes and models 
selected methodologies from the biblical, historical, 
theological and ministries fields. The course project 
is a research proposal, developed and carefully 
refined throughout the seminar. Limit: 15. Prereq: 
preliminary coursework in three of the above-men- 
tioned disciplines. 
CaMwell/Tanzer Wl-3:50 Winter 

NPTS THEO-201 

Foundational Doctrines: Human Existence 

This course will explore human existence as bear- 
ing the image and likeness of God. The human 
beings as creature, sinner, and saint will be the 
focus of exegetical, philosophical, and sociological 
considerations. 
Weborg M 2-5 Winter 

NPTS THEO-301 
Systematic Theology 11 

The foundation of human existence, salvation and 
hope in the triune God whose work is creation, 
redemption and sanctification. 
Weborg MWTh9:l5-lO:25 Winter 



65 



Theological Studies 



NETS TH 302 
Christian Theology 11 

A continuation of the three-quarter sequence 

begun in TH 301 and concluding in TH 303. This 

course covers the doctrines of revelation, God as 

trinity, creation, and the person and work, of Jesus 

Christ. 

J. Jones M 7-9:40 P.M. Winter 

NETS TH 302H 

Teologia Cristiana 11: Una Perspectiva 
Praxeol6gica (Christian Theology 11: A 
Praxeological Perspective) 

Este curso, desde la perspectiva de una episte- 
mologia praxeologica, analizara los mas impor- 
tantes acercamientos metodologicos en teologia 
(protestante cldsico, liberal, neo-ortodoxo, politico, 
catolico clisico, liberacidn) en su consideracion de 
los afirmaciones fundamenCales de la fe. Se estudiara 
como, epistemologias implicitas o explicitas, gener- 
an diferentes metodos y resultan en discursos diver- 
sos. Prereq: TH 301H, equivalente, o permiso del 
instructor. 
Mottesi T 6-8:40 P.M. Winter 



11. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

BTS T-455 

Seminar: Anabaptism and Pietism 

Deriving themes for primary sources, the seminar 
will examine both the continuities and discontinu- 
ities between the theologies of the sixteenth centu- 
ry radical reformation and the seventeenth century 
reform movement in German Protestantism. The 
goal is to discern the relevancy of these movements 
to the need for continuing the Church's reforma- 
tion. 
Brown 1 122-3/1 6 T 6:30- J P.M . Winter 

CTU T 520 

Theology of Karl Rahner 

A study of the major themes of Rahner's theology 
with particular emphasis on the philosophical ori- 
entation that shapes this style of theological reflec- 
tion. 
Hayes MW 2:30-3 :45 Winter 

CTU T 576 
Black Theology 

This seminar will explore the meaning, methods, 
content and development of Black theology in the 
African-American context and its dialogue with 
other liberation theologies on the third world. 



Students will critically reflect on God's revelation 
in Jesus Christ as it is interpreted from the pespec- 
tive of the African-American socio-political situa- 
tion in life. 
Phelps T 1-3:30 Winter 

MS S413 

Karl Rahner's Foundations of Christian Faith 

A guided tour through Karl Krahner's masterful 
attempt to integrate all of Christian theology by 
exploring notions of transcendence, uncreated 
grace, the human existential, revelation and under- 
standing, ascending Christology and the anony- 
mous Christian. This is done with a constant pas- 
toral orientation. 
Meyer TBA Winter 

NPTS THEO-144 
Theology of Karl Barth 

This seminar course will provide an introduction to 

the theology of Karl Barth by reading selections 

from the Church Dogmatics, especially Volume 4, 

concentrating on themes of Christology and soteri- 

ology. 

Dayton M 7- JO P.M. Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

BTS T-439 

Theology of Urban Church 

This course will study the mission of urban congre- 
gations and the possibility of church renewal in 
areas of massive change and dramatic separation 
into divided racial and ethnic communities. 
Content will be based on case studies that tell the 
story with sociological analysis and theological 
reflections. 
Wagner 1/2-13 T-S, M-F 8-J 1 Winter 

CTU T 430 

The Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Bevans (A) W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

Szura (B) TTh lO-l 1 :15 Winter 

CTU T 440 
Christology 

A study of the foundational questions of 
Christology in the light of the critical, historical 
study of Scripture and the theological tradition. 
Hayes MWlO-ll:l5 Winter 



66 



Theological Studies 



CTU T 441 
Christology and Cultures 

A study of how the confession of Jesus Christ inter- 
acts with cultural processes. Special attention is 
given to the New Testament and patristic periods, 
and also to contemporary movements in the world 
Church today. 
Schreiter MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU T 445 

Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church and its rela- 
tion to the biblical witness. Particular attention 
will be given to tradition and history in the devel- 
opment of the Church and its ministries. 
Linnan MW 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU T 523 

Theological Developments in the 

Nineteenth Century 

This seminar will consider the issues arising in 
Roman Catholic Modernism. Particular attention 
will be given to French and English theologians in 
the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 
Linnan TTh 1 1 :30'12:45 Winter 

CTS TEC 405 

Afro-American Intellectual History 

This seminar will examine problems, challenges 
and issues in the development of Afro/ American 
critical thought from slavery to the present. 
Dyson M 2-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 501 
Selfhood 

A seminar considering psychological, philosophi- 
cal, and theological dimensions of the problem of 
selfhood. 
LeFevre W 942:40 Winter 

CTS TEC 496 
Seminar on Violence 

Exploration of contemporary struggles with the 
issue of violence in revolutionary situations, in the 
American peace movement, in the women's move- 
ment and in the Third World situation. Special ref- 
erence to the use of political violence in the strug- 
gles with liberation. 
Thistlethwaite/Dyson T 9-12:40 Winter 

G-ETS 21-603 

Seminar in Contemporary Christology 

Discussion of contemporary thought about 

Christological issues. 

WiU T 6-8:50 P.M. Winter 



LSTC T-456 

Epic of Creation: Scientific and Biblical 

Perspectives on our Origins 

This course will present the story of the origir\s and 
development of the universe, life, and humans. 
Participants will be encouraged to develop (1) an 
understanding of the relation between contempo- 
rary scientific and theological perspectives on our 
place in the scheme of things, and (2) interpreta- 
tions of the scientific and religious materials in 
ways which take the former seriously and yet are 
fruitful for conmiunicating the faith of the latter. 
Gilbert, Staff W 7-9:50 p.m. Winter 

LSTC T-530 

Theology as Confession and 

as Academic Discipline 

An examination of modem cases of Christian con- 
fession in situations of oppression in Europe, the 
Americas, Africa and Asia, with an eye to how the- 
ological truth is thus advanced and verified, by 
comparison with the academic tradition of theolo- 
gy as "science." 
Bertram T 7-9:50 P.M. Wvnier 

LSTC T-549 

Sexuality and the Church 

Though the course will not begrudge answers, it 
will concentrate first on what the questions are. 
Discussion of problematic sexual behaviors with 
movement toward an affirmative position. Tl\e 
ethics of sexuality will loom large but more so a 
theology of sexuality. A major concern will be the 
special role of die church. 
Bertram M 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 

LSTC T-603 

Graduate Theology Seminar: 

Concepts and Methods 

The seminar is one of three that is required for 
graduate students in Christian theology. The 
emphasis will be on mediodology, introducing the 
student to basic concepts and issues that will be 
used in a rigorous fashion to help students clarify 
their own methodological styles. 
Braaten MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

M/LM360 

Issues in Feminist Studies 

An exploration of Feminist theory and theology, 
with an eye toward naming and critiquing sexism 
in our religious institutions and in society at large. 
TBA TBA Winter 



67 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



MSS411 

Beginnings: Creation and Evolution 

This course aims at presenting the minister who is 
responsible for religious education of the young a 
reasonable resolution of the problem without any 
compromise of religious tradition or the findings of 
current empirical investigators. 
Meyer TEA Winter 

NPTSTHEO'lll 

Theology in a Global Perspective 

Through primary readings this course will investi- 
gate the many theologies emerging from every cor- 
ner of the globe. Special attention will be given to 
the following areas: prominent theological themes, 
methodology, sources, portraits of Jesus and contex- 
tualization. 
Pcpe-Levison M 2-5 Winter 

NBTS TH 425H 
Documentos Teologicos 
(Theological Documents) 

Estudio de documentos teologicos claves elaborados 
en las ultimas tres decadas, tanto en circulos protes- 
tantes como catolicos, a nivel del continente amer- 
icano (America Latina, Estados Unidos y Canada). 
Ademas de la interpretacion teologica, se buscaran 
modelos populares para su aplicacion pastoral, 
hacia la realizacion de una mision integral. 
Zapata M . 6-8 :40 p.m . Winter 

SCUPEB-TH302 

Biblical Theology of the City 

Theology in relation to the city is examined in this 
course in the following areas related to student's 
placements: 1) the sociological/anthropological 
dynamics of the internship/parish, 2) implications 
of service in light of prevalent community themes, 
3) pastoral theology towards community whole- 
ness, 4) church organization and congregational 
development, 5) missiological approach to min- 
istry. 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Scott Ta.M. Winter 

S-WTS 05-522S 

Contemporary Theological Classics 

An introductory course offering a careful examina- 
tion of some five highly influential works of con- 
temporary theology. Representative authors consid- 
ered include R. Otto, M. Buber, K. Barth, D. 
Bonhoeffer and others. 
Stevenson WF 9 A 0:50 Winter 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

1. MORAL THEOLOGY 

BTS T460 
Theological Ethics 

Various theological responses to basic themes in 
Christian ethics: nature and the source of the good, 
the chracter of the moral self and the criteria for 
judging action. 
Wagner 1 122-3/ 16 WF 10:4042:20 Winter 



CTU E 370 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

(For course descrption, see Fall.) 
WadeU M 7-9:30 P.M. 



CTU E 375 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
WadeU MW 8:30-9:45 



Winter 



Winter 



G-ETS 22-611 

Ethics of M.L. King, Jr. and 

Reinhold Niebuhr 

Comparison of their ethical systems; analysis of 
their methods and conceptual frameworks, their 
strategies for social change and philosophies of 
non-violence, exploration of the relation of 
"Christian Realism" to the image of God and to the 
concepts of sin, personhood, power, social justice, 
love, eschatology. Kingdom of God and the 
"Beloved Community." 
Young TTK 3:30-5 Winter 

LSTCE.310 
Christian Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Sherman TF 1-2:15 Winter 

MS M420M4 

Readings in Moral Theology 

This course will introduce the student to various 
contemporary authors and their approaches to topi- 
cal problems. Some areas of concern: the existence 
of a Christian ethic, the problem of evil, natural 
law. This course will be helpful to those who plan 
to concentrate in the field of Moral Theology. 
Listecki TBA Winter 

S'WTS 08'504S 
Foundations of the Moral Life 

An introduction to the foundations for a theologi- 
cal ethic. The course will focus on Christian faith 



68 



Ethical Studies 



in relation to the moral life, practical moral reason- 
ing, and the church as a moral community. 
Sedgwick UW 3-4:50 Winter 



XL SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

CTUE422 

Economic Justice and Christian Faith 

In a planetary and post- industrial society it is no 
longer possible to provide an ethic of economic life 
that is not in strict relation to an ethic of political 
life and an ethic of communication. A Christian 
ethic must rest its claims to normativity by the dif- 
ference it makes for these interrelationships. 
Famasari MW 1 1 :30'l 2:45 Winter 

CTUE541 

World Poverty, Development, Liberation 

A theological investigation and assessment of the 
division of the world into rich and poor countries. 
Poverty, development and liberation as socio- 
political phenomena will be studied in the light of 
Scripture and Catholic social teaching. TTieir 
embodiment of today's karios for Christian com- 
munities will provide the focus. 
Fornasari T 1-3:30 Winter 

CTU E 584 

Moral Issues in Economics and Business 

The relationship between Christianity and the ori- 
gins of modern capitalism: a Christian critique of 
capitalism; the corporate responsibility movement; 
international economic issues; ethics in business. 
PawUhowski T 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

GTS TEC 420 

The Beatitudes: A Moral Perspective 

Reflections on the call and challenge of the 
Beatitudes as part of the Christian didache for 
Christians of every era, based on contemporary bib- 
lical scholarship, classical interpretations, and con- 
temporary understandings. 
Eugene Th9-12:40 Winter 

CTS TEC 433 

Contemporary Process Theology and 

Social Ethics 

This seminar will focus on the writings of the peo- 
ple informed by the philosophical theology of A.N. 
Whitehead. Writings will be selected from the 
work of such representative figures as John Cobb, 
David Griffin, Lewis Ford, Charles Hartshorne, 



Bernard Lee, Bernard Meland, Schubet Ogden, 
Norman Pittenger, and Daniel Day Williams. 
Sckroeder Wl-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 531b 

Paul Tillich: Theology and Social Ethics 

Seminar for development and critical discussion of 
papers dealing with some aspect of Tillich's 
thought. The first month is devoted to a conclu- 
sion of Tillich readings. After a reading period 
when students develop their papers, the conclusion 
of term is devoted to oral defense of student's 
papers before seminar members. Prereq: TEC 531a. 
Sckroeder T 2-5 Winter 

MTS E-404 

Contemporary Christian Political Ethics 

This course introduces Christian political ethics 
through reading authors whose approaches to the 
subject matter and positions on central ethical 
questions differ. The course examines the various 
underlying assumptions, methodologies, and posi- 
tions on such questions as the role of the Church 
in politics, and the relation of Christians to the 
State. 
HadseR T 1-3:50 Winter 

MTS E-320 
Liberation Ethics 

This course is an introduction to liberation ethics. 
It examines the political, social and economic con- 
tent of liberation ethics in South America, particu- 
larly Brazil. The second part of the course concen- 
trates several works on liberation theology and 
ethics, with attention to both the methods used 
and the positions taken. 
HadseU F 1-3:50 Winter 

M/L E 423 

James Luther Adams: Theology of 

Voluntary Associations 

An introduction to the thought of James Luther 
Adams on the religious and political meaning of 
voluntary associations for democratic social 
change. In addition to reading in the basic works of 
Adams, students will participate in a critical read- 
ing and discussion of the papers prepared for the 
February 1990 conference at Meadville/Lombard 
on "James Luther Adams and the Democratic 
Prospect." 
Engel TBA Winter 

MS M336M-5 
Social Justice 

The Church's teachings are explored through the 
encyclical tradition beginning with Leo XIII to 



69 



Ethical Studies 



Religion and Society Studies 



John Paul II. Questions concerning the topics of 

society, the family, labor, etc. are treated in this 

course. 

Listecld TBA Winter 

SCUPE S-H 302 
Transforming Urban Systems 

Urban pastors and congregations often must con- 
front the social, economic and political systems 
that affect citizens' quality of life. This course 
examines these systems in individual communities 
and the metropolitan region as a whole and seeks 
to find new ways of transforming them when neces- 
sary. 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Simpson T/iA.M. Winter 

S'WTS 08-612S 

Ethics and Human Sexuality 

This seminar will consider changing understanding 
of the nature of human sexuality through histori- 
cal, contemporary, theological, and ethical studies 
of human sexuality. Of concern will be what is sex- 
ual identity and how it is related to the understand- 
ing of the human person and Christian spirituality. 
As well, the course will focus on issues, documents, 
and resources before the Episcopal Church. Limit: 
15. 
Sedgwick TTK 3 -4 ;50 Winter 

TEDS ST701 

Colloquium: Economic Systems and 

Christian Ethics 

An examination of some current economic theo- 
ries (specifically Marxism, free-enterprise capital- 
ism, and evangelical "simple lifestyle" theory) in 
the light of biblical teachings, and an attempt to 
formulate a new proposal for a Christian economic 
theory that takes account of both the visibile and 
the invisible aspects of God's creation. 1 credit 
hour. 
Grudem TBA Winter 



RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 



BTS 1-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

(For course decription, see Fall.) 

Meyer 1 122-3116 T 230 A -30 Winter 



BTS T-439 

Theology of Urban Church 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Wagner 1/243 T-S, M-F 8-J 1 Winter 

CCPM/CTSA>STC/MTS M-370 
Introducti(Hi to Public Ministry 

What is public ministry? How do public issues get 
raised, defined, resolved? What is the appropriate 
role of the church in this process? What do faith 
communities contribute to social analysis? This 
course will address these and other questions con- 
cerning the role of the church in the world, using 
debates, panels, readings, discussions, films, visits. 
The course is designed as an introduction and pre- 
requisite for more advanced courses in public min- 
istry. Enrollment limited to students of CTS, LSTC 
and MTS. 

FishlHess/MyersfPerol 
Rodr{guezIStockiJueJl W 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CCPM/LSTC RS462 
Community Economic Development 

Orientation to the theory and practice of commu- 
nity economic development, exploring the rela- 
tionship of macro-economic trends with communi- 
ty economic development on a neighborhood level 
and noting ways to expand the notion of develop- 
ment to include an increase in the capacities of cit- 
izens and options for churches and community- 
based organizations. A sequel to CCPM/MTS 
M-444. Fees may apply; see p. 18. 
Kretzmann/Bute et cd. Th 2-5 Winter 

CTU M 438 

Hispanic Faith and Culture 

Religion and culture, faith and life are inseparables 
for Hispanics. How are these values expressed with- 
in the Hispanic community? What are the pastoral 
implications for the minister? This course will offer 
an opportunity to discover how the values inherent 
in Hispanic religion and culture affect ministry. 
Pineda UW 1041:15 Winter 

CTS TEC 483 

Pastoral Spirituality and Social Structures 

Exploration of aspects essential to a spirituality 
which wishes to be liberating on both personal and 
societal levels. A consideration and integration of 
prayer/action, solitude/solidarity, contempla- 
tion/communication as religious responses to issues 
of social justice. A review of paradigms provided by 
Bonhoeffer, King, Merton, Thurman, Day, Tutu, 
etc. 
Eugene T 2-5 Winter 



70 



Religion and Society Studies 



World Mission Studies 



G-ETS 22-505 

Vocati(m and the Nature of Ministry 

in Church and Society 

The historical evolution of vocation from "Calling 
to Career" in the church and society using socio- 
logical and psychological insights into vocation 
and personal identity and contemporary case stud- 
ies. 
Keller 2/5-3/10 W 840:50 &F94 1:50 Winter 

G-ETS 22-623 

Rural Communities and the Small Church 

Analysis of the various kinds of rural communities 

in the midst of social change; ethical issues related 

to agriculture and the appropriate patterns and 

strategies for the Christian community to carry out 

its mission in such settings; field visits and case 

studies. 

ThoUn/Keefer Th 6-8 :50 P.M . Winter 

NPTSMNST-169 
Introduction to Church Planning 

An introductory exploration of the principles and 
practices of church plarming. Topics to be consid- 
ered will be: how cities grow; churches and the 
comprehensive plan; and factors in locational crite- 
ria for churches. 
R.Larson W 2-3:30 Winter 

NPTSMNST-172 

Sociology of Congregational Life 

An analysis will be made of the major factors that 
affect and determine patterns of belief and behav- 
ior within congregations. Students will do field 
study of local churches to test learnings. 
Carbon W 2-5 Wx{\m 

NBTS RS 405H 

Presencia Cristiana en America Latina Hoy 

(Christian Presence in Latin America Today) 

Lectura de la historia contemporanea de la iglesia 
latinoamericana (1960 al presente). An^lisis de 
"los signos de los tiempos" mas significativos, a la 
luz del proceso historico continental, sus 
movimientos sociales y politicos, las corrientes 
teologicas emergentes, el movimiento misionero, y 
la presencia y crecimiento de los catolicismos y 
protestantismos. 
Zapata W 6-8:40 P.M. Winter 

TEDS PT845 
Religion and Law 

The study of the process of legal thinking with 
attention to the theological background of 
American law, the philosophy of law, church-state 
issues and the interaction of law, religion and 



morality. A portion of the course will be devoted to 
an analysis of court decisioris on major first amend- 
ment cases with a view toward gaining both histor- 
ical perspective and facility in understanding cur- 
rent disputes before the courts. 
^pter TBA Winter 



WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 



BTS M77 
Theology of Mission 

An exploration into the contemporary theology 
that engages in socio-political and religio-cultural 
realities of the pluralistic world, and an examina- 
tion of its implications for the life and mission of 
the Christian church. 
MotsMofea \/2'3/(> T I -4:20 Winter 

BTS M-573 

Travel Seminar: Faith Explorations in a 

Cross-Cultural Setting: Nigeria 

Congregational life and the various ministries of 
the Ekklesiyar Yan'uwa A Nigeria (EYN) — the 
Church of the Brethren in Nigeria — will be 
explored. A cooperative seminar with the students 
and faculty of the Theological College of Nigeria 
(TCNN) is envisioned. 
Matsuoki/Faus/Cassel 12/28-1/14 Winter 

CTUW412 

Principles of Liter-Religious Dialogue 

This course examines various prinicples and atti- 
tudes of significance for those who will be actively 
engaged in inter-religious dialogue. It discusses this 
from the vantage point of theology of religions and 
formative spirituality. It addresses the question of 
the cross-cultural migration of symbols, and devel- 
ops the principle of complementarity and the possi- 
bility of convergence. 
Kaserow TTK 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTUW56I 

Trends in Mission Theology 

This is a small, seminary-style course, where some 
important issues in contemporary mission shall be 
'round-tabled.' Methods include lecture-presenta- 
tions, prepared seminars, readings and discussions. 
The topics will be selected by the group in the first 
week- 
Gittins W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 



71 



World Mission Studies 



CTU W 564 

Literacy, Orality, and Evangelizaticm 
Jesus spoke, and ("non- literate") people learned. 
Today evangelization often depends on literacy, a 
medium inferior to orality in many ways. We con- 
sider the power of the spoken word in socialization, 
value-formation, pedagogy and knowledge; and we 
reassess our methods of evangelization accordingly. 
Class by arrangement, individuals/small group. 
Consult instructor in Fall. 
Gittins MWI'2:15 Winter 

CTU W 592 

Lakota Belief, Ritual and Spirituality 

An exploration of some aspects of the belief, ritual 
and spirituality of the traditional religion of the 
Lakota Indians on the Rosebud and Pine Ridge 
Reservations (optional traveling seminar). Special 
attention will be given to the effects of western 
society and missionary approaches on the Lakota 
people, their culture and way of life. 
Barbour T 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 



ing, and independence; ecumenical vs. evangelical 
viewpoints; issues of religious pluralism and inter- 
faith dialogues, human liberation and advocacy of 
justice, cultural identity and inculturation. 
Scherer MW 1-2:15 Winter 

MTSM35 

Traveling Seminar: Christianity 

in the Middle East 

The seminar, designed to locate Middle Eastern 
Christianity — Orthodox, Protestant, Catholic — 
within its historical, dieological, cultural and geo- 
graphical context, consists of: presentations by 
scholars and religious leaders/activists in the 
Middle East on critical issues and movements con- 
fronting the people and the Church in the region; 
travel to Syria, Jordan, Israel/Palestine Egypt and 
Cyprus; visits to significant communities of renewal 
and of social charge; visits to historic sites. Held 
during three weeks in late February — early March 
1990. 
TBA TBA Winter 



CTU W 593 

Lakota-Christian Dialogue (Field Trip 

to South Dakota) 

Specially designed for those preparing for Native 
American ministries and/or interested in Lakota- 
Christian dialogue. This course consists of a week- 
long field intensive on The Rosebud Reservation, 
S.D, led by traditional and Christian Lakota Sioux 
and Christian missionaries. Offered in conjunction 
with W 592. Travel costs to be arranged. 
Barbour TBA Winter 

CTU W 595 

Mission Integration Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
BarbourfKaserow M 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

LSTCW-414 

Confessing Christ in the Cultural Context 

Using the Lutheran World Federation's study pro- 
ject of this name, the course will deal with basic 
theological questions related to indigenization, 
enculturation, and pluralization in the context of 
witness and service. Case studies will compare 
three pairs of countries: Sweden and Tanzania, 
Indonesia and Germany, Japan and the U.S.A. 
hhida TF 2-30'3:45 Winter 



MTS W-437 

Islam, the Muslim World and 

Christian Self'Understanding 

A course which will provide an introduction to 
Islamic belief and practice, an overview of the 
Muslim world and the issues which confront it, and 
an exploration of what these mean for contempo- 
rary Christian theology and praxis, with special ref- 
erence to Christology and missiology. 
Haines 1/1849; 24 -2; 2/22-2^ Winter 

NPTSMNST-151 

Cultural Dimensions in Missions 

Insights from social sciences are applied to the mis- 
sionary task of the church. Advocacy and contexu- 
talization of the gospel in varous cultures are stud- 
ied. 
WeU M7-J0P.M. Winter 

NPTS MNST-153 

The Christian Confrcmtation with the 

World's Religions 

The class will seek understanding of similarities 
and distinctives of the world religions. The empha- 
sis is on dialogue between the Christian and the 
non-Christian as persons. 
WeU TK 2-5 Winter 



LSTCW-511 

The Kingdom of God and the 

Church's Mission 

Introduction to foundational elements of missiolo- 
gy as a specialized discipline. Attention is given to 
classical theories of evangelization, church plant- 



TEDSME675 
Third World Missions 

A study in the development of mission vision in 
the third-world countries and their involvement in 
sending missionaries. 
Moffet TBA Winter 



72 



History of Religions 



Ministry Studies 



HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 



LSTCW-428 
Understanding Islam 

The existence of two million Muslims in the 
U.S.A. and the dramatic emergence of Islam on 
the world scene have awakened increased interest 
in the nature of Islam. This course introduces the 
student to the origins of Islam, the Qur'an and its 
teachings, Muslim worship and practice, and char- 
acteristics of Muslim life in the modem world, as 
well as Christian faith and witness in this light. 
Scherer M 8:30-9:45; W 8:l5'9:30 Winter 

M/LHR439 

Islam: Faith, Tradition and Dialogue 

Understanding Islam as a world faith and tradition 
is of critical importance for ministers and laity. The 
course will examine Islam from the perspective of 
al-Qur'an, the prophet, law and history. Central 
issues of contemporary Islam, liberal and funda- 
mentalist, such as the impact of the Iranian revolu- 
tion and the debate over litereature insulting to the 
faithful will be discussed. Muslim guests will partic- 
ipate in a dialogue. Students may be asked to pre- 
sent worship services or programs on Islam at a 
local Judeo-Christian congregation. 
Lax>an W 7- JO P.M. Winter 

S-WTS 04-5118 

The Self in World Religions 

An introduction from the perspective of the history 
of religions of the development of Hinduism, 
Hinayana Buddhism, and Mahayana Buddhism. An 
exploration of ways in which the Hindu and 
Buddhist religions can legitimately criticize, sup- 
port, and extend Christian theological reflection. 
Stevenson TTK 9-10:50 Winter 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

CCPM/MTS M-377 
Volunteer Ministry 

The goal of this course is to demonstrate how min- 
istry can be enhanced through increasing volunteer 
leadership skills. During the course, each student 
will develop a model volunteer ministry program 
for a particular large, middle-sized, small or special- 



ized ministry situation and describe their own role 
and leadership style in that situation. Fees may 
apply; see p. 18. 
Hargleroad W 7-9:50 P.M. Winter 

GTS CM 310 
Church Administration 

An exploration of the local church as administra- 
tive unit. The course will deal with administrative 
skills, the pastor as administrator, organizational 
techniques, use of volunteers, issues of stewardship, 
evangelism and church growth, denominational 
relationships and resources in administration. 
Church models will be reviewed. 
Smith Th 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 

G-ETS 34-612 
Relational Evangelism 

The study of evangelism as total lifetyle, enabling 
the student to develop styles of evangelism which 
are solid, workable, but also uniquely personal. 
Focus on one-one-one encounter and discipleship 
principles for follow-up. Intensive. 
Tuttle TWThF 940:50 Winter 

&MTWThl:30'4'30 

LSTCM-452 
Senior Seminar III 

Tailored to individual needs as students are about 
to be ordained, this course may include workshops 
on church administration, stewardship, evangelism, 
youth ministry, parish analysis, and planning the 
first years in ministry. 

Conrad/Hess TTh 1142:15 Winter 

Bozeman/TBA M 1142:15 Sprir)g 

W 11:1542:30 

MTSM-345K 

The Pietistic Movement in the Korean Church 

(Taught in Korean) 

The Korean Church has been shaped significantly 
by several Pietistic movements. Students will iden- 
tify and study these movements and their impact 
on the Christian Church. Both strengths and limits 
will be studied and implications of ministry will be 
explored. 
Kang U 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 

GCPM/SCUPE/MTS M-448 
Mobilizing for Public Ministries: 
Theory, Research and Working Models 

Based on recent research, we review working mod- 
els of public ministries mobilized through commu- 
nity analysis and congregational self-understand- 
ing. We examine lay and clergy leadership, volun- 
teer development, transitions from planning to 



73 



Ministry Studies 



action, fund raising, legal issues, justice and service, 

developing partners, ministry interpretation, and 

the use of outside resources. Fees may apply; see pp. 

18-19. 

Dudley T6:30-9;30p.M. Winter 

MS MS 366 
Working With Groups 

This course will attempt to explore the group skills 
necessary for effectively working with groups. It 
will also address group problem solving and deci- 
sion making, as well as how to organize and run 
effective meetings and discussion groups. 
Kicanas TBA Winter 

NPTSMNST-106 

Discipleship: Theology and Practice 

The course aims to provide a comprehensive and 
practical experience in being a disciple, making 
disciples and training disciples. It is intended to 
equip students to do person-context and church- 
context discipling. 
Reed Th 7 -10 P.M. Winter 



S'WTS 13-608 
Women in Ministry 

This course will meet once a week for an extended 
period of time to discuss major issues confronting 
women. Special attention will be given to ques- 
tions of identity and priesthood focusing on the 
experience and consciousness of women. Readings 
from feminist literature will be combined with 
some discussions with women from outside the 
seminary. 
Garvey/Barker W 1-3:50 Winter 

S-WTS 14'604S 

The Dynamics of Ministry: Small Churches 

This course will examine basic elements of parish 
ministry, including the identity and organization of 
the congregation, the influence of social context 
and the task of leadership as these elements inter- 
act with die theology of the church in the arena of 
the local congregation. The small church will be 
used as a point of reference for considering the 
dynamics of parish ministry. 
Koehdine TBA ' Winter 



NETS MN 330 
Church Administration 

This course explores the ways in which a pastor's 
personality type and leadership style enhance or 
inhibit growth and renewal within a congregation. 
It is assumed that each student will be involved in 
a ministry context where strategies for congrega- 
tional life and mission will be developed. 
NehonfNichoh Th 7-9 :40p.m. Winter 

SCUPE M 302 

Evangelization and Urban Congregations 

This one-week intensive course explores the con- 
cerns of the urban church and seeks to discover its 
evangelistic opportunities. Topics included are: 
evangelizing with regard to neighborhood needs, 
exploring the link between personal and corporate 
renewal, planning and preparation for evangeliza- 
tion, gaining access with sensitivity, and making 
apostles as well as disciples. 4 hours. Fees may 
apply; see p. 19. 
Tom 1/2-6 Winter 

S-WTS 14-501S 

Approaches to the Ministry of the Church 

This course is designed to help students refine their 
understanding of ministry in the light of biblical 
and historical precedents and some contemporary 
models. It also introduces students to ministry as 
education, pastoral care, administration, preaching, 
leading worship, and the enabling of lay ministry. 
WinterslRoss TTh 9-10:50 Winter 



11. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTU B 480 
Biblical Spirituality 

(For course description, see Biblical Studies - 

General.) 

Rosenblatt MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

CTU M 410 
Spiritual Direction 

A survey of the history of the development of the 
notion of spiritual direction will focus on the quali- 
ties of the director, the aims of experience, and dif- 
ferent types and forms of the spiritual dialogue. 
Students will engage in role-playing various collo- 
quies and share in evaluating the experiences. 
Moosbrugger TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU T 493 

The Experience of God in Teresa of Avila 

and John of the Cross 

A study of the mysticism of the Spanish 
Carmelities, Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross. 
After an overview of the cultural and spiritual con- 
text and the body of the writings, their respective 
understanding of die nature and stages of mystical 
experience will be analyzed and compared. 
Lozano TTh 1 1 :30-l 2:45 Winter 



74 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 



Pastoral Care 



CTU T 495 

Theology and Prayer in the Christian East 

An examination of Eastern Christian spirituality 
and the ways that it interacts with the fundamental 
doctrines of the Christian faith. Both patristic and 
later Eastern Christian sources will be studied. 
Chtovsky MW 1 1 :3042:45 Winter 

CTU H 496 

Eighteenth and Ninetea\th Century 

Western Spirituality 

An analysis of the currents of spirituality in 
Western Europe from Enlightenment to 
Romanticism, with particular some significant 
personalities in eitheenth century Italy (Liguiro, 
Paul of the Cross), Ireland (McAuley, Rice), 
France (Chateaubriand, Barat, Lacordaire, Eymard, 
Dehon) and the religious families founded by some 
of them. 
Lozano TTK 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU B 529 

Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 

A seminar that examines the mystical substratum 
of Jewish historical and religious experience 
through a study of the messianic movements in 
Judaism from the Talmudic period up to and 
including the Sabbatai Sevi. Pertinent historical 
texts and source material will be examined. 
Perelmuter T J -3:30 Winter 

CTS CM 550 

Satan: Mythology, Psychology, Discernment 

An examination of the mythology of the "Evil 
One" in the light of its psychological and spiritual 
significance. Particular emphasis will be given to 
the task of discernment in liberation spirituality 
and spiritual direction. 
Moore Th942:40 Winter 

MS M356 
Spiritual Direction I 

An understanding of the theory and practice of 
spiritual direction emerges only through a study of 
history, an understanding of movement in spiritual 
life, and a dialog with contemporary psychological 
theology and practice. Limit: 15. 
Cameli TBA Winter 

MS MS336 
Poverty of Spirit 

This pilot course deals with the broad and inclusive 
concept "poverty of spirit." It will do so in dialog 
with Metz's short work, Poverty of Spirit, the under- 
sanding of voluntary poverty by St. Francis of 
Assisi, etc. The conversations will take place 



against the Leruen Lectionary. 
Siwek TBA 



Winter 



NPTS MNST-102 

Spiritual Formation II: Life of Prayer 

Presentations and discussions will provide intro- 
duction to the scope and variety of the prayers and 
practices of the Christian tradition with small 
groups providing further occasion for discussion of 
and experiment with the presentations and time for 
prayers of particular concern to each group. One 
hour. 
Carlson T 8-9:50 Winter 



111* PASTORAL CARE 

BTS M-440 
Human Sexuality 

A seminar limited in size that helps the students 
deal with their own sexuality. The course will 
include making sure of the facts about sexual rela- 
tions, raise ethical issues, and examine the power 
and social issues related to sexual interactions. 
Garrison 1/22-3/i 6 TTK 9:50- J J :30 Winter 

CTU M 404 

Jungian Psychology and Pastoral Practice 

In this course we will examine the major principles 
and themes in Jungian psychology and will explore 
various ways in which Jungian theory can be useful 
in informing pastoral practice. 
McCarthy W 7-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTU M 405 

Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

UdCarthy TTh 1 1 :30- J 2:45 Winter 

CTU M 408 

Loss and Grief in Pastoral Perpsective 

An examination of: 1) finitude as a human prob- 
lem, 2) attachment as a human necessity, and 3) 
grief as the inevitable response to a variety of loss 
experiences throughout life, including: leaving 
home, material loss, divorce, as well as death. Ways 
of helping those who grieve will be explored. 
Anderson TBA Winter 

CTU M 409 

Pastoral Care to Specific Groups 

This course presents each student the opportunity 
to explore through readings, field research and class 
discussions, the particular pastoral care issues in 



75 



Pastoral Care 



ministry to specific populations. Individual learn- 
ing contracts. 

Staff TBA Winter 

Staff TBA Simng 

CTU M 441 

Pastoral Care of Families 

This course will utilize the family life cycle as a 
framework for exploring the family systems per- 
spective and its contribution to pastoral care in the 
parish. Students will examine their own families of 
origin as a resource for learning to think systems. 
(Can be used towards competency.) 
Anderson T l'3-30 Winter 

CTS CM 306 

African/American Perspectives on 

Pastoral Care 

An examination of pastoral care and counseling 
from the African/American viewpoint. Students 
will be expected to read, critically evaluate, and 
share their "stories" about pastoral contacts. 
Polk T 6:30-9:30 P.M. Winter 

CTS CM 441 

Pastoral Care in the Life of the Church 

A seminar. Students and Chicago area pastors will 
meet together to explore issues in pastoral care and 
theology that arise in the church setting. Case 
studies by participants will be used with emphasis 
on theological interpretation. Classes will be held 
at different churches on the Near North Side of 
Chicago. 
Thornton TBA Winter 

CTS CM 442 
Sexuality 

In an atmosphere designed to demythologize sexu- 
ality, the seminar examines different sexual styles, 
behavior, experience, cultural values, and over- 
reaction to sexual stimuli. Resources from theology 
and the behavioral sciences are utilized as each 
member is asked to develop a value stance about 
sexuality for our time and for ministry. 
Moore WIS Winter 

CTS CM 454 

Health, Illness and Healing 

An examination of the complex and often compet- 
ing understandings of health, illness and healing in 
modern culture as these impinge on church com- 
munities as well as on individuals and families suf- 
fering various diseases. Includes consideration of 
historical as well as contemporary conversions 
between religion, medicine and psychology. 
Miller-McLemore WIS Winter 



CTS CM 543 

Readings in Heinz Kohut and Self 'Psychology 

A thorough investigation of the writings of this 
theorist and analyst. Special attention to implica- 
tions of this ideas about formation and fragmenta- 
tion of self for 1) individual health and develop- 
ment; 2) cultural context; 3) church ministry; 4) 
ministry of pastoral care, counseling, psychothera- 
py. Includes evaluation of theory in conversation 
with various critical theological perspectives. 
MiUer-McLemore M 942:40 Winter 

G-ETS 32-501 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Ashbrook TTK 9-10:50 Winter 

G-ETS 32-602 

Gender Issues in Pastoral Care 

Understanding differences in the way men and 
women approach life, understood in terms of the 
psychological experiences of autonomy and related- 
ness using resources of contemporary psychology 
and neurotheology. 
Rector 2/5'3nOW 840:50 &F 941:50 Winter 

G-ETS 32-634 

The Pastor as Counselor: Premarital, 

Marital, and Family Counseling 

Theory and practice of pastoral counseling with 
couples and families. Issues with couples in premar- 
ital, marital, divorce and postmarital situations as 
well as counseling issues with families of nuclear, 
single parent, blended, and/or extended composi- 
tion. Prereq: 32-501. 
Wimberly T 6-8:50 P.M. Winter 

LSTC M-436 

Alcoholism and Drug Abuse 

This course will deal with the dynamics of chemi- 
cal dependency and drug abuse. Consideration will 
be given to etiology, symptomatology, intervention 
and after care. Alcoholism and drug abuse will be 
viewed from the perspective of family disease Field 
trips and workshops will be included. 
MdinlJohmon Th 2:30-5 Winter 

LSTCM-521 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

A course aimed at the preparation of the pastor for 
his or her predominant type of counseling, consid- 
ering theories and practices in present-day con- 
joint and family therapies, pre-marital education, 
divorce, sexuality, and the sociology of marriage. 
Limited to M.Div. Seniors and D.Min. students. 
Siwmon M 8:30-9:45; W 8:15-9:30 Winter 



76 



Pastoral Care 



LSTC M.622B and E 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Stvanson TEA Winter 

MTSM-310 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

This course leads students toward a basic under- 
standing of the meaning and practice of pastoral 
care. Focusing on various historical and contempo- 
rary models and styles of pastoral care, it helps stu- 
dents acquire skills necessary for field education, 
clinical pastoral education, advanced courses with 
experiential components, internships, and pastoral 
ministry itself. 
Ashhy W 7-9:50 PM. Winter 



NPTSMNST.125 

Ministry to Substance Abusers 

Lecture, discussion and guest presentations will 
develop a biblical, theological and psychological 
basis for the ministry of the church to those strug- 
gling with substance abuse. 
Jackson W 740 P.M. Winter 

NPTS MNST-229 

Ministering to the Family and its Needs 

The goals of the course are to explore various 
interpretations of the femily from theological and 
developmental perspectives, to examine one's own 
family and its role in the local church and to devel- 
op a pastoral care plan to a significant family need. 
Au^pmger M 2-5 Winter 



MTS/LSTC M-322H 

Introduccion al Consejo Pastoral en el Contexto 
Hispano (Introduction to Pastoral Care in the 
Hispanic American Context) 

Este curso es una introduccion al ministerio de 
consejeria y cuidado pastoral. Se enfati2ar^ al pastor 
como consejero entre la poblacion Hispana en los 
Estados Unidos y en Latinoam^rica, las necesidades 
especificas entre la poblacion Hispana y las formas 
bdsicas de la consejeria pastoral. 
Schipani ¥1-3:50 Winter 

MTS M-334K 

Pastoral Care in the Korean'American Church 

(Taught in Korean) 

The three generations of the Korean-American 
Church have different needs for care, and the rela- 
tionships of these generations in the Church 
require different knowledge and skills of pastors. 
This course will provide theory and skills for pas- 
toral care in the Church. 
Shim TBA Winter 

MTS M-408 

Scripture's Power to Transform Life 

Is there a connection between the life we live and 
the text we read? The course will attempt to answer 
this question through examination of the ways 
scripture opens a window on our deepest emotions 
and creates moments of healing. Explorations will 
be informed by biblical scholarship on pastoral 
dimensions of Paul's thought as well as the pastoral 
theologian's interest in studying the 'living human 
document.' 
Ashhy/Welbom M 2-4:50 Winter 



NBTS PC 401 
Pastoral Theology 

This course is an exploration of the integration of 
theology with the practice of pastoral care through 
the use of case studies presented by the partici- 
pants. Prereq: PC 301, foundational courses in 
Bible and Theology. 
Justes TTK9:30-J0:50 Winter 

NBTS PC 405H 

Amor y Sexualidad Humana 

(Love and Human Sexuality) 

El curso consiste en un estudio interdisciplinario 
sobre el tema incluyendo perspectivas biblico- 
teologicas, filos6ficas, psicol6gicas y sexologicas 
con un doble enfoque: auto- reflex i6n personal y 
vocacional, y fundamentos para el ministerio. 
Schipcmi Sec . J : TK 6-8 :40 P.M., Winter 

Sec. 2: F 8-9:20 & 10:40-12 

NBTS PC 407 

Pastoral Care in a Pluralistic World 

This is an exploration of diversity within society as 
a factor in the care of people. The limits of one's 
own experience as a base for offering pastoral care 
will be considered. 
Justes W 2:30-5:10 Winter 

SCUPEPC302 

Practicum: Pastoral Care in an Urban Setting 

Pastors have personal needs to be met as well as 
gifts to share. This course explores those needs and 
how they can be managed in ministry. Subject 
areas include: intimacy, sexuality, guilt, sin, and 
marriage. 2 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Ideran ThP.M. Winter 



77 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



IV. LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

BTS M'474 
Music in Worship 

A strudy of hymnody with special emphasis on the 
function of music in the life of die local congrega- 
tion. Historical and contemporary music will be 
surveyed, including not only American "mainline" 
church music, but music from various cultures and 
traditions. Problems of the small and large congre- 
gation will be discussed. 
Faus 1/22-3/16 T 1-4:20 Winter 



CTU T 355 

Sacraments: Theology & Celebration 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Hughes MW 10-11:15 



CTU T 450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Francis TTh 10-11:15 

CTU T 455 

Becoming a Catholic Christian 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Francis T 7-9:30 PM. 



Winter 



Winter 



Winter 



CTU T 551 

The Liturgy of the Hours 

A seminar course which will examine the historical 
development of the Liturgy of the Hours from early 
Christian patterns of prayer through the reforms of 
Vatican 11. Principles for pastoral adaptation of the 
Hours will be the final goal of the course. 
Foley MW 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU 1 574 

Feminist Hermeneutics and Worship 

Exploration through reading, discussion, and ritual 
of how women's changing experience is transform- 
ing their faith and faith expression. 
Hughes/Osiek M 1-3:30 Winter 

CTSCM313 

Worship and Preaching Through 

the Christian Year 

The course will follow the seasons of the church 
calendar — Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, 
Holy Week, Easter, Pentecost — exploring both 
worship and preaching resources. The class will 
consider traditional and contemporary celebra- 
tions, develop and share liturgies, and work with 



the interpretation of texts and seasons for preach- 
ing. 
Edgerton MW 2-3:20 Winter 

G-ETS 31^615 
Christian Public Worship 

The importance of worship in the life and work of 
the minister and the congregation. Increasing com- 
petence in the understanding, theology, plarming, 
and leadership of worship. Limit: 30. 
Cha^ieU MW 5:30-7:20 P.M. Winter 

LSTC M'380 
Worship 

Introduction to liturgical theology and methodolo- 
gy; historical overview of Christian worship; study 
of litiirgical and hymnological materials in the 
Lutheran Church; die arts as worship and as ser- 
vants of the liturgy. The course focuses on pastoral 
and presidential style in leadership, including com- 
munication skills, and on planning for worship. 
Part of the Teaching Parish experience. 
Bangert TTh 8:30-9:45; F I -1 :50 Winter 
RocheUe TTh 8:30-9:45; F I -1 :50 Winter 

MS S392 

Issues in Pastoral Liturgy 

This course will explore disputed contemporary 
liturgical issues from historical, theological and pas- 
toral perspectives. We will examine concelebra- 
tion, inclusive language, general absolution and 
other controversial liturgical concerns with the aim 
of arriving at a method of pastoral liturgy and prin- 
ciples of liturgical practice. 
Fischer TBA Winter 

NPTS MNST-372 
Hymnology 

This historical overview of the great hymnic peri- 
ods of the Christian church provides an analysis of 
selected hymns from theological, musical and poet- 
ical perspectives. It introduces and gives ideas for 
practical usage of The Coverumt Hymnal in the 
local parish setting. Intensive. 
Eckhardt TBA Winter 

S-WTS 09-504S 

The History and Principles of 

Liturgical Worship 

A basic introduction to liturgical studies. The 
meaning of liturgical worship and its place in 
Christian life, its expression in the classical litur- 
gies of the Early Church, Middle Ages, and 
Reformation, and its renewal in the contemporary 
Liturgical Movement with particular emphasis on 
the Eucharist. 
MitcheU TTh 3-4:50 Winter 



78 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



Preaching and Communication 



S-WTS 11-5168 

Introdution to Church Music II 

(For course description, see Fall S-WTS 11-515S. 

Prereq: 11-515S.) 

Howe MlO'll;Thll'll :50 Winter/Sprir)g 

S-WTS 11-620S 
Sight'Singing and Ear-Training 

A basic course of instruction to help students sight- 
sing with confidence and develop aural skills for 
singing. The class combines individual and group 
instruction, and materials for practice include tunes 
from the Hymnal and other such sources. Limit: 8. 
One-half unit. 
Howe TBA Winter 



V. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

CTU M 449 

Communcation Skills for Public Ministry 

(For course description, see Fall.) 



experience. 
Niedenthal 
Sections: 



TBA 



MWll-30'l2:45 



CTU M 450 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembly 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Cannon (A) W 8:3041:00 

TBA (B)T 8:3041:00 



Winter 



Winter 
Winter 



CTU M 552 

Advanced Practicum in Preaching 

This course is designed for those already familiar 
with the basic exegetical and homiletical skills. 
The course will explore homiletical methods, the 
role of imagination in preaching, preaching in rela- 
tion to theology and/or Scripture. Prereq: CTU 400 
level course or equiv. in preaching. Limited enroll- 
ment. 
Cannon T ]-3;30 Winter 

G-ETS 31-501 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

ChatfieU TBA Winter 

LSTC M-340A 
Preaching 

The aim of the course is to help students develop a 
holistic view of preaching which does justice to 
four factors: the preacher, the listener, the message, 
and the churchly context, so as to establish sound 
practice in sermon design and delivery. Lectures, 
readings, discussions, lab sessions. Teaching parish 



TK 8:30-9:45 + sec. Winter 

M 12:30-2:15 

T 8-9:45 

T 10:45-12:30 

W 2:30-4:15 



LSTCM-340B 
Preaching 

An introductory course in witnessing to the bibli- 
cal message dirough preaching. Pericope analysis: 
goal/diagnosis/prognosis analysis; development of 
ideas; examination of styles, occasions, settings, 
content for preaching. Lectures, readings, discus- 
sions, lab sessions, Teaching Parish experience. 
Weyermcnn Thll-l 2: 15 + sec. Winter 

Sections: T 8-9:45 

T 10:45-12:30 

T 1-2:45 

LSTCM-451 
Senior Seminar II 

Offers students in their final year the opportunity 
to review and deepen their understanding of the 
task of preaching. 

Jensen/Krentz MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

NiedenthallPero TTh 1142:15 Sfrring 

LSTCM-454 
Christianity and Tragedy 

This seminar which probes the relationship 
between a tragic sense and vision of life and a 
Christian one, and the bearing of this relationship 
on theological understanding and Christian procla- 
mation. Basic readings are dramatic works of 
tragedy and selected sermons of Paul Tillich. 
Limited enrollment; consent of instructor required. 
Niedenthd T 2:30-5 Winter 

MTS M-433 
Advanced Preaching 

Preaching a sermon is an event which brings 
together a biblical text, the faith experience of the 
congregation, the historical and current realities of 
the culture in which it lives, and the person of the 
preacher. This course will focus on sermon prepara- 
tion, exegeting the culture and congregation as 
well as the text, and developing communication 
skills. Special attention to the variety of preaching 
occasions: Sunday morning, weddings, funerals. 
Buchanan W 1-3:50 Winter 

NPTSMNST-138 
Communcation Theory and Skills 

The study and performance of basic experiences in 
communicating the Christian faith: speech prepa- 



79 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



ration and delivery, oral reading, storytelling and 

interpersonal communication. 

B. Nelson TTh 2-3:30 Winter 

NBTS MN 382 

The Principles of Preaching 

This course is an introduction to the principles and 
practice of preaching. Attention will focus on the 
theology of preaching, hermeneutics, structure and 
the delivery of sermons. 
Chapman W 2:30-5:10 Winter 

S-WTS 11-5018 
Preparing to Preach 

A study of the theology of Christian proclamation 
and of the steps one goes through in die prepara- 
tion of effective sermons, including interpretation 
of the biblical passages appointed for the day, 
development of ideas, sermon, construction, and 
illustration. 
Edwards MW I -2:50 Winter 



VI. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

BTS M-387 
Ministry with Families 

This course is an exploration of the congregation 
in its educational ministry with families. Emphasis 
will be given to the dynamics of family life, parent- 
ing skills, peace and justice issues, evaluation of 
existing resources and programs, and development 
of new approaches for particular family situations. 
Richter 1/22-311 6 TTK 8-9:40 Winter 

CTU M 464 
Sacramental Catechesis 

This course will address the complementarity 
between litrugy and catechesis. Attention will be 
given to defining the needs of the community 
being catechized — adults, youth, children — and 
development of programs and teaching methodolo- 
gy to serve these needs. 
Lucinio M 1-3:30 Winter 

CTU M 564 

Education for Religious Adulthood 

A course designed to enable the participants to 
appropriate resources for adult learning in order to 
engage more effectively in ministry. Participants 
will examine contemporary adult learning theories 
and become acquainted with the literature of adult 
development as it relates to ministry. 
Tebbe W 1-3:30 Winter 



G-ETS 33-501 

Teaching and Learning in the Church 

The development of competence in teaching based 
on theories of learning and instruction within die- 
ological perspective. Basic skill development in 
teaching. Limit: 24. Intensive. 
Vogel 1/8-1/19 Winter 

TWTh F 9- J0:50 & MTWTh 1 :30-4:30 

G-ETS 33-612 

Strategies and Resources for Youth Ministry 

Assessment of approaches to youth ministry in cul- 
turally diverse situations, including issues of coun- 
seling, program development, administration, 
teaching, developing curriculum with youth, and 
the role of youth minister as staff member and lead- 
er in the empowerment of others. Intensive. 
Seymour 1/8-1/ 19 Winter 

TWThF 9-10:50 & MTWTh 1 :30-4:30 

G-ETS 33/34-617 
Group Life in the Church 

An intensive laboratory experience in group life, 
based on group dynamics theory, that leads to 
development of skills in group process and leader- 
ship in the local church. Limit: 15. Pass/Fail grad- 
ing option only. 

Wingeier 2/5-3/10 Winter 

M 1:30-4:30 & 6-8:50 PM. 

G-ETS 33-635 

History and Theories of Christian Education 

An examination of the development of Christian 
religious education as an academic discipline and 
ministry in church and society in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries, with attention to helping 
students formulate their own stance in educational 
ministry. Prereq: two courses in Christain 
Education. 
Seymour 2/5-3/1 TTh 6-8 :50 P.M . Winter 

LSTC M-477 

Feminist Dimensions in Theological Education 

This course seeks to explore how feminist perspec- 
tives should inform the various biblical, historical, 
theological, and pastoral disciplines; to raise the 
central feminist questions and enable students to 
use them in a classroom setting and to equip stu- 
dents with strategies for dealing with feminist issues 
in their local ministry context. 
Bozeman UW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

M/LM311 

Curricula for Religious Growth and Learning 

An exploration of curricula and programs for life 
span religious education, particularly within the 



80 



Educational Ministry 



Polity and Canon Law 



context of Unitarian Universalism, and the reli- 
gious education philosophies that underlie them. 
Currently available UUA materials will be 
reviewed and evaluted. Attention will be given to 
the writings of Sophia Fahs, Gabriel Moran, Maria 
Harris, and Henry Nelson Wieman as they relate to 
choosing curricula and developing programs. 
Gooding TBA Winter 

NPTSMNSTa34 
Relational Youth Ministry 

The theological and psychological foundations of 
relational ministry with youth, needs of adoles- 
cents, issues in building relationships and specific 
programming ideas for local parish and para-church 
organizations are examined in this study. 
Downs Th 2-5 Winter 

NPTS MNST-238 
Pastor as Educator 

The pastor is called to equip God's people for the 
work of the ministry, to build up the body of Christ. 
Leader development and confirmation will be the 
foci of this course. 
F.Anderson MWTh9 '.1540:25 Winter 

NBTSED310 

Personal Growth Through Group Encounter 

In this course participants share in a laboratory 
group with a commitment to risk new personal and 
inter-personal behaviors. Human relations skills are 
developed by leadership of small groups. Historic 
and current utilization of the small group format by 
the Church for personal spiritual growth is exam- 
ined. 
Jenkins Th 7-9 :40 P.M . Winter 



NETS ED 414 
Teaching Preschoolers 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
MoTTis/TBA TBA 



NBTS ED 415 

Research on the Young Child 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Moms/TBA TBA 



Winter 



Winter 



TEDS CE570 

Church Ministry to Children 

The mental, physical, emotional and social aspects 

of the spiritual growth and needs of the child and a 



study of the church's program in relation to chil- 
dren, including materials and methods for chil- 
dren's work and a unit on the evangelism of chil- 
dren. 
Cannell TBA Winter 

TEDS CE845 

Social Ecology of the Family 

Survey of the sociology of family with a view 
toward theological reflection and practical ministry 
in church, social and political contexts. 
Sell TBA Winter 



VIL POLITY AND 
CANON LAW 

CTS CH 390 

United Methodist Polity 

Focused on the current United Methodist Book of 
Discipline, and its historical and theological back- 
ground, this course will help students gain a func- 
tional knowledge of the United Methodist Church, 
its institutional structures, and its forms of authori- 
ty and power. 
Kuntze Th 6:30'9:30 P.M. Winter 

MTS M-307 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship 
in the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. 
Students are prepared for thinking and acting effec- 
tively in the various church structures diey enter. 
Special attention is given to the relation between 
polity, politics, leadership, and church life. 
Presbyterian students will receive specific assis- 
tance in relation to Standard Ordination 
Examinations in polity and worship. 
Recommended for Middlers. 
Worky and guests ¥941:50 Winter 

S-WTS 14'505S 

Canon Law 

A two-fold introduction to 1) the history of 

Christian canonical legislation with particular 

emphasis on the canonical structures of the 

Episcopal Church; and to 2) the use of canon law 

in pastoral ministry. One-half unit. 

Amadio TBA Winter 




81 



Biblical Studies 

SPRING 1990 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

BTS B-433 

Feminism and Biblical Thought 

The activity and place of women in biblical 
narrative will be examined with particular atten- 
tion paid to the socio-religous place, status, and 
function of women in believing connmunities, then 
and now. 
Meyer T6;30-9;]5 P.M. S/>ring 

CTU B 490 

Biblical Foundations for Mission 

The attitude of the biblical communities to the 
non-biblical world will be investigated for directon 
in the global mission of the contemporary church. 
Material from both of the Testaments will be stud- 
ied. 
Bergant/Bowe TTK 1041:15 Spring 

MTS B'320 

Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls 

The primary focus of this course is the commimity 
which lived at Qumran between 2(X) B.C.E. and 6 
B.C.E. We will examine both the archaeological and 
literary evidence in order to better understand the 
community's origins, history, life, institutions, 
interpretation of scripture and law, and its relation- 
ship to early Christianity. 
Tanzer W 2-4:50 Spring 



Old Testament 

exilio. Enfasis en la exegesis de textos selec- 

cionades. 

Fuerst MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

MTSB-406 

From David to Daniel: 

History, Literature, Theological Ferment 

A study of the Israelite and Jewish literature from II 
Samuel to I Maccabees, giving in-depth attention 
to representatives of each canonical division and 
literary category. Prereq: TTie course presupposes 
familiarity with critical method as acquired in MTS 
B-300 or its equivalent. 
Bolmg M 2-4:50 Spring 

NPTS BlBL-120 
Old Testament Faith I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Pope-Levison M 7-10 P.M. Spring 

S-WTS01-502GS/G.ETS 11-502 
Old Testament Interpretaticm II: 
Latter Prophets and Writings 

Introduction to the critical, historical, and theolog- 
ical study of the Hebrew Scriptures, with emphasis 
on the development of interpretative skills in the 
Latter Prophets (Isaiah-Malachi) and the Writings 
(Psalms-Chronicles); additional study in intertesta- 
mental writings (Apocrypha, Dead Sea Scrolls, 
Josephus, Philo). 
Garvey WF 9-10:50 Spring 



IL CANONICAL CORPUS 



OLD TESTAMENT 

1. INTRODUCTORY 

LSTCB-313 
Israel's Prophets 

Studies in the literature of the prophetic tradition, 
including detailed exegesis of selected passages. 
Knowledge of Hebrew presupposed. 
Fuerst M 9-9:50; W 8:45-9:35 Spring 

Sec: F 9-9:50 or W 1-1:50 
Michel MF 9-9:50; W 8.-45-9:35 Spring 

Sec: W 2:20-3:10 or F 9-9:50 

LSTCB-313H 

Los Profetas de Israel 

(Israel's Prophets) 

Estudios sobre el movimiento profetico, y la liter- 
atura profetica, desde Elias hasta los profetas del 



CTU B 400 
Pentateuch 

A study of the literary origins and development of 
the traditions and themes of the Pentateuch in 
light of their importance for ancient Israel's theolo- 
gy. Attention will be given to questions of interpre- 
tation. 
Bergant MW 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU B 410 

Early (Pre-exilic) Prophecy 

Classical pre-exilic prophecy as it developed from 
Israel's origins and the prophetical guilds to chal- 
lenge and purify religion and lead into the future. 
With close attention to the text we analyze literary 
forms and religioiis motifs. 
Hoppe T 7-9:40 Spring 



82 



Old Testament 



CTUB417 

From Daniel to Qumran 

A survey of non-canonical Jewish literature pro- 
duced from 200 B.C. to A.D. 200. Emphasis on the 
impact these writings had on the theology of early 
Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. 
Hoppe TTK 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU B 420 
Psalms 

Select psalms are studied from each literary or litur- 
gical category for their language, form and theolo- 
gy. Their lasting worth to Israel and the New 
Testament is explored. Helpful for students of litur- 
gy and spirituality or for a review of Israel's reli- 



gion. 
StuhhnueUer 



TTh 11:3042:45 



Spring 



LSTCB-513 

The Psalms in Israel's Worship 

Survey of the major genres of the Psalter and their 
role in Israel's worship. Closer study of individual 
psalms and their major theological themes. Use of 
the Psalter in worship today. 
Marshall MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

MTSB-415 
Jeremiah 

An exegetical and theological inquiry into the 
book of the Judean agoniiing prophet of Jerusalem, 
626-582 B.C. Knowledge of Hebrew will be usefril 
but is not required. 
Campbell M 6:30-9:30 P.M. Spring 

MS B339 
Jeremiah 

A study of both the Book of Jeremiah and the 
prophet himself. The course will include the histor- 
ical background from the time of King Josiah to the 
Babylonian Captivity. 
Schoenstene TBA Spring 

NBTS OT 452 

Studies in the Pentateuch 

A study of the origin, growth, and formation of the 
ftve books of Moses. Students will make an exegeti- 
cal and theological study of the book of Exodus in 
the context of oppression. 
Marioaini TTh9:30'lO:50 Spring 



111. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

CTS CH 308 

Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought 

A sxjrvey of the key issues of the nineteenth centu- 



ry which dominate the present as seen through 
Jewish history and the position of contemporary 
Jewish thinkers. 
Schaalman TK 9-12:40 Spring 

CTS CH 302 

People & Faith of Israel II 

Research in biblical hermeneutics. The fundamen- 
tal problem of communication between Bible and 
present generation. Are there warrants that we 
exegete rather than eisegete? The authority, the 
relevance of the biblical text. The Bible as God's 
word exclusively, uniquely, paradigmatically? Is 
God speaking today? In conformity or dissimilarity 
with the Bible? 
LcCocque T 2'5 Spring 

CTS CH 505/CM 544 

The Meaning of Suffering: 

The Book of Job and Contemporary Psychology 

The book of Job serves as source and reference in 
this cross disciplinary approach to the problem of 
human suffering and its psychological/religious 
meaning. We will come to a fuller understanding of 
ourselves using Job as the primary objective point 
of reference. 
LcCocquefMiUer-McLemore W 2-5 Spring 

LSTC B-640 

Graduate Biblical Seminar 111: The Writings 

An ongoing seminar on materials from the third 
section of the canon: The Writings. Theme for 
1990: Historical and Theological Issues in the 
Books of Chronicles. (For post-M.Div. students. 
Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Klein M J 2:304 Spring 

MSB383 
Dead Sea Scrolls 

A study of the major scrolls found at Khirbet 
Qumran, with their ramifications for understanding 
the religious thoughts of Judaism around the time 
of Christ. 
Schoenstene TBA Spring 

NBTS OT 303 

Old Testament Theology 

This course concentrates on the ideas of the vari- 
ous sections of the Old Testament as expressions of 
Israelite religion and as precursors to Christianity. 
Major trends in modem study are consulted and 
weighed. Prereq: OT 401 and OT 302. 
Marioaini T 7-9:40 P.M. Spring 

S-WTS0I-605S 
Post-Exilic Prophecy 

Among the more momentous chapters of the 



83 



Old Testament 



New Testament 



Israelite story, the exile stands as a pivotal event. It 
was a period that called for careful evaluation and 
judicious planning. In its aftermath, during return 
and restoration, new voices were heard: voices that 
called, cajoled, impelled the people to strive toward 
renewed goals in faith and practice. With Joel, 
Obadiah, Haigai, Zechariah, and Malachi as princ- 
pal guides, we shall explore this new territory. 
Garvey TTK 9-i0;50 Sprir)g 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

BTSB-310 

Introduction to Biblical Languages 

This course seeks to provide the student with an 
introductory knowledge of both Hebrew and 
Greek. The students will have opportunity to do 
word study in both testaments and learn to use the 
necessary tools. 
Roop WF 8-9:20 Spring 

CTU B 326 

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew 11 

This is the second part of a two-quarter course 
which studies the grammar and vocabulary of bibli- 
cal Hebrew in order to prepare students to work 
with the Hebrew text. 
Hoppe MWI'2:15 Sprir\g 

G-ETS 11-642 

Elementary Hebrew 11 

Introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew 

(grammar and syntax) and translation of selected 

prose texts in the Hebrew Bible. Two unit course, 

credit for 11-641 upon satisfactory completion of 

11-642. 

Nash MTThF 1242:50 Spring 

NPTS BlBL-104 
Intermediate Hebrew 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-102.) 



Koptak 



TEA 



Spring 



NBTS BL 303H 

Hebreo 111 (Hebrew 111) 

Este curso es el tercer trimestre de una secuencia de 

tres trimestres con enfasis en el desarroUo de mayor 

habilidad en la lectura del hebreo biblico. Se dara 

especial atencion a trabajo adicional en la sintaxis 

hebrea. 

Homing MThJ-2:20 Spring 



TEDS OT741 

Old Testament Texual Criticism 

Introduction to the methodology of lower criticism 
and comparison of the Massoretic Text of problem 
passages with the Septuagint and other ancient 



Magary 



TBA 



Spring 



NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B-330 

Introduction to the New Testament 

An introduction to the writings of the New 
Testament, focusing on die origin of these writings 
in the life of the early church, the form and con- 
tent of the literature itself, and various methods of 
inquiry used to study and interpret the New 
Testament. 
Gardner WF 10:4042 Spring 

G'ETS 12-501 

New Testament Interpretation: Gospels 

(For description, see Winter.) 



Roth 



MW 5:30-7:20 P.M. 



Spring 



LSTC B-332 
Pauline Tradition 

A study of the composition and content of the gen- 
uine Pauline epistles as well as the deuteropauline 
writings, placing them within their historical set- 
ting. Basic theological and ethical themes of Paul 
will be investigated. 
Henrich TTK 8:30-9:45 Spring 

R8-8:50orlJ-il:50disc.sec. 
Krentz Th 8:30-9:45 Spring 

F8-8:50orJi-iJ:50disc.sec. 

NPTS BlBL-260 

New Testament Theology 

Specific theological subjects are investigaged in the 
teaching of Jesus and in the major New Testament 
writers. Attention will also be given to the 
approaches of modem New Testament theologians. 
Scholer MWThiF) 8-9:10 Spring 

NBTS NT 302 
Paul and His Letters 

This course is a general introduction to the life, let- 
ters and theology of Paul in their first century con- 
texts (Judaism, Graeco-Roman society and early 
Church). Attention is given as well to the history 
of Pauline interpretation and to the issues of 



84 



New Testament 



methodology in the interpretation and use of 

Pauline texts today. 

Cosgrove TTh I '2:20 Spring 

S-WTS 02-501GS 

New Testament Interpretation 1: Gospels 

Designed for the student with no previous work in 
Bible. Focused on the principles of exegesis with 
examination of selected passages in the light of tex- 
tual, literary, form criticism, and redaction criti- 
cism. Attention will be given to first century 
Judaism and basic information about major New 
Testament books. 
Pervo TTh 940:50 Spring 

TEDSNT731 

Backgrounds of Early Christianity 

Introduction to primary sources and recent literary 
finds in Judaism, the Hellenistic religions, and the 
social history of the early Roman empire; provides 
as a background for the study of the ministry of 
Jesus and the life and mission of the early church. 
LiefeU TBA Spring 



11. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTSB-531 
Romans 

A study of Paul's letter to the early church at 
Rome, focusing on the exegesis of Pauline texts, 
major theological and ethical themes that Paul 
develops in Romans, and the significance of the 
letter as a resource for faith and ministry. 
Gardner W 6:30-9:15 PM . Spring 

CTU B 430 

The Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the context, structure and major motifs 
of the Gospel of Matthew. Particular attention will 
be given to the evangelist's role as an interpreter of 
tradition and history for a community in transition. 
Rosenblatt MW 1-2:15 Spring 



CTU B 440 
Gospel of John 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Rosenbhtt W 7-9:30 P.M. 

CTU B 452 

Pauline Theology and Worship 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Bowe MW 11:30-12:45 



Spring 



Spring 



CTU B 460 

Acts of the Apostles 

A study of the content, context, structure, and 
major theological themes of Acts as it describes the 
spread of the gospel from Jerusalem to "the ends of 
the earth." 
Reid MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU B 533 
Parables 

A study of the gospel parables as stories that amaze 
and challenge, inviting the hearer to participate in 
Jesus' understanding of life in relation to God. 
Topics include the nature of parable, guides for 
interpreting New Testament parables, teaching and 
preaching parabolical ly. 
Reid MW 1-3:30 Spring 

CTS CH 530 

Seminar on Acts of the Apostles 

Focus on the literary and historical problems pre- 
sented to the interpreter by the Acts of the 
Apostles, including the literary genre and structure 
of Acts, its relationship to the Gospel of Luke, the 
author's use of sources and the relationship of Acts 
to the Pauline letters. 
Aune W 6:30-9:30 P.M. Spring 

G'ETS 12-621 

The Catholic Epistles: 1 Peter 

A course in the Catholic epistles, focusing on I 
Peter, James and the Johannine epistles. TTiis 
exegetical course will cover the major motifs of 
each work as well as the social background from 
which it emerged. Prereq: 12-502. 
Stegner WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCB-481H 

El Evangelio de San Juan (The Gospel of John) 

Un curso introductorio sobre los temas principales 
tratados en el evangelio, el trasfondo historico de la 
comunidad a quien va dirigido, y aplicaciones de 
estos temas al ministerio contemporaneo. 
Pietrantordo MW 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTC B-543 

Seminar on the Gospel of John 

Research in the Gospel of John, especially on the 

theme of the Messiah. 

Pietrantoruo Th 2:30-5 Spring 

LSTC B-670 

Graduate Biblical Seminar VI: 

Early Christian Literature 

An ongoing seminar on early Christian literature 
other than the Gospels and the Pauline materials. 




85 



New Testament 



Theme for 1990: The book of Revelation, a study 

of the literary, rhetorical, and social features of the 

last book of the Bible. Students will also investigate 

the historical background of this work. (For post- 

M.Div. students. Admission to others by consent of 

instructor.) 

Rhoads T 1:30-5 Spring 

MTS B-401 

The Gospel of John 

An exegesis course which gives attention to the 
content of the Gospel as well as 1 John, the reli- 
gious environment and the community of the 
Gospel, its affinities with Hellenistic and Jewish 
traditions, its place in the developing thought of 
the early church and the significance of its symbol- 
ic language for Christian faith then and now. 
Tanzer TTh lO-ll :50 Spring 



CTS CH 322 

The Theologies of the New Testament 

A study of the various theologies of the New 
Testament. These ethical styles will be compared 
with those found in the contemporary culture. A 
special emphasis will be placed on the function of 
narrative ethics. Prereq: CH 321 or equiv. 
Snyder 79-12:40 Spring 

LSTC/CTU B.542 

Social Study of the New Testament 

Study of the data and perspectives engendered by 

this recent approach, introduction to d\e ways in 

which sociology and cultural anthropology are \ised 

in it, and assessment of the helpfulness of the 

method to contemporary interpretation of die New 

Testament. 

Oskk/Rhoads W 2:30-5 Spring 



NPTSBIBL^TO 

First and Second Thessalonians 

Exegetical study focusing on how Paul tackles such 
problems as character slander, misunderstandings 
regarding the return of Christ, idleness and forg- 
eries. Analysis including Paul's view of Christian 
suffering, human sexuality, work, events surround- 
ing the return of Christ, the Antichrist, divine 
sovereignty and human responsibility, and local 
church leadership. 
Belleville M 2-5 Spring 

NBTS NT 404H 

El Evangelic de Juan (The Gospel of John) 

Este curso examina el texto del evangelic para elu- 
cidar el contexto literario, teol6gico e historico del 
cual surgio el mismo. Se intenta entender tanto el 
texto que se nos presenta como a los cristianos que 
nos lo dieron. 
Weiss TK 6-8 :40 p.m. Spring 



Ill» SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B 592 

The Eucharist in the New Testament 

An investigation of the Eucharist's origins and 
development in the New Testament period. The 
seminar will focus on historical questions as well as 
on the literary and pastoral presentation of the 
Eucharist in the various New Testament writings. It 
will also address the way our findings challenge the 
Church of today with regard to both inculturation 
and social justice. 
LaVerdiere Th 1-3:30 Spring 



NPTS BlBL-262 
Pauline Soteriology 

Examination of Paul's teachings regarding humani- 
ty. Mosaic law, work of Christ, redemption in 
Christ and the Christian life. Analysis including 
the nature of Christian freedom, the place of "law" 
in the life of the believer, free will, Adam's sin, jus- 
tification, redemption, and the pattern of social 
ethics in Paul. 
Belleville Th 2-5 Spring 

NBTSNT450H 

El Nuevo Testament©: Una Lectura 
Tercermundista (New Testament: A Third 
World Reading) 

Este curso dara a los estudiantes una comprension 
basica de la composicion, contenido y mensaje del 
Nuevo Testamento desde una perspectiva tercer- 
mundista. Incluira consideraciones metodologicas y 
la historia de la interpretacion biblica con referen- 
cia especial al problema hermen6utico en "hacer 
teologia desde el reverso de la historia." 
Prerequisitos: Dos cursos del Nuevo Testamento o 
permiso del profesor. 
Weiss F 8-9:20; 10:40-12 Spring 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

MTSB-324/325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek, 1, 11 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Mitchell Sec. I : MTWTh 9-9:50 Spring 

Hilgert Sec. 2: TF 2-3:50 Spring 



86 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



MTS B025K 

Introduction to N.T. Greek 11 

(Taught in Korean) 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

C.Park Ml-30'3:30 



G'ETS 13-502 

History of Christianity 11 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Stem WF 940:50 



Sprir\g 



Spring 



NPTSBlBL-114 

New Testament Greek Readings 

(For course description, see Fall BIBL-112.) 

Snodgrass TBA Spring 

S'WTS 02-665S 
Colossians (Greek Text) 

Study of a Deutero-Pauline epistle to develop 
vocabulary and other linguistic skills for those with 
two or more quarters of New Testament Greek. 
Pervo WF 940:50 Spring 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H-347 

History of Christianity 11 

An overview of the development of the Christian 
churches in the modern period. Topics include 
Protestant scholasticism and pietism, the evangeli- 
cal revival, revolution and romanticism, the age of 
progress, the Roman Catholic reaction. Eastern 
Orthodoxy in the modem period, the ecumenical 
movement, and the churches and totalitarianism. 
Wagner TTh9:3040:50 Spring 

CTU H 301 
Patristics 

An introduction to die great personalities of the 
early Church, their writings and major theological 
contributions, with heavy emphasis on discovering 
their continuing significance for today's Church. 
While H 3(X) Early Christianity surveys this period 
according to major themes, H 301 Patristics 
approaches the same period in a more strictly 
chronological fashion, author by author. 
Chirovsky MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

CTS CH 345 

History of Christian Thought 11 

From the Reformation through the nineteenth 
century. A survey of significant theological move- 
ments, with attention to their social context. The 
theme of redemption will provide focus. (This 
course may be elected independently of History of 
Christian Tought 1). 
Bass MW 11:2042:40 Spring 



G-ETS 13-503 

History of Christianity 111 

Key events, people, and concepts in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries with attention to theologi- 
cal, ethical and institutional formulations and 
power structures, as well as to contributions of the 
Black church, women, and Third World Christians. 
(Discussion section required.) 
Murphy MTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

LSTC H-330 

Reformaticxi and Modem Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and Modern 
Church History outside America, designed to show 
in broad perspective the movements which have 
shaped world Christianity in our time. Lectures and 
discussion of selected source readings. 
Hendel TTh 1142:15 Spring 

LSTCH.331 

Reformation, Orthodoxy, Pietism 

A survey of European church history from 1500 to 
1750, permitting more thorough study of the 
Reformation in its multiple expressions than in the 
course H-330. The age of Orthodoxy and conti- 
nental Pietism, will also receive careful attention. 
Rarem M 1141:50;W 11:1542:05 Spring 
F 14:50 disc. sec. 

MTS H-300 

Transformations of Christianity: 

A Foundational Course 

This fundamental course surveys the history of 
Christianity by exploring the formation and devel- 
opment of its major epochs: early; medieval and 
Reformation; modem. Theological paradigms and 
renewal movements will be placed in historical 
context. A narrative text, primary documents, and 
critical essays will constitute the reading. 
Daniels TTh 10-11:50 Spring 

NPTSHlST-111 

Christian Heritage 11: The Modem Church 

A basic introduction to the history of the Christian 
church is continued in this study from the 
Reformation to the present. Special attention will 
focus on the institutional and theological diversity 
of the modern church in its cultural settings. 
Graham MWTh(F) 8-9:10 Spring 



87 



Historical Studies 



NETS CH 302 

Reformation and Modem Christianity 

This course is an examination of major issues and 
developments in Christian life and thought from 
the time of the Reformation to the present. 
Student research, analysis and evaluation of select- 
ed topics constitute a vital part of the course. 
Permission of the instructor required. 
Ohlmann TTK9:30-]0;50 Spring 

S'WTS 03-503S 

General Church History 111: The Continental 

Reformation and Missionary Outreach 

(1500^648) 

A survey of the life and thought of the Christian 
church during the sixteenth-century reformation 
and counter-reformation with attention to the 
extension of Cbjristianity to the Americas and to 
the distinctive forms of doctrine and practice 
which emerged in Lutheran, Reformed, 
Anabaptist, and Roman Catholic traditions. 

MW 1-2:50 Spring 



IL HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

CTUH312 

From Baroque Catholics to Vatican 11 

A study is made of the miajor trends in the Catholic 
Church from its post-Tridentine phase to the 
movements operative in Vatican II, i.e., from 
Jansenism, through Ultramontanism and 
Modernism, to the Church's confrontations with 
twentieth century political and intellectual trends. 
Nemer MW 1 1 :30- J 2 :45 Spring 

CTU H 426 

Church Growth in Asia and the South Pacific 

A study will be made of the growth of the Roman 
Catholic Church in Asia and the South Pacific, 
observing and commenting on its development in 
the individual countries in that area, from the 
beginning of the nineteenth century until the out- 
break of World War II. 
Nermr W 7-9:30 Spring 

CTS CH 367 

History and Polity of the United 

Church of Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology and prac- 
tices of the United Church of Christ, including its 
antecedents: the Congregational Christian 
Churches and the Evangelical and Reformed 
church. This course earns one credit and satisfies 
current UCC requirements for ordination. 
Smith et al. Th 6:30-9:30 P.M. Spring 



G-ETS 40-673 

United Methodist Studies 111; 

Twentieth Century 

A study of theological and ethical developments in 
Methodist churches as they participated in the 
growing ecumenical movement and in the matur- 
ing economic and political power of the nation. A 
study of the evaluation of the polity of the United 
Methodist Church with its uniquely cormectional 
character in an increasingly pluralistic society. 
KeUerfTroxeU Th I :i04:20 Spring 

M/LH432 

Seminar: The Radical Reformation 

A study of the Anabaptist, Spiritualist, and 
Evangelical Rationalist (antitrinitarian) move- 
ments of the sixteenth century. Each student will 
prepare and present a paper on the theological 
influence of a leader or of a major issue in the 
Radical Reformation. 
Godbey TBA Spring 

NPTS HlST-300, Section 1 
Covenant History and Theol<^ 

The course is designed to help the student 
understand and interpret the evangelical and 
pietistic tradition within which the Evangelical 
Covenant Church stands. Attention is given to the 
Reformation, to expressions of pietism and to its 
historic and theological development in Sweden 
and North America in the nineteenth and twenti- 
eth centuries. Four hours. 
R Anderson MWTh (F) 1 1 ASA 2:55 Spring 



III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

NPTS HSTX-I35J THEO-135 
Theology of Luther 

This seminar examines through reading, research 
and discussion the selected treatises of Luther with 
particular reference to major doctrinal themes of 
the Reformation set in their historical context. 
P. Anderson W 2-5 Spring 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

CTU H 419 

A Decade of History of Hispanics 
in the U.S.A. Church 

Hispanic Catholics have voiced their desire for 
more opportunities to share their historical, cultur- 
al and religious gifts with the Church. Seeking 
active participation, they have raised their voices 



Historical Studies 



since 1972 in significant Hispanic gatherings. 
Discover the significance of the Encuentros 
Nacionales and its method of theological reflec- 
tion. 
Pineda MW 1041:15 Spring 

LSTCH-350B 

American Lutheran Church History 

A course focusing on Lutheranism in the United 
States especially on the problem of unity and polar- 
ization among the various Lutheran traditions. The 
historical development is viewed against the broad 
background of Christianity in America. 
Jiirisson MW 1-2:15 Spring 

MTS/CTS H-409 

Seminar: The Reformed Tradition in America 

Major theological and social issues in the history of 
the Presbyterian, Congregational, and Reformed 
Churches, from the colonial period to the present, 
with particular attention to the internal diversity 
and social contributions of these churches. 
Daniels/Bass M 2-5 Spring 

MS S349/H365 

Theology and the Public Realm in Twentieth 

Century America 

This course will explore the ways in which religious 
symbols and doctrines have been used to interpret, 
critique, and challenge the public order in twenti- 
eth century American life. Discussions will include 
Walter Rauschenbusch and the Social Gospel, offi- 
cial statements of the American Catholic bishops, 
John Ryan, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Martin Luther 
King, Jr. 
Lefebure/ZieUnski TBA Spring 



LSTCH.514 

Seven Ecumenical Councils 

An overview of the trinitarian and Christological 
controversies and decisions of the seven ecumeni- 
cal councils. Each student will present and write on 
one particular aspect or period. With participation 
of the Saint Sava Orthodox School of Theology 
(Serbian Orthodox). 
Rarem T 2:30-5 Spring 

MSH408 

Readings in Ecumenical Theology 

This course is designed to introduce the student to 
the history of the ecumenical movement and the 
present state of ecumenical dialogue as a means of 
understanding the call to Christian Unity as an 
integral part of the mission of the Church. 
Cunningham TBA Spring 

MSH418 

Readings in Late Medieval History 

Stagecraft, emerging ethnic consciousness, alchemy 
and the mastering of nature, natural law, papal 
power, the Inquisition, ministry in a hopelessly cor- 
rupt society, the Reformation. After reading a 
selection of these documents, we shall discuss them 
with a view to applying them to current problems 
in theology and ministry. 
Meyer TBA Spring 

NETS CH 542 

Historical Resources for Ministry 

This seminar is on the relevance, value and use of 
historical resources in the practice of ministry. The 
goal is to develop greater aptitude at interpreting 
the Christian heritage and at utilizing its treasures 
in Christian ministry. Prereq: CH 302 or CH 303. 
Ohlmann WF 10:40-12 Spring 



V. SELECT TOPICS IN 
CHURCH HISTORY 

G-ETS 13/22-621 

Church, Family, and Gender Roles 

in Christianity 

Outline of the shifting relations between church 
and family and gender roles of women and men in 
Western Christianity from the New Testament 
period to the present. Formulation of a historical 
perspective; theological and ethical reflection on 
the relationship between feminism, faith, and fami- 
ly today. 
KelkrIRuether 7 6-8:50 P.M. Spring 



SCUPE S-H 303 

Dynamics and Development of the 

Modem Industrial City 

This one-week course focuses on the following 
issues related to the city: structures of authority; 
financial systems; rules and policies; tools and tech- 
niques in development; theological and ethical 
questions, including those with regard to methods 
of research in urban studies. 4 hours. Fees may 
apply; see p. 19. 
Hcdlett 3126-30 Spring 



89 



Theological Studies 

THEOLOGICAL 
STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

BTST-351 
Contemporary Theology 

Basic doctrines, theological language and perspec- 
tives will be examined in the context of contempo- 
rary issues, theologians, and movements. Student 
essays will respond to representative lectures, read- 
ings, and discussions in relating contemporary the- 
ology to personal faith and the life and mission of 
the church. 
Brown TTh 8-9:20 Spring 

CTS CH 345 

History of Christian Thought 11 

(For course description, see Historical Studies I.) 
Bass MW 11:2042:40 Sprir^g 

G-ETS 21-502 
Systematic Theology 11 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Young WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCT-313 
Christian Theology 111 

For description of the Christian Theology 
sequence, see Christian Theology I. The third 
course in the sequence deals with the Holy Spirit, 
the Church, the means of grace, the Christian life, 
and eschatology. 

Bertram U 1142:15; W 11:1542:30 Spring 

Hefner M 1142:15; W 11:1542:30 Spring 

F 1 141:50 disc. sec. 

NBTS1N311 

Evangelism, Salvation and Social Justice 

This course is intended for first year students as an 
introduction to theological education and its basic 
concerns. We will examine contemporary issues 
about the inter-relationships of evangelism and 
social justice as a means of exploring the interac- 
tion of biblical studies, history and theology to 
inform the shape of Christian life and ministry in 
the church and the world. 
Dayton M 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

NBTS TH 303 
Christian Theology 111 

The conclusion of the three-quarter sequence 
begun in TH 301 and continued in TH 302. This 
course will cover the doctrines of the human per- 



son as creature and sinner, the Holy Spirit, the 

Christian community, and the last things. 

J. Jones M 7-9:40 p.m. Spring 

NBTSTH303H 

Teologia Cristiana 111: Lecturas Contemporaneas 

(Christian Theology 111: Contemporary Readings) 

Este curso es de tipo seminario, para una lectura 
intensiva analitico-critica de obras selectas de los 
teologos hispanos y latinoamericanos actualmente 
mas influyentes, representando distintas tradiciones 
y posiciones en su consideracion de las afirma- 
ciones fundamentals de la fe y en las cuestiones 
mas discutidas en la reflexion teologica de hoy. 
Prereq: TH 301H y TH 302H, equivalente o per- 
miso del instructor. 
Mottesi T 6-8:40 P.M. Spring 

S'WTS 05-612S 
Fundamental Theology 1 

Anthropology (sin, grace, faith) and Christology 
(incarnation, atonement): A constructive, rather 
than historical, approach which examines these 
fundamental Christian doctrines within the con- 
text of modem and contemporary philosophy, his- 
tory of religion, sociology, etc. Middler standing or 
permission of the instructor required. Limit 25. 
Stevenson WF 9-10:50 Spring 

TEDSST751 
Hermeneutics 

The science of biblical interpretation widi exami- 
nation and explanation of the various systems of 
such. Using selected passages of Scripture, the dis- 
ciplines necessary in biblical interpretation come 
to be understood and developed. 
Osborne TEA Spring 

TEDSPR511 
Apologetics 

The nature, methods, and issues involved in 
defending a Christian world view: including reli- 
gious knowledge, the existence of God, the incar- 
nation of God in Christ, the problem of miracle, 
and the authority of Scripture. 
P. Feinberg TBA Spring 



XL THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

CTU T 556 

Christology of St, Bonaventure 

A detailed study of the Christology of a major 
Doctor of the Church. The major concern will be 



90 



Theological Studies 



with the diverse dimensions of this style of 

Christology and the presuppositions that make it 

possible to unify these dimensions in a coherent 

Christology. 

Hayes TTh 104 J : 15 Sprir\g 

G'ETS 21-635 

African Theology: Tradition and Liberation 

An investigation of traditional African religions 
and beliefs, with emphasis on theological motifs. 
Exploration of the influence of African theology on 
a theology of liberation. Special emphasis on writ- 
ings of selected African and American theologians. 
Young TTK3;30'5 Spring 

G-ETS 21-643 

Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought 

An analysis of the major theological currents in 
modem Judaism and their relationship to general 
philosophy and theology. History of the Jewish 
communities, their institutions, and problems in 
the last 200 years. Examination of the religious 
structure of the contemporary Jewish cormnunity. 
One-half unit. 
Schaalman W 5:30-7:20 P.M. Spring 

LSTC T-434 

Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

The course consists of an in-depth analysis of the 
theology and praxis of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 
wrestling with the philosophical and theological 
principles he employed and their relevance in 
today's theological marketplace. 
Pero UW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

LSTC T-532 

Twentieth Century Theology from 

Barth to Pannenberg 

The aim of this course is to construct a road map of 
theology from the beginning of the twentieth cen- 
tury to the present. The major themes and schools 
will be analyzed on the basis of primary sources, 
guided by an interest in finding meaningful pat- 
terns and explaining significant developments. 
Braaten TF 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTCAITS T-459H 

Temas Principales de la Teologia 

Hispanoamericana (Major Themes in Hispanic 

American Theology) 

Este curso se propone familiarizar a los estudiantes 

con varies de los temas que caracterizan la preente 

reflexion teologica Hispano-americana en los 

Estados Unidos y America Latina. Se estudiaran los 

siguientes temas: el desafio de los pobres a la mision 

y ministerio de la iglesia, la doctrina de Dios, la 



nueva conciencia de la iglesia y la perspectiva de la 

mujer. 

]. Rodriguez MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

MTS T-414 

Studies in Reformed Theology 

A theological exploration of the distinctive charac- 
ter of Reformed theology. Emphasis upon under- 
standing "thinking within a tradition." Includes 
study of selected writings and confessional docu- 
ments. Special attention to the Confession of 1967, 
to determine whether it is a Reformed document. 
Burkhart MWlO-ll :50 Spring 

M/L TS 322 

Literature for Liberal Religion 

An examination of the methodological issues 
raised by efforts to identify a "classical literature" 
for liberal religion in the context of the reading of 
selected non-biblical texts. 



Godbey/St£^ 



TBA 



Spring 



NPTS THEO-226/LSTC M-479 
Discipleship in Bonhoeffer 

This seminar will read closely the text of The Cost 
of Discipleship so that students are led into the 
Bonhoeffer written corpus. Emphasis will be upon 
the development of the christological, ecclesiologi- 
cal and ethical themes under the rubric of disciple- 
ship. The course will consist of class discussion of 
the text and support for individual students' explo- 
rations of other material in Bonhoeffer or of related 
themes in writers and thinkers from their own tra- 
dition. The convenors will bring to the text their 
own differing backgrounds in the Lutheran, 
Anabaptist and Pietist traditions. Taught at NPTS. 
F.B. Nelson/Rochelk/D. Brown M 7-10 P.M. Spring 

S-WTS 05 -625 S 

Study of a Theologian: Wolfhart Pannenberg 

An examination of the theology of Pannenberg 
which will focus upon this understanding of 
hermeneutics, historical consciousness, anthropolo- 
gy, and Christology. The course will be conducted 
as an ongoing colloquium. Reading will include 
Revelation as History, selections from Basic 
Questions Theology (3 vols.), and Jesus: God and 
Man. 
Stevenson MW 3-4:50 Spring 

IIL SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTU T 435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning ori- 



91 



Theological Studies 



gins, evil, and finality. This course focuses princi- 
pally on the Christian tradition with only occa- 
sional references to similar themes in world reli- 



gions. 
Hayes 



MV78;30-9:45 



Spring 



CTU T 436 

Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness 

A study of the notion of myth, mythic conscious- 
ness and the way myths are used in the Bible and in 
various cultures to express the origin of the world 
and humankind, the origin of evil, and the individ- 
ual and collective end. 
Bevam TTK 1 J '30-12:45 Spring 

CTU I 444 

Priesthood in the Roman Catholic Tradition 

A study of the origins of the Christian presbyterate 
in the early Church, its gradual transformation as 
the Church becomes a political power, its reforma- 
tion in the sixteenth century, its image from the 
seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, and its 
renewal at Vatican II. 
Linivm MW 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU T 446 

The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

After a review of the theological foundations of 
missions, this course will explore the missionary 
nature of the Church and the constituent ele- 
ments of that missionary enterprise, e.g., evange- 
lization, social justice, prophetic witness, spirituali- 
ty- 
Phelps MW 1 1 :30A2:45 Spring 

CTU E 486 

Marriage as a Sacrament 

This course will examine the history and develop- 
ment of the theology of marriage in the Roman 
Catholic tradition. Special attention will be given 
to the sacramental character of marriage, dimen- 
sions of married life itself, and the importance of 
the virtue of fidelity. 
Wadell UW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU T 506 

Models of Contextual Theology 

A study of the necessity and possibility of contex- 
tual theology and of six models which attempt to 
articulate a faith that takes culture seriously: the 
anthropological, translation, praxis, synthetic, 
semiotic and transcendtal models. Representative 
contextual theologians will be studied and ana- 
lyzed. 
Bevam MW 10-11:15 Spring 



CTU T 545 

Special Questions in Ecclesiology 

This seminar will study the principle and practice 
of subsidiarity as it applies to the relations between 
the Church of Rome and other local churches in 
the patristic,medieval, and modem areas. 
Linnan M 1-3:30 Spring 

CTS TEC 408 

Religion and the Problem of Historicism 

This seminar will examine the revival of histori- 
cism and its implications for religious thought, 
including works by Maclntyre, Rorty, Stout, 
Bernstein, and West. 
Dyson Th 9-1 2:40 Spring 

CTS TEC 417 
Testimonies of the Spirit 

A careful reading of certain major spiritual autobi- 
ographies such as Augustine's Confessions, Pascal's 
Pensees, Tolstoy's My Confession, Woolman's 
Journal and Hammarskj old's Markings for theologi- 
cal insight and the illumination of Christian exis- 
tence. 
LeFevre T 9-12:40 Spring 

CTS TEC 497 

Perspectives on Racism and Sexism 

A seminar directed at heightening awareness of the 
magnitude and interdependent nature of sexual 
and racial oppression. The sessions will develop a 
socio- theological framework for analysis and for 
effective ministerial response within the context of 
church and society. 
Eugene M 2-5 Spring 

CTS TEC 580 

Exorcism: Ritual and Liberaticm in 

Human Spirituality 

A cross-cultural study of exorcism in the contest of 
human healing. Both religion and psychotherapeu- 
tic perspectives will be included. 
Moore W 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 21-602 

Process Philosophy and Theology 

Process philosophy as a reformation of traditional 
Christian understandings of God, persons, and 
world; and the use of process perspectives and cate- 
gories to do theology. With consideration of 
Whitehead, Teilhard, Hartshorne, Ogden, Cobb, 
Pictenger and Williams. 
Will TTh 9-10:50 Spring 



92 



Theological Studies 



LSTC T-540 
Theological Anthropology 

This course will encompass two basic intentions: to 
survey the traditional Christian theological sources 
of the doctrine of the human being; and to reflect 
upon what is required if this tradition is to be artic- 
ulated meaningfully today. 
Hefner W 7-9:50 P.M. Spring 

LSTC T574 
Religion and Science 

These lectures will set forth the instructor's con- 
structive proposals for understanding and interre- 
lating science and religion, both historically and in 
contemporary life. Attention will be given to his- 
torical, sociological, philosophical and theological 
considerations. 
GOkey TTh 2:30-3 :45 Spring 

LSTC T604 

Graduate Theological Seminar: 

Issues and Options 

Third in a series of three required seminars for 
graduate students in theology. Will focus on the 
essential issues that Christian theology must deal 
with today and assess the ways in which various 
schools of thought are dealing with these issues. 
Bertram T 7-9:50 P.M. Spring 

LSTCT672 

Advanced Religion and Science Seminar 

This seminar includes both faculty and students 
and deals each year with a specific field within the 
field of religion and science. (For post-M.Div. stu- 
dents. Admission of others by consent of instruc- 
tor.) 
GilhertlBurhoe, Staff U 7-9:50 P.M. Spring 

MTS T409 
Church and Kingdom 

A seminar on theological issues related to the mis- 
sion of the Church in and for the world. Included 
are such topics as the relation of Christianity and 
other religions, the vision of the universal commu- 
nity, and the missionary task of the Church, the 
hope for salvation, and the Kingdom of God. 
Pari<er F 9-1 1 :50 Spring 

MTS 412 
Doctrine of God 

Does God exist? How can God be known? What is 
the nature of God? These questions and others sur- 
rounding the existence and attributes of God will 
be raised and addressed. Wide-ranging resources 
(early trinitarian controversies, philosophical argu- 



ments, and contemporary challenges to and recon- 
structions of the doctrine of God) will be used. 
Prereq: T-300 or equiv. 
Case-Winters T 1-3:50 Spring 

UTSTA28 
Life of Faith 

Considers basic aspects of Christian personal exis- 
tence. The life of faith is interpreted as a conver- 
sion to God and neighbor, with rhythms of forgive- 
ness and renewal, discernment and commitment, 
and praise and justice highlighted. Prereq: an intro- 
ductory course in theology. 
Parker T 6:30-9:30 P.M. Spring 

MS S304 

Latin American Liberation Theology 

This course will discuss the principal themes, 
methods, and claims of liberation theology as it has 
developed in Latin America, Authors to be studied 
will include Gustavo Gutierrez, Leonardo Boff, and 
Jon Sobrino. 
LeFebure TBA Spring 

MSS421 

Religious Experience 

Psychological and theological implications of faith 
experience. Christian life today; its meaning and 
symbolism in a scientific world. 
Meyer TBA Spring 

NETS TH 431 

Hermeneutics and Liberation Theology 

This course will examine hermeneutic theory and 
concrete application in theological formations ori- 
ented by the motif of liberation in its socio-politi- 
cal contexts. Works by Latin American, Black and 
feminist theologians will be carefully examined 
with a view toward acquiring an understanding of 
the hermeneutical and constructive issues in move- 
ment from the biblical text. Prereq: Previous work 
in theology. 
Sharp Th 6-8 :40 p.m. Spring 

NBTSTH511 

Doctrine of Reconciliation in the 

Theology of Karl Barth 

This seminar will consist of a reading of one or two 
volumes of the Church Dogmadccs and is intended 
as a general introduction to the theology of Barth 
by focusing on the central themes of Chris to logy 
and the doctrine of Reconciliation. Prereq: Basic 
theology sequence or permission of the instructor. 
Dayton Th 7 -9:40 P.M. Spring 




93 



Theological Studies /Ethical Studies 



Religion and Society Studies 



S-WTS 05-630S 

Classics of Mystical Theology 

A seminar exploring diverse traditions of Christian 
mystical theology through careful reading of classic 
texts. TTieologians to be considered will vary from 
year to year. Possibilities include Gregory of Nyssa, 
John Cassian, Bernard of Clairvaux, Richard of St. 
Victor, Bonaventur, Meister Eckhart, Julian of 
Norwich, Gregory Palamas, Catherine of Siena, 
Terisa of Avib, and others. 
Barker W 1^3:50 Spring 

TEDS ST845 

Biblical Theology of Worship and Prayer 

A biblical and theological study of the doctrines of 

worship and prayer, with particular attention given 

to the relationship between these doctrines and the 

character of God, the nature of new covenant 

Christian experience and application in every day 

life. 

Grudem TBA Spring 



ETHICAL STUDIES 

1. MORAL THEOLOGY 



CTU E 375 

Introduction to Social Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Fornosari TTK 1 1 .-30- J 2 -.45 



G-ETS 21/22-503 
Theological Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
TBA TBA 



Spring 



Sprir\g 



CTU E 570 

Revolution/Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 

An examination of various interpretations of revo- 
lution/liberation as they have emerged in classical 
Western political philosophy. Third World thought 
and present-day theological and ethical literature. 
Special attention will be given to Latin American 
liberation theology. 
PaufUkowski TJ-3;30 Strrmg 

CTU E 574 

The Moral Life in Literature 

This course will examine dimensions, themes and 
issues in the moral life dirough works of literature, 
both classic and modern. Among authors to be 
studied are Mary Gordon, Mark Twain, Saul 
Bellow, and Walker Percy. 
WcdeU M 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

MTSE-314 

Introducticm to Contemporary Christian Ethics 

This course has three parts. The first part answers 
the questions: "What is Christian ethics?" and 
"How is Christian ethics done?" The second part is 
a brief survey of contemporary Christian ethical 
thoughts. The last part applies the approaches to 
doing Christian ethics to a current ethical problem. 
HadseR MW 1041:50 Spring 

S'WTS 08-610S 

Anglican Identity and the Christian Life 

This course begins with the question of what is dis- 
tinctive about Anglican identity and then tests this 
understanding by a close reading and assessment of 
selected Anglican thinkers. 
Sedgwick TTh9'10:50 Spring 



IL SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

CCPM/CTS TEC 435/MTS E-435 
Seminar on Feminist Theological Ethics 

Exploration of issues in feminist theological ethics 
through a study of the writings of Katie Cannon, 
Beverly Harrison, Mary Pellauer, Rosemary 
Ruether, and others. Attention to intepretations of 
ethical theory and moral practice in the light of 
women's experience; gender, race and class; the 
public/private distinction; feminist theological per- 
spectives on sexuality, family, work, poverty, and 
violence. Prereq: Intro to Theology course. Fees 
may apply; see p. 18. 
Livezey/Thisdedx'waite T 2-4:50 Spring 



TEDS ST715 
Christian Ethics 

Biblical perspectives on contemporary ethical 
issues facing the church and the minister: divorce, 
abortion, euthanasia, genetic control, sex, war, 
racism, ecology, personal life style, and the church's 
social responsibilities. 
Brown TBA Spring 



RELIGION AND 
SOCIETY STUDIES 

BTS 1-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Wagner T 3 : J 0-4:40 Spring 



94 



Religion and Society Studies 



BTS 1-358 

Contemporaty Pacifist Issues 

\j Historic attitudes toward questions of peace; con- 
temporary issues related to violence and nonvio- 
lence; definitions, theologians, biblical doctrines, 
and strategies all will be discussed in the context of 
seeking biblical and theological bases for peace- 
making. May include participation in a joint semi- 
nar on the historic peace church seminaries in 
Washington, D.C. 
Brown TTh 1 1 A 2:20 Spring 

CCPM/CTS CM 468 

Ministry and the Criminal Justice System 

This course will explore the theological, ethical 
and pastoral issues of people incarcerated in prisons 
and jails and will examine the nature of ministry in 
\ the criminal justice system. Permission of instructor 
required. Fees may apply; see p. 18. 
Thamton M 6:30-9;30 P.M. Spring 

CCPM/CTS/LSTC/MTS M-490 
The Church and the Health Care: 
Toward a New Vision 

An exploration of current challenges to the health 
of citizens and alternatives to the provision of 
health care in our society, with special attention to 
the role of the church and its alliance with other 
community institutions and citizens. Fees may 
apply; see p. 18. 
Wind/Young/ Ashby Th 2-5 Spring 

CCPM/CTS/LSTC/MTS M-49 1 

Practicum in Public Ministry: 

The Church and Health Care Systems 

To be taken with CCPM/CTS/LSTC/MTS M-490. 
The Practicum in Public Ministry is a supervised 
internship/field education program, combining 
field experience with on-site visits and action- 
reflection groups. Students will be placed in alter- 
native health care programs, local clinics, etc., 
exploring options for quality and affordable health 
care for the 1990s. Fees may apply; see p. 18. 
' StockujeU et d. F 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 22-502 

The Church and Social Systems 

Outline of the stances taken by churches toward 
society in different contexts. Various types of social 
systems, such as patriarchy, racism, liberal democra- 
cy, socialism, economic neocolonialism, and mili- 
tarism. Formulation of ethical principles for 
Christian relations to these social systems and 
models of ministry. 
Ruether Mi:30-4:30 Spring 



G-ETS 22-636 

Religious Issues in American Television 

A phenomenological analysis of television as a sys- 
tem of entertairunent and information^ an econom- 
ic power, a political mediator and force, and a 
means of social control; exploration of their rela- 
tionship to the religious themes of law and justice, 
grace and liberation. 
FoTshey MW 3:30-5 Spring 

MS S349/H365 

Theology and the Public Realm in Twentieth 

Century America 

(For course description, see Historical Studies IV). 
Lefebure/Zielmski TBA Spring 

SCUPEB-TH 303/CCPM/CTS 

Public Issues in Urban Pastoral Ministry 

The integration of students' study and experiences 
in urban pastoral ministry into a wholistic perspec- 
tive on theology and practice is the goal of this 
course. In teams, students select issues to be 
explored, such as family life styles, public welfare, 
employment, and make weekly presentations that 
include sociological/cultural and practical aspects. 
4 hours. Fees may apply; see pp. 18-19. 
Whiten 7 942 Spring 

SCUPEM303 

Functional Relationship Between 

Church and Community 

Local city churches respond in different ways to 
changes in the neighborhood around them. Factors 
involved in these responses include the interaction 
of members' personal faith, culture and situation. 
This course examines the interactions; the rela- 
tionship of resources, such as location, leadership, 
available funding; and the theology, commitment 
and situation that sustains or diminishes local 
church growth. 4 hours. Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Dudley TKa.M. Spring 

SCUPEM305 

Globalization and Urbanization: 

Challenges for the Church 

This course offers selected readings, reflective jour- 
nal assignments, and group discussions to augment 
the 1990 Congress on Urban Ministry. Designed as 
a resource event to address the world-wide factors 
of urbanization and globalization, the Congress will 
make use of speakers from a variety of geographical, 
theological and denominational perspectives. 
Course participants may select from: worship and 
spirituality; service and justice issues; community 
and economic development, church life and struc- 
tures; missiology, theology and evangelism; and 




95 



Religion and Society Studies 



World Mission Studies 



international corporate/church partnerships. 

Variable credit. Intensive. Fees may apply; see p. 

19. 

Bakke 412-6 Strring 

S-WTS lO'SOlS 
Church and Community 

This basic, introductory course on church and soci- 
ety, beginning with the development of the church 
in the modern world, will give consideration to sec- 
ularization, the church as a voluntary association, 
die functions of the church in society, and specific 
community studies. 
Sedgwick TTK 3 -4 ;50 Spring 



WORLD MISSION 
STUDIES 



CTU B 490 

Biblical Foundations for Mission 

(For course description, see Biblical Studies — 

General.) 

BergantJBowe TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU 1 565 

Advanced Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry 

Designed for those with extensive cross-cultural 
experience desiring to understand the theory, prin- 
ciples and process of training others, and becoming 
a guide/counselor. Emphasis is placed on Rites of 
Passage, liminality, personal and social transforma- 
tion, globalization, and adult education models for 
cross-cultural training, global misssion and min- 
istry. Three or six credits. 
Barbour/Doidge MW 1-2:15 Spring 

CTU W 547 

Power, Dreams, Ancestors and 

Healing in Africa 

This course, by arrangement, is for individuals or 
small groups. It is open only to those with W 545 
or equivalent, plus significant missionary experi- 
ence. Consult instructor in Fall for Spring. 
Gittins TTh 11:30-12 :45 Spring 

CTU W 595 

Mission Integration Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
BarbourfKaserou) M 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

CTU W 598 

World Mission Colloquium 

This is a team-taught seminar designed to address 



inter-faith dialogue. Participants will discuss their 
own experiences of dialogue and address major 
concerns that emerge out of their experience. They 
will enter into the collective memory of another 
faith tradition and strive to appropriate its core 
experience. Faculty and members of other faith tra- 
ditions will assist. Prereq: at least one year of full- 
time mission ministry. 
Kaserouf TBA Sprir\g 

LSTCW-422 

The Church in the People's Republic of China 

An examination of recent developments in the 
People's Republic of China with reference to the 
reopening of churches, the burgeoning of Christian 
house gatherings, and the role of the church in 
Chinese society. Includes discussion of the search 
for a post-denominational Chinese Christian iden- 
tity, the training of clergy and lay leadership, and 
relations to the worldwide Christian community. 
Vikner TF 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTCW-513 
Ecumenical Dialogues 

The seminar, together with resource persons who 
are actually engaged in interconfessional dialogues, 
is designed to examine major findings, dealing with 
such topics as ecumenical methodology, interdy- 
namics of bilateral and multilateral talks, and con- 
cept of unity and models of union. 
Ishida MW 1-2:15 Spring 

NPTSMNST-152 

Mission Strategy and Methodology 

Church growth strategies, methods of evangeliza- 
tion and discipleship, theological education in the 
Third World and missionary/national relationships 
are some of the topics considered. 
Reed MWTK(F) 2-4 Spring 

NBTS ME 30IH 

Hacia una Teologia Hispana de la Evangelizaci«i 

(Toward a Hispanic Theology of Evangelism) 

Consideracion de presupuestos biblico-teologicos 
de la evangelizacion por medio de realidades funda- 
mentales tales como el Senorio de Cristo, el pecado 
de la humanidad, el amor santo de Dios, la obra del 
Espiritu, la dinamica y universalidad del kerygma y 
la importancia de la fe hecha discipulado. El con- 
text© sera las situaciones hispanas de los EE.UU. y 
la America Latina. 
Zapata M 6-8:40 P.M. Spring 

NBTS ME 402 

Missiology 

This course introduces the Christian global mission 



96 



World Mission Studies/History of Religions 



Ministry Studies 



and the role of the Church and the individual in 
that mission. Students examine contemporary mis- 
siological issues from historical, theological, geo- 
graphical and organizational perspectives; partici- 
pate in a two-day area mission conference; acquire 
resources for a responsible local church mission 
strategy; and formulate a personal philosophy of 
mission. 
Staff Th 7-9:40 P.M. Spring 



HISTORY OF 
RELIGIONS 



LSTCW.431 

Japanese Religions in C<»itext 

The response of an original folk religion to succes- 
sive incursions of Buddhism, Confucianism, and 
Christianity is traced through the ages. The so- 
called "New Religions" and their traditional roots 
make Japan an exciting laboratory for religious 
study, as a highly developed technological society 
resists the organized Christian church but creative- 
ly adapts certain Christian influences. 
W.Dar)ker TTK 8:30-9 .-45 Spring 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

1. THE NATURE AND 
PRACTICE OF MINISTRY 

BTS M-473 

Ministry in a Multiethnic and Multicultural 

Society 

An examination of various models of ethnic and 

cross-cultural ministries. The course will provide 

students with an opportunity to think through 

their own models of ministry and theological 

understanding in a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural 

society. 

Uatsuoka W 1-3:45 Spring 

BTS 1-421 
Covenantal Identity: 
Growth in Faith Community 

This course explores tlie significance of central bib- 
lical covenants for Christian formation, perception, 
and service in various life contexts. Our investiga- 
tors will be guided by Biblical material and inter- 
pretation, perspectives on human development and 
the moral life, and concerns for the practice of 
ministry. 
Meyer/Richer TTK 9:30-10:50 Spring 



GTS GM 309b 

Reading the Signs of the Gongregation 

(Second half of a two-quarter seminar. For course 

description, see Fall.) 

Owens TBA Spring 

GTS GM 462 

Pastoral Ministry with Black Families 

Seminar assessing specific pastoral concerns/needs 
of Black families in contemporary American urban 
settings. An understanding of historical model of 
church as extended family provides basis for exami- 
nation of: ecclesiological dimensions of Black fami- 
ly life; family socialization/survival patterns; emerg- 
ing life-styles/challenges confronting Black cou- 
ples/families; ethical understandings of Black love 
and sexuality. 
Eugene T 630-9:30 P.M. Spring 

G'ETS 34-506 
Pastor and People 

Roles and responsibilities of the pastor as reflective 
practitioner in relationship with the people of God, 
grounded in a theology of the church and ministry. 
Congregational analysis and empowerment; issues 
of pastoral identity, authority, spirituality and lead- 
ership. Practical guidance for pastoral visitation, 
time management, parish transitions, church 
administration, weddings and funerals. Limit: 25. 
Wingeier MW 3:30-5 Spring 

LSTGM-421 

Jewish Perspectives on Ministry 

A basic overview of contemporary Jewish thought 
and practice as an orientation to ministry in a plu- 
ralistic community, and with a special focus on 
Jewish resources for Christian ministry: liturgical 
traditions, scholarly materials, homiletical 
resources. Other issues will also be explored, and 
visits to local Jewish institutions will be included. 
Berman WF 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTGM-452 

Senior Seminar 111 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Bozeman/TBAM 11-12:15;W 11:15-12:30 Spring 

LSTG/MTS M-495 
Beyond Survival: VisicMi for 
Congregations in a New Age 

If congregations are to be staging areas for captivat- 
ing, exciting, fulfilling and faithful ministry, then 
they must move beyond insular styles of ministry 
that focus upon maintenance. This course is a 
research project which attempts to find through 
historical documents and living examples through- 



97 



Ministry Studies 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 



out the world those congregations where creative, 
life-giving ministries exist. Along the way we will 
encounter the topics of conflict management, 
mutual ministry and intradenominational and ecu- 
menical relationships. 
AshhyfUndberg T 2:30-5 Spring 

MTS M-437 

Ministry in Church Conflicts 

This course is an intensive which is taught in three 
blocks of time: two consecutive weekends from 1-9 
Friday, 9-4:30 Saturday, one final Saturday 1-4:30. 
The first weekend involves a learning process for 
managing church conflicts. The second weekend 
involves using videotape to practice assertive plans 
of management. The third Saturday involves clari- 
fying any remaining concerns. Limit: 15. 
Halverstadt Intensive (TBA) Spring 

MTS M.449 

Surviving and Thriving in Multiple Staff Ministries 

Working with other pastors, secretaries, organists 
and choir directors. This course explores the rela- 
tionship between a theology of the church and 
leadership styles, models for ministry, and personal 
and professional identity, with particular attention 
to collegiality and gender issues in ministry. 
BlockJJohnstone W I -3 :50 Spring 

MTSA^TCM.451H 

Seniinario de Pastoral Hispana 

(Hispanic Ministries Seminar) 

Este curso busca integral la teoria y la practica de la 

pastoral en el contexto hispano. Combinara tres 

elementos basicos: el entendimiento actual del par- 

ticipante en esta tarea, los recursos disponibles y la 

formulacion personal de la pastoral integrando los 

otros deos elementos. 

RodrigueZ'DUvJRodriguez W 6:30-9:30 P.M. Spring 

NPTS MNST-268 

Lay -Centered Church Planting 

Pastoral leadership in training lay people to do the 
task of church planting. Attention is given to both 
home Bible studies and discipleship as two major 
complementary strategies for church parenting and 
church multiplication. 
Reed W 7- JO P.M. Spring 

NETS MN 540 

Senior Seminar on Pastoral Ministry 

This course focuses on the practice of pastoral min- 
istry. It will consider the roles, tasks, duties and 
work of the pastor, and will explore various issues 
surrounding those roles. Attention will also be 
given to the pastor as a person. 
Chapman W 2:30-5:10 Spring 



TEDSNT631 
Women and the Church 

A study of the biblical examples and teachings 
regarding women, along with consideration of his- 
torical, sociological and other factors, which pro- 
vide guidance as to the ways in which women can 
participate in the ministry of the church. 
LiefeldlTucker TBA Spring 



IL SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTl Seminar (=MS H454, NPTS MNST-206, 

TEDS PT 875) 

Prayer and Life in the Spirit 

This course is designed to provide both students 
and professors with an opportunity to explore, 
through study and applied experience, the roots 
and the historical development of theological pre- 
suppositions underlying spiritual traditions in 
Christianity. Meets at various locations. 
Enrollment limited. 
Cunningham/Weborg TBA Spring 

BTS M-450 

Lived Spirituality: Inheritance of Holocaust: 

The War in Vietnam 

The course will explore ancient and new spirituali- 
ties through the medium of the novel. Students 
will encounter other spiritual journeys to gain a 
better understanding of such and to illumine and 
better express their own. One credit hour. 
MeyerlMay 4/6-8 Weekend Intensive Spring 

CTU H 49IB 

Women Mystics in the Fourteenth 

and Fifteenth Centuries 

We continue to explore the contributions made to 
the life of the Church by some prominent women 
in the Middle Ages. We will study the personality, 
writings, experiences and activities of this period. 
Special focus will be given to Catherine of Siena, 
mystic, preacher and doctor, Catherine of Genoa, 
mystic and married lay woman, and Julian of 
Norwich, anchoress and mystic. 
Lozano TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU M 418 

Christian Mysticism in Theological Reflection 

A study of the theology and spirituality of classic 

mystical sources in Christian tradition. 

Lozano TTh J 1 :30- J 2:45 Spring 



98 



Spirituality and Spiritual Direction 



Pastoral Care 



CTU 1 530 

Iconography: Theory and Practice 

An in-depth study of Eastern Iconography with 
attention to history, theology and spirituaUty, cou- 
pled with visits to local churches and guest lectures 
by experienced iconographers who will give 
instruction in the techniques of "writing" an icon. 
Limited enrollment. 
Chjrovsky TEA Spring 

CTU T 575 
Black Spirituality 

Spirituality as the manner in which one encounters 
die Divine is conditioned by factors of history, race, 
gender, cultural and ecclesial customs. This semi- 
nar will engage students in a critical examiriation 
of the African roots, development and characteris- 
tics of the spirituality of African- Americans forged 
in the redemptive suffering of slavery and Black life 
in the United States. 
Phelps M 7-9 -30 p.m. Spring 

NPTSMNST.103 

Spiritual Formation 111: Spiritual Disciplines 

The course offers instruction and practice in a vari- 
ety of ways in which the disciplines help to foster 
and sustain faith, hope and love in the life of the 
believer. One hour. 
Faculty T 8-9:50 Spring 

NPTS THEO'221/LSTC M.479 
Discipleship in Bonhoeffer 

(For course description, see Theological Studies II.) 
F.B. Nelson/RochellefD. Brown M 7-10 P.M. Spring 

S-WTS 06-5018 
Spirituality for Ministry 

An introduction to types of spirituality and spiritu- 
al disciplines, resources for personal and profession- 
al formation, and the role of spirituality in the 
practical life of the church. 
Barker TTh 1-2:50 Spring 

TEDS PT845 

Advanced Spiritual Formation 

Lectures and discussions focusing on the history of 

spirituality in its myriads of patterns. 

Larsen TBA Spring 



111. PASTORAL CARE 

BTS M-447 

Assessment in Pastoral Ministry 

A course focusing on the student's ability to make 



assessments of a variety of situations including indi- 
vidual, group, systems, psychological and political. 
Assessments help decide which actions need to be 
taken and from which need to be refrained. 
Garrison WF 8-9:20 Spring 

BTS M-381 

Introduction to Pastoral Care & Counseling 

The purpose of this course is to give a broad 
overview of the field of Pastoral Care and 
Counseling. Students will read in psychology, pas- 
toral counseling from a Black perspective and pas- 
toral care and the life cycle. Students will dialogue 
in dyads, experience self-help groups, and develop a 
pastoral plan of action. 
Garrison WF 10:40-12 Stning 

CTU M 405 

Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Anderson TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU M 409 

Pastoral Care to Specific Groups 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Staff TBA Spring 

CTU M 579 

Pastoral Care and Hermeneutics 

The task of pastoral care is to help people translate 
and interpret the stories of their lives. This course 
will explore the relationship between the interpre- 
tation of texts and the interpretation of persons as 
a way of understanding hermeneutics as a method- 
ological resource for pastoral care. 
Anderson W 1-3:30 Spring 

CTSCM331 

Introduction to Pastoral Care & Moral Guidance 

Critical overview of several basic texts in pastoral 
care. Involves theoretical understanding of 
approaches to caring/counseling as well as reflec- 
tion upon/integration of the student as pastor, min- 
ister and counselor. Attention given to pastoral 
care as a dimension of practical theology. Includes 
study of different types of pastoral care situations. 
MillerfMcLemore TBA SpriT)g 

CTS CM 436 

Death and Dying: The Theologians Speak 

Examines historial and contemporary interpreta- 
tions of death in medcine, psychology, theology, 
with focus on variety of theological and religious 
responses (Augustine, Calvin, Tillich, Ramsey, 
Noiuwen, Soelle, Hey ward). Some critical reflec- 
tion of moral and religious horizons of various psy- 



99 



Pastoral Care 



chologies and medical technology. Provides oppor- 
tunicy to integrate various theoretical understand- 
ings with personal impressions and views. 
Miller/McLemore M 9-12:40 Spring 

CTS CM 472 

House Church Leadership Intensive 

Experiencing, theological reflection, and leadership 
skills training go hand in hand in this course, 
which utilizes and adapts the insights of Gestalt, 
Psychosyn thesis, Bioenergetics, journal writing, 
fantasy, and meditation as pathways for personal 
growth and religious experiencing, and for revitaliz- 
ing the church. 
Anderson 6110-6/15 Intensive Spring 

CTS CH 505/CM 544 

The Meaning of Suffering: The Book of Job 

and Contemporary Psychology 

(For course desription, see Biblical Studies, Old 

Testament 111.) 

LcCocquelMiUer-McLemore W 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 32-608 

The Dream as a Hermeneutical Tool 

Exploration of the dream as a way by which indi- 
viduals express the felt meanings of their lives and 
as a way of understanding human dynamics. 
Attention given to various approaches to dream 
interpretation as well as to possible application to 
the biblical texts. Students are expected to keep a 
personal dream diary as part of the seminar course. 
Limit: 9. Prereq: 32-501 and permission of the 
instructor. 
Ashbrook MW 3 :30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 32-609 

The Working Brain and the Work of Theology 

The knowledge of the way the brain works — neu- 
ropsychologically — is used as an analytical 
metaphor to organize the human condition in his- 
torical and theological expressions. These are 
assessed as to adequate, deficient, or disturbed func- 
tioning for the purpose of identifying ways to 
enhance fuller human functioning. A seminar. 
Limit: 24. Level II and III students. Prereq: 32-501. 
Ashbrook TT/i 3:30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 32-612 

Cultural Dynamics and Pastoral Ministry 

Significance and impact of cultural dynamics of 
persons, groups, and societies in relation to require- 
ments for effective ministries of maintenance 
(care) and intervention (change). Review of stu- 
dent's own cultural assumptions, world view, and 



value system in light of cultural change and 
requirements for effective ministry to persor« and 
groups with other assumptions, world views, and 
value systems. Prereq: 32-501. 
Hmkle MW 3:30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 32-631 

Pastoral Counseling: The Pastor as Counselor 

Exposure to the theory and practice of pastoral 
counseling for the prospective parish pastor. 
Emphasis given to counseling skill development as 
well as to theological and psychological models of 
interpretation. Prereq: 32-501. 
Hinkk M 7-10 P.M. Spring 

G-ETS 32-635 

Pastoral Care and Inner Healing 

An exploration of the relationship of emotions to 
the health of persons and how prayer within the 
pastoral counseling and care process can facilitate 
wholeness, correlating secular psychological and 
therapeutic findings with the biblical aspect of 
healing. Readings, theories developed by pastoral 
counselors, and the student's healing resources will 
be used. 
Wmberly 6-8:50 P.M. Spring 

LSTC M-320 
Pastoral Care 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Swanson M 8:30-9:45; W8:l5-9:30 Spring 

TEA Mn-l2:l5;W 11:15-12:30 Spring 

LSTCM-535 
Psychology of Religion 

A study of psychology's attempt to give a systemat- 
ic description and clinical analysis of a person's 
religious experience and behavior. Consideration 
will be given to the perspectives and contributions 
of leaders in the field such as James, Leuba, Pratt, 
Boisen, Clark, Allport, Pruyser, as well as the posi- 
tions of Freud arid Jung. 
Swanson MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

LSTC M-622C and F 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Swanson TEA Sprir)g 

MTSM-443 

Issues of Human Development in the Church 

This course will examine current literature and 
theory in the area of adult growth with a special 
focus on differences in the developmental journeys 
of females and males. Connections will be made 



100 



Pastoral Care 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



between theories of human development and 
implications for teaching/learning and pastoral care 
in the church. 
Ashhy/CcMujeU F 94 1:50 Spring 

M/L M 535 

Seminar in Religion and Medicine 

Dialogue between a limited number of theological 
and medical students around issues of (1) the 
meaning of illness; (2) death and dying; (3) the 
physician and minister as healers. 
Lauan W 7-10 P.M. Spring 

MSMS412 

Priest as Counselor within the 

Parish Community 

This course will present a model for counseling as 
well as practical experience. The course will pro- 
vide input as well as supervised experience in coun- 
seling. 
Kicarujs TBA Spring 

NPTS MNST.122 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

Marriage eririchment groups are supplemented with 
case method, readings and guest presentations to 
equip counseling and congregational ministries to 
the needs of marriages and families. 
Jackson W 7-10 P.M. Spring 

NPTS MNST-228 

Caring for Those Who Suffer 

The objectives of this course are to develop a theo- 
logical and practical understanding of suffering and 
to equip one another for the care of people who are 
suffering. 
Klingherg Th 2-5 Spring 

NETS PC 404 
Pastoral Care of Women 

This is a theologically based, practice centered 
introduction to issues involved in the pastoral care 
of women, especially by male pastors. This course is 
designed to help women and men deal with those 
factors that will impede effective pastoral care of 
women. 
]ustes 



WF J 0:40- J 2 



Spring 



NETS PC 405 

Human Sexuality in the Context of Pastoral 

Care 

This course is an examination of the place of 
human sexuality in self-fulfillment and self-under- 
standing, especially as it relates to the pastoral care 
ministry of the church. 
Justes WF 2:30-3:50 Spring 



SCUPE PC 303 

Practicum: Conflict Resolution 

Coriflict within Christianity has often been consid- 
ered evil, yet history documents its continued pres- 
ence between churches and between Christian 
individuals. This course examines: 1) the relation- 
ship of theology to conflict, 2) biblical texts on 
conflict, 3) personal styles of conflict avoidance 
and resolution, 4) leadership styles in conflict. 
Students' conflict styles are assessed, and skills are 
taught through modeling and exercises. 2 hours. 
Fees may apply; see p. 19. 
Ideran Th P.M. Spring 



IV. LITURGY AND 
WORSHIP STUDIES 

CTU T 350 

Basic Principles of Catholic Worship 

A basic liturgy course to explore key dimensions, 
forms, and principles of pastoral liturgy through 
lectures, readings, practicum exercises, and study 
projects. Students are to participate in several lab 
sessions on dates announced at the beginning of 
the quarter. 

Foley (A)MW 1041:15 Spring 

Francis (B) T 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

CTU M 474 

Lay Leadership in Prayer 

A practicum in the leadership of the community's 
non-sacramental prayer, including Hours, catechu- 
menate rites, wake and graveside services, penance 
services, services of Word and Communication, 
and ministry to the sick. Students not anticipating 
ordination may work toward worship competency 
in this course. 
Hughes T 7-9:30 P.M. Spring 

CTU T 553 
Readings in Ritual 

Comparative readings and seminar discussion on 
ritual, its nature and function, with a view to 
understanding how liturgical ritual operates. 
Readings will be drawn from such fields as the his- 
tory of religions, cultural anthropology, psychology 
and social psychology. 
Ostdiek T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTU T 555 

Liturgy in a Multi-Cultural Community 

This seminary will explore the complex nature of 
liturgical ministry in a worshiping community com- 
posed of different cultural groups. Guided by the 



I 



101 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 

liturgy documents and anthropological studies on 
ritual, the course will try to address the question, 
"How can liturgy be a source of unity rather than 
division in this setting?" 
Francis M 1-3:30 Spring 

G-ETS 31-616 
Preaching and Worship 

Preparing to lead the church's worship; relation of 
sermon to service; selection, writing, and arrange- 
ment of worship materials; resources for the minis- 
ter. Biblical, historical, and theological criteria for 
worship and preaching will be developed. Services 
and sermons will be given by class member; video- 
tape used in evaluation. Limit: 12. Prereq: 31-501. 
Murphy TTK 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCM-482 
Ethnic Church Music 

The growing repertoires of church music from 
Hispanic, African American, African, and Asian 
sources will be examined from three perspectives: 
textual characteristics; ethnomusicological context 
(form, style, instrumentation, etc.); and current 
usage in the church. Recordings and field experi- 
ence are part of the learning experience. 

rt UWI'2:15 Spnng 



LSTCM-580 
Occasional Services 

The origins, uses, and forms of the Divine Office, 
baptism, confirmation, ordination, marriage, funer- 
al, private communion, private confession. Holy 
Week, services, and the Lutheran sacramentals. 

TTK 8:30-9:45 Spring 



MS S393 

Liturgical Spirituality 

Vatican II asserted that the Eucharist is the "Source 
and summit of the Christian life." The Liturgy of 
the Hours is called "the Prayer of Christians." In 
what ways does liturgical prayer differ from person- 
al prayer? This course will examine these and other 
issues which unite liturgy and spirituality. 
Fischer TBA Spring 

NPTS THEO-202 

Worship: The Church, Sacraments and Liturgy 

The study of worship is the study of God's service 

to the church (word, sacrament) and the church's 

service to God (praise, prayer, proclamation, ritu- 

al). 

Webarg MWTh(F) 9:1540:25 Spring 



Preaching and Communication 

S-WTS 09-522S 
Anglican Worship 

A study of the Book of Common Prayer and the dis- 
tinctive Anglican ethos of worship from the first 
Prayer Book of 1549 and its sources to the 
American Prayer Book of 1979. The structure and 
theology of the various revisions, especially in 
England and the United States. 
MitcheU MW 1-2:50 Spring 

S-WTS 09-60 IS 

Practicum in Liturgical Celebration 

A practicum in the conduct of worship of the 
Book of Common Prayer in accordance with 
Anglican traditions. Attention will be paid to 
"presidential style" with an opportunity for students 
to critique themselves from videotape and to par- 
ticipate in general class critiques. Limited to final 
year students. 

Mitchell T 1-2:50; Spring 

Th 1-2:50 orTh3-4:50 

S-WTS 11-516S 

Introduction to Church Music II 

(For course description, see Fall - S-WTS 11-515S. 

Prereq: 11-515S.) 

Howe MlO-ll;Thll-ll:50 Winter/Spring 



V. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

BTS M-570 

Advanced Seminar in Preaching 

The purpose of the course is to enable students to 
become dynamic public orators by refining their 
preaching skills. As a seminar course, it will consist 
of group study of selected texts, evaluating the 
communication skills of model preachers, field 
observation of selected orators, and coaching in 
individualized practice preaching. 
Taylor V7J-3:45 Spring 

BTS 1-573 

Practicum in Biblical Preaching 

A workshop approach to exegetical skills as it leads 

to communication, the writing of sermons, and the 

delivery of sermons. The student will have the 

opportunity to test several styles of homiletic 

method. 

FauslRoop TTh 8-9:20 Spring 



102 



Preaching and Communication 



CTU M 449 

Communication Skills for Public Ministry 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

TBA UW 11:3042:45 Spring 



CTU M 450 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembley 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
TBA W 8:30-] J 



Spring 



CTU M 451 

Preaching in the Non'Eucharistic Setting 

This course, directed toward the broad dimension 
of preaching in settings other than the Eucharist, 
explores the theology and methodology of preach- 
ing in various types of situations. Students will 
explore the demands and possibilities present for 
the preacher in situatons such as retreats, services 
of Word and Communion, and wake services. 
Prereq: M 449 or equiv. recommended. 
Cannon T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTU T 558 

Research Seminar in Preaching 

Students bring to this seminar their own research 

interests in preaching which are promoted and 

developed through guided readings and discussion 

and a final written report. An underlying goal in 

seminar sessions is the elaboration of a theology of 

preaching. 

Cannon T 8:30-] J Spring 

CTS CM 302 
Preaching 

The theology and practice of the preaching min- 
istry. The approach will emphasize both the art of 
sermon preparation and the place of preaching in 
pastoral ministry. Limited to second and third year 
students. 

Edgerton/Dyson Sec I : MW 9- 10:20 Spring 
Sec. 11: MW 11:20-12:40 

G'ETS 31-501 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Cha^ieU MW 3:30-5:20 Spring 

TBA TBA Spring 

G-ETS 31-603 

Preaching the Christian Year 

Use of the liturgical year in proclaiming the 
Gospel; resources for celebrating the seasons; cre- 
ative use of a lectionary. Study of the significance 
of the church seasons as an aid toward developing a 
preaching program from Advent to Pentecost. 



LimiD 12. Prereq: 3 1-501. 

ChatfieU MW 5:30-7:20 P.M. Spring 

LSTCM.451 
Senior Seminar 11 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Niedenthal/Pero TTh 11-12:15 Spring 

LSTC M-453 
Christianity and Comedy 

What constitutes a comic vision of life, and what 
does that vision contribute to our Christian intelli- 
gence and sensibility? Responses to these questions 
are the focus of this seminar. Readings chiefly in 
fictional works of comedy plus critical essays. 
Niedenthal T 2:30-5 Spring 

MTS M-328 

Preaching in the Black Church 

Preaching in the Black church is both prophetic 
and inspiring, resulting in social and personal 
transformation. In this course we will explore effec- 
tive means through which these dual aims of Black 
preaching can be met. Students will be introduced 
to various styles of Black preaching and aided in 
the development of their own particular style of 
delivering God's word. 
Thomas TBA Spring 

MTS M-332K 

Preaching and Worship in the Korean* 

American Church (Taught in Korean) 

This course introduces the students to styles, 

resources, and content for preaching and worship 

in the church. Special attention will be given to 

creating liturgy and sermons which are appropriate 

to the Korean immigrant, multigenerational 

church. 

D. Kim M 2-3:50 Spring 

M/L M 393 
Poetry as Scripture 

An exploration of pxaetry from all times and places, 
as Scripture. Students will fimiliarize themselves 
with poetry, from classic to contemporary, as texts 
for sermon-making. Practice in oral interpretation 
and homiletics. Workshop format, each student 
will preach three sermons on a poetic text. 
TBA TBA Spring 

NPTSMNST-UO 
Effective Communication 

The pastor must be an effective communicator. 
Basic verbal and non-verbal factors in the delivery 
of a speech will be reviewed and practiced. 
Athnos MWTh(F) 9:15-10:25 Spring 




103 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



NETS MN 383 

The Practice of Preaching 

This supervised lab experience will provide stu- 
dents-preachers with an opportunity to prepare and 
actually deliver sermons. Students will preach at 
least three sermons in class and submit complete 
outlines for worship services in which the sermons 
might be given. Sermons will be critiqued biblically 
and theologically, as well as one of the basis of cri- 
teria for effective communication. Prereq: 
Principles of Preaching. One credit course. 
Staff Sec. I M 2:30-5:J0 Spring 

Sec. 2 M 7-9:40 P.M. 

Sec. 3 '.7 2-4:40 

Sec. 4: T 7-9:40 P.M. 

S-WTS 11-6128 

History of Preaching in the U.S.A. 

A look at the homiletical movements that have 

influenced preaching in North America from the 

Puritan commonwealth to late twentieth-century 

emphasis such as biblical theology, liturgical 

preaching, social activism, problem centered 

preaching. Black preaching, the preaching of 

women, and TV evangelism. One-half unit. 

Edujords W 9-10:50 Spring 



VI. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

CTU M 463 

Wholistic Parish Education 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Lucirdo Spring 

CTU M 565 
Christian Education: 
Remembering for the Future 

Drawing from the insights of the tradition by focus- 
ing on key personalities and classics in literature 
that have influenced the way the Church has 
engaged in its educational ministry, this course will 
seek to discover what the past has bequeathed to 
the present, as well as to identify responses toward 
the future. 
Tebbe W Spring 

CTS CM 322 
Ministry with Youth 

Offering three distinct youth ministry models, this 
course emphasizes team and peer ministry, distinct 
leadership styles, getting in touch with one's own 
adolescence, developmentally based retreats, 
covenantal discipline, and symbol-making. 



Resources and issues of youth will be critical. 
Discussion with city and suburban youth will high- 
light the course. 
Myers M 2-5 Spring 

CTS CM 428 

Religious Education for Faith Development 

Is there an architecture of faith, a framework/map 
offering the traveler a universal faith pattern? Do 
we all, more or less uniquely, travel the same pat- 
tern? How does the church's educational plan help 
or hinder faith transmission? This course is a criti- 
cal consideration of the implications for religious 
education of Westerhoff and Fowler's work. 
Myers T 2-5 Sppring 

G-ETS 33-502 

Teaching for Biblical Faith 

An exploration of the nature of the Bible and its 
role in Christian education and the construction of 
faith. Particular attention to approaches to teach- 
ing the Bible as the church's book of faith and life. 
Limit: 40. 
SeymourlWogel TTh 9-10:50 Sfmng 

G-ETS 33-616 

The Aging in Church and Society 

An examination of attitudes toward aging and the 
old. Students are introduced to gerontology and 
then examine gifts and needs older adults bring to 
the church, evaluate resources, and develop models 
for ministries with, by, and for older adults. 
Vogel Th 1:30-4:30 Spring 

G-ETS 33-628 

Ethnicity and Cultural Pluralism in 

Christian Education 

An analysis of approaches to Christian education 
in culturally and ethnically diverse contexts. 
Attention to understanding cultural values and 
practices and to creating ministry and educational 
strategies for culturally specific, cross-cultural, and 
multi-cultural settings. Limit: 20. 
Seymour M 1 :30-4:30 Spring 

LSTC M-360A 

Educational Ministry: Teaching and Learning 

Students will study the theological and develop- 
mental foundations of Christian Education and put 
them into practice by teaching at four age levels 
using four different teaching-learning models. 
Conrad TTh 11-12:15 Spring 

LSTC M-360B 

Educational Ministry: Pastors as Teachers 

The class will develop models for the pastor as 



104 



Educational Ministry 



teacher in all aspects of parish life (classroom, 
home, worship, sacraments, administration, nur- 
ture, evangelism, stewardship, leadership develop- 
ment, etc.). Emphasis on the parish as an inten- 
tional learning community. Students will develop 
learning contracts based on their experience in 
educational ministry. 
Bozetnan TTh 11-12:15 Spring 

MTSA.STCM-452H 

Mision y Evangeiizacion en la Tarea Educativa de 
la Iglesia Hispana (Mission and Evangelization in 
the Education Task of The Hipsanic Church) 

El curso explorara varios modelos de mision y evan- 
geiizacion en la pastoral Hispana, estudiara la var- 
iedad de antropologias y teologias subyacentes en 
dichos modelos, promovera en el alumno la formu- 
lacion de una teoria o una practica de la mision de 
la iglesia Hispana en un context© urbano. 
De ]esus TBA Spring 

MTS M-414 

Nurturing a People: 

Baptism through Confirmation 

This course will examine ways that the church as 

the community of faith and parents can be partners 

in intentional planning for the growth in faith of 

all its children — from Baptism through 

Confirmation/Commissioning. 

CaldweU W 1-3:50 Spring 

M/LM321 

The Minister as Teacher 

What is the interaction between religion and edu- 
cation in the church? What is the minister's role? 
In what ways can the minister facilitate spiritual 
growth? The course will stress human and faith 
development as important knowledge for the min- 
ister as teacher. This course rests on the premise 
that all ministers are teachers. 
Gooding TBA Spring 

NPTSMNST-137 

Building Christian Community Through 

Small Groups 

A study of small group theory, theology and prac- 
tice through participation in a small group with 
both personal growth and task orientations. 
Applications are made to Bible study groups and to 
church boards and committees. 
D.Nelson Tfi 2-5 Spring 

NPTS MNST-230 

Leadership for Educational Ministry 

The course is an examination of the nature of lead- 



ership as a professional in the church and in equip- 
ping of laity for leadership responsibilities. 
F. Anderson MWTh (F) 1 1 :45 42:55 Spring 

NPTSMNST-231 
Confirmatim 

Historical and theological perspectives of confirma- 
tion are examined through this study; purpose, con- 
tent and organizational structure of the confirma- 
tion course; the teaching- learning process; a variety 
of teaching models; and the confirmation service. 
F. Anaerson W 2-5 Spring 



NBTSED414 
Teaching Preschoolers 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Morris/TBA TBA 



NBTSED415 

Research on the Young Child 

(For course description, see F^U.) 
Morris/TBA TBA 



Spring 



Spring 



NBTS ED 501 

Seminar in Theology and Christian Education 

This seminar is a discussion of major theological 
movements and philosophical perspectives which 
have shaped leading religious educators since 1950. 
Each student will present a paper integrating a the- 
ological or philosophical perspective with the edu- 
cational theory of a religious educator, in order to 
develop an individual theology which informs the 
practice of Christian education. Prereq: at least two 
of TH 301-3 and major course work in the 
Christian education specialization. 
Jenkins T 2-4:40 Spring 

NBTS ED 502 

Design and Writing of Curriculum for 

Christian Education 

The class will focus on principles of curriculum 
design and on sensitivities necessary for writing for 
a diverse audience. Various curricular resources will 
be analyzed. Individually or with partners, students 
will do exegetical work and write a unit of curricu- 
lum for the age level of their choice. Prereq: Six 
hours in C.E. and six hours in Biblical Studies. 
Morris TK 7-9 :40 p.m . Spring 

S-WTS 12-50 IS 
Educational Basics 

Provides a working knowledge of basic educational 
theory as it applies to religious education in a 
parish. Includes introduction to developmental 
theories as applied to education, educational 




105 



Polity and Canon Law 

opportunities at times of transition with the life of 
the congregation, the catechumenate as an oppor- 
tunity for significant adult education, and prepar- 
ing others to teach. 
Ross TTh 3-4:50 Spring 



VII. POLITY AND 
CANON LAW 

CTU M 421 
Church and Structure 

An introductory course in canon law, briefly treat- 
ing the nature, role and history of canon law; 
Church structures; the Eastern rites; ministries and 
holy orders; clerical discipline; the teaching office; 
acts of divine worship other than sacraments; 
sacred places and times; and general norms. 
Hueh UW 11:3042:45 Spring 



CTU M 422 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey and practical application of the canon 
law regulating baptism, confirmation, eucharist, 
penance, anointing of the sick, and marriage. 
Hueh TTh 1041:15 Spring 

CTS CH 367 

History and Polity of the United Church 

of Christ 

(For course description, see Historical Studies II.) 
Smith et d Th 6:30-9:30 P.M. Spring 

G-ETS 40-673 

United Methodist Studies 111: 

Twentieth Century 

(For course description, see Historical Studies II.) 
KeUerfTroxell Th 1 :30A:20 Spring 



106 



SPECIAL AREAS OF INTEREST 
WITHIN COURSES OF STUDY 

In this section abbreviated listings are given for courses in five special areas of 
interest in the theological curriculum. Full course descriptions are given in the section 
of course listings as specified. 



CTU M 432 
CTU T 443 
CTU W 460 
LSTCT-310 
MTS/LSTCT'311H 
MTS/LSTCM-419H 
NPTSTHEO-124 
NBTSBL301H 
NETS TH 301H 
NETS TH 304H 
NETS TH 440H 
NETS ED 302H 



CTU M 438 
MTS/LSTCH-417 
MTS/LSTC M-322H 
MTSE-320 
NETS OT 453H 
NETS EL 302H 
NETS TH 302H 
NETS TH 425H 
NETS RS 405H 
NETS PC 405H 



CTU M 419 
CTU E 570 
CTU T 555 
LSTCE-313H 
LSTCE-481H 
LSTC M-482 
LSTC/MTS T-459H 
MTSA.STCM.451H 
MTS/LSTC M-452H 
NETS EL 303H 
NETS NT 404H 
NETS NT 450H 
NETS TH 303H 
NETSME301H 



HISPANIC STUDIES 
FALL 

Hispanics in the U.S.: An Introduction 

Guadalupe: Expression of Hispanic Spirituality 

Cross-Cultural Ministry in North America 

Theology in Multicultural Perspective 

Orientacion a la Investigacion Bibliografica Teologica 

Del Texto a I Sermon 

Liberation Theology and Ethics 

Hebreo I 

Teologia Cristiana 1: Una Perspectiva. . . 

Teologia de las Comunicaciones 

Educacion y Teologia: Una Perspectiva Tercermundista 

El Ministerio Educativo de las Iglesias Hispanas 

WINTER 

Hispanic Faith and Culture 

Latin American and Caribbean Church History 

Introduccion al Consejo Pastoral. . . 

Liberation Ethics 

El Movimiento Profetico en Israel 

Hebreo II 

Teologia Cristiana II: Una Perpsectiva Praxeologica 

Documentos Teologicos 

Presencia Cristiana en America Latina Hoy 

Amor y Sexualidad Humana 

SPRING 

A Decade of History of Hispanics in the U.S.A. Church 

Revolution/Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 

Liturgy in a Multi-cultural Community 

Los Profetas de Israel 

El Evangclio de San Juan 

Ethnic Church Music 

Temas Principales de la Teologia Hispano-americana 

Seminar io de Pastoral Hispano 

Mision y Evangelizaction en la Tarea Educativa. . . 

Hebreo III 

El Evangelio de Juan 

El Nuevo Testamento: Una Lectura Tercermundista 

Teologia Cristiana III: Lecturas Contemporaneas 

Hacia una Teologia Hispana de la Evangelizacion 



Ministry Studies 1 
Mirustry Studies U 
Ministry Studies III 
Theological Studies I 
Theological Studies I 
Mirustry Studies V 
Ethical Studies II 
Old Testament IV 
Theological Studies I 
Theological Studies III 
Theolo^cal Studies III 
Mirustry Studies VI 



ReUgjion & Society Studies 
Historical Studies II 
Ministry Studies III 
Ethical Studies II 
Old Testament III 
Old Testament IV 
Theological Studies I 
Theolo^cal Studies III 
Religion & Society Studies 
Mim5tT7 Studies III 



Historical Studies IV 
Ethical Studies U 
Ministry Studies IV 
Old Testament I 
New Tesatment II 
Ministry Studies IV 
Theological Studies II 
Ministry Studies I 
Ministry Studies VI 
Old Testament IV 
New Testament II 
New Testament III 
Theological Studies I 
World Mission Studies 



107 



KOREAN STUDIES 
FALL 

MTS B'300K Introduction to Biblical Studies 

MTS H-3 16K The History of the Korean Church from 1884-1989 

MTS T'300K Introduction to Christian Theology 



Biblical Studies General 
Historical Studies U 
Theolo^cal Studies 1 



WINTER 
MTS B-408K The Epistles of Paul 

MTS B'324K Introduction to New Testament Greek I 

MTS M'345K The Pietistic Movement in the Korean Church 

MTS M-334K Pastoral Care of Three Generations 



New Testament U 
New Testament IV 
Ministry Studies I 
Ministry Studies III 



MTSB-325K 
MTS M.332K 



SPRING 

Introduction to New Testament Greek II New Testament IV 

Preaching and Worship in the Korean-American Church Ministry Studies V 



BLACK STUDIES 
FALL 

CTU W 427 African Religion and Western Christianity 

CTU W 460 Cross-Culcural Ministry in North America 

CTS TEC 458 The Black Church as Agent of Social Transformation 

G-ETS 13-640 Black Church: Journey of Faith and Freedom 

G-ETS 3 1-633 Preaching from the Black Experience 

LSTC T-310 Theology in Multicultural Perspective 

LSTC T-430 Black Theology and the Black Church 

NPTS HIST-255 Black Religious Experience in America 

NPTS THEO-1 24 Liberation Theology and Ethics 

NBTS TH 431 Hermeneutics and Liberation Theology 

SCUPE M 301 The Black Church in the Urban Setting 



World Mission Studies 
Ministry Studies III 
ReUgion 6? Society Studies 
Historical Studies IV 
Ministry Studies V 
Theolo^cal Studies I 
Thedo^cal Studies III 
Historical Studies II 
Ethical Studies II 
Theolo^cal Studies III 
Ministry Studies I 



CTU T 576 
CTS CM 306 
CTS TEC 405 
CTS CH 382/ 
MTS H 330 
G-ETS 22-611 



CTU W 547 
CTU T 575 
CTU T 555 
CTS TEC 497 
CTS CM 462 
G-ETS 21-635 
LSTC T-434 
LSTC M-482 
MTS M-328 
NBTS TH 431 



WINTER 

Black Theology 

African/American Perspectives on Pastoral Care 

Afro/American Intellectual History 

The History of the Black Church in North America 
Ethics of M.L. King, Jr. and Reinhold Niebuhr 

SPRING 

Power, Dreams, Ancestors and Healing in Africa 

Black Spirituality 

Liturgy in a Multi-Cultural Community 

Perspectives on Racism and Sexism 

Pastoral Ministry with Black Families 

African Theology: Tradition and Liberation 

TTieology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Ethnic Church Music 

Preaching in the Black Church 

Hermeneutics and Liberation Theology 



Theological Studies II 
Ministry Studies II 
Theolo^cal Studies III 

Historical Studies IV 
Ethical Studies I 



World Mission Studies 
MinistT7 Studies II 
Ministry Studies IV 
Theological Studies III 
Ministry Studies I 
Theolo^cal Studies II 
Theological Studies II 
Ministry Studies IV 
Ministry Studies V 
Theolo^cal Studies III 



108 



JUDAIC STUDIES 
FALL 

CTU B 520 Liturgy of the Synagogue I New Testament 111 

CTU B 525 Texts and Texture of Jesus' Jewish Background New Testament 111 

CTU T 543 Christology in the Light of Jewish/Christian Dialogue Theolo^cai Studies III 

CTS CH 601 Readings in Mishna Texts Old Testament III 

G'ETS 21'644 The Liturgy of the Synagogue Theoio^cal Studies II 

LSTCT-453 Current Issues in Jewish-Christian Dialogue Theolopccd Studies III 



CTU B 521 
CTU B 529 



WINTER 

Liturgy of the Synagogue II 
Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 



New Testament 111 
Ministry Studies II 



CTS CH 308 
G-ETS 21-643 
LSTCM.421 



SPRING 

Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought 
Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought 
Jewish Perspectives on Ministry 



Old Testament III 
Thedo^cal Studies II 
Ministry Studies I 
For a listing of courses in Judaica at Spertus College of Judaica, contact the Registrar, SCJ (p. 20). 



I 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 
FALL 

BTS M-335 Pastoral Care of Women Ministry Studies III 

CTU B 575 Feminist Interpretation of the Old Testament Old Testament III 

CTS CM 560 Readings in Feminist Psychology Ministry Studies III 

LSTC H-4 19 Women Leaders in the Early and Medieval Church Historical Studies V 

LSTC T-310 Theology in Multicultural Perspective Theolo^cal Studies I 

MTS T-433 Feminist Theology TKeobgicoI Studies II 

MS H 407 Readings in Feminist Theology Historical Studies V 

NPTS THEO'124 Liberation Theologry and Ethics Ethical Studies II 

TEDS NT 631 Women and the Church Ministry Studies I 



WINTER 

BTS M-440 Human Sexuality 

CTU 1 574 Feminist Hermeneutics and Worship 

CTS TEC 496 Seminar on Violence 

G-ETS 32-602 Gender Issues in Pastoral Care 

LSTC T-549 Sexuality and the Church 

LSTC M-477 Feminist Dimensions in Theological Education 

MA- M 360 Issues in Feminist Studies 

S-WTS 08-6 12S Ethics and Human Sexuality 

S-WTS 13-608 Women in Ministry 



Ministry Studies III 
Ministry Studies IV 
Theolo^cal Studies III 
Ministry Studies III 
Theological Studies III 
Ministry Studies VI 
Theolo^cal Studies III 
Ethical Studies I 
Ministry Studies I 



SPRING 

BTS B-433 Feminism and Biblical Theology 
CCPM/CTS TEC 

MTS E 435 Seminar on Feminist Theological Ethics 

CTU H 49 IB Women Mystics. . . 

CTS TEC 497 Perspectives on Racism and Sexism 

G-ETS 13/22-621 Church, Family and Gender Roles in Christianity 

MTS M-443 Issues of Human Development in the Church 

NBTS TH 43 1 Hermeneutics and Liberation Theology 

NETS PC 404 Pastoral Care of Women 

NBTS PC 405 Human Sexuality in the Context of Pastoral Care 



Biblical Studies General 

Ethical Studies II 
Ministry Studies II 
Theological Studies III 
Historical Studies V 
Ministry Studies III 
Theological Studies III 
Ministry Studies III 
Ministry Studies III 



109 



ACTS PERSONNEL 

FACULTY AND EXECUTIVE OFnCERS 



John R. Albright (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
Religion and Science 

A.B., Susquehanna University; M.S., Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin. 

James M. Alsdurf (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Kansas State Univerity; M.A., Western 
Kentucky University; M.A.T.S. Fuller 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Graduate School 
of Psychology, Fuller Theological Seminary. 

Frances M. Anderson (NPTS) Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.S.N., University of Nebraska; B.R.E., North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.A., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett- 
Evangelical Seminary and Northwestern 
University. 

Herbert Anderson (CTU) Professor of Pastoral 
Care 

B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; B.D., 
Augustana Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University. 

Philip J. Anderson (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Phil., Regent's Park 
College, University of Oxford. 

Gleason L. Archer, Jr. (TEDS) Professor of Old 
Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University; LL. B., 
Suffolk University; B.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Ruben Armendariz (MTS) Vice-President for 
Seminary Operations and Relations and Professor 
of Ministry 

B.A., University of Texas; B.D., Austin 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Study: 
Presbyterian Institute of Industrial Relations. 

James Barbour Ashbrook (G-ETS) Professor of 
ReUg}on and Personality 

A.B., Denison University; B.D., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio 
State University; LL.D., Denison University. 



Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (MTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Princeton University; M.Th., D.Min., 
University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Doy S. Athnos (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of Speech 
B.A., North Texas University; M.A., North- 
western University. 

Richard E. Augspurger (NPTS) Adjunct Professor 
of Pastoral Care 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

David Aune (CTS) Adjunct Professor in New 
Testament 

A.B., M.A., Wheaton College; M.A., 
University of Minnesota; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago; Fulbright Senior Lecturer, Trondheim 
University. 

Raymond J. Bakke (NBTS) Affiliate Professor of 
Ministry; (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Seattle Pacific 
College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; S.T.M., D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

Mark P. Bangert (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Seminex 
Professor of Warship and Music 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Study: Indiana 
University; Northwestern University; St. John's 
University. 

Deirdre M. Banks (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Christian Education 

R.N., Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, 
Australia; Dip. Theo., Melbourne Bible 
Institute; N.A., College of Nursing, Melbourne; 
L.Th., College of Divinity, Melbourne; 
M.A.Ed., Simpson College. 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) Professor of World 
Mission and Associate Director, World Mission 
Program 
S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; 



10 



S.T.D., Garretc-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

Paula S. Datsko Barker (S-WTS) Instructor in 
Historical Theobgy 

B.Mus., University of Michigan; M.Div., Yale 
University; Ph.D. cand., University of Chicago. 

Dorothy C. Bass (CTS) Associate Professor of 
Church History; Exchange Professor with MTS 
B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Union 
Theological Seminary and Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Brown University. 

Barry J. Beitzel (TEDS) Professor of Old Testament 
and Semitic Languages; Associate Academic Dean 
B.A., M.A., Bob Jones University; Ph.D., The 
Dropsie University. 

August J. Belauskas (MS) Director of Pre -Theology 
Program; Instructor, Department of Pre - 
Theology; Associcue Dean cf Formation 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A., Ph.D. cand., Loyola University, Chicago. 

Linda L Belleville (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
BibUcal Literature 

B.M., University of Rochester, Eastman School 
of Music; M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; Ph.D., University of St. Michael's 
College. 

Warren S. Benson (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Vice President of Academic 
Administration 

B.A., Northwestern College; Th.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.R.E., Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Loyola 
University, Chicago. 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies 

B.S., Marian College; M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis 
University. 

Howard A. Berman (LSTC) Jewish Chautauqua 
Society Visiting Lecturer in Mirustry 
B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.H.L., 
M.A.H.L., Hebrew Union College; Study: 
University of London; Hebrew University of 
Jerusalem; Leo Baeck College. 

Robert W. Bertram (LSTC) Christ Seminary - 
Seminex Professor of Historical and Systematic 
Theology 
B.A., Diploma in Theology, Concordia 



Seminary, Sl Louis; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago; Fulbright Scholar, University of 
Munich; Study: East Asia Pastoral Institute, 
Manila. 

Stephen Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
in Doctrinal Theology 

B.A.. Divine Word College; S.T.B., S.T.L., 
Pontifical Gregorian University; Ph.D., 
University of Notre Dame. 

Phyllis A. Bird (G-ETS) Associate Professor of Old 
Testament Interpretation 

A.B., University of California at Berkeley; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Th.D., 
Harvard Divinity School; Study: University of 
Heidelberg. 

Reidar B. Bjornard (NBTS) Professor of Old 
Testament, Emeritus 

Cand. Theol., University of Oslo; Th.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Study: 
Uppsala University; American School of 
Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

Deborah Block (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., Carroll College; M.Div., Louisville 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Richard A. Bodey (TEDS) Professor of Practical 
Theology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.Div., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Westminster 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Jeremiah M. Boland (MS) Director of Newly 
Ordained Program, Director Pastoral Internships , 
Asociate Dean of Formation 
S.T.B., M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of 
the Lake. 

Robert G. Boling (MTS) Dean of Master's Level 
Studies and Professor of Old Testament 
B.S., Indiana State College; M.Div., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University; Study: American 
School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

Barbara E. Bowe, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Manhattanville College; M.Ed., Boston 
College; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Harvard University. 



Ill 



Patrick J. Boyle, S.J. (MS) Msiitam Professor, 
Department cf Christian Ufe 
M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L, S.T.L., 
West Baden College; Ph.D., Marquette 
University. 

Jean Bozeman (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Educational Ministry 

A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; M.A., Temple 
University; M.A., University of Chicago; Study: 
Michigan State University, Millersville State 
College. 

Carl E. Braaten (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology 

A.B., St. Olaf College; B.Th., Luther 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard 
University; Fulbright Scholar, University of 
Paris (Sorbonne); Sinclair Kennedy Traveling 
Fellow, University of Heidelberg. 

Walter Brennan, O.S.M. (CTU) Lecturer in 
Theology 
M.A., Ph.D., DePaul University. 

Dale W. Brown (BTS) Professor of Christian 
Theolc^ 

B.A., McPherson College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Harold O. J. Brown (TEDS) Professor of Biblical 
arvi Systematic Theology, Franklin Forman Chair 
of Christian Ethics and Theology 
B.A., Harvard University; S.T.B., Th.M., 
Harvard Divinity School; Ph.D., Harvard 
University; Study: Marburg University. 

John M. Buchanan (MTS) Aijunct Lecturer in 
Preaching 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; B.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary and University 
of Chicago Divinity School; D.D., Muskingum 
College. 

Michael A. BuUmore (TEDS) Visiting Instructor of 
Practical Theohgy 

Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Wheaton 
College; M.Div., Th.M., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; Study: Northwestern 
University. 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe (M/L) Professor Emeritus of 
Theology and Science 
ScD., Meadville/Lombard Theological School. 



John E. Burkhart (MTS) Professor cf Theology 

B.A., D.D., Occidental College; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California; Study: 
University College, London. 

Richard P. Busse (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., Valparaiso University; M.T.S., Th.M., 
Th.D., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

George F. Cairns, Jr. (CCPM) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 
University; M.Div. cand., Chicago Theological 
Seminary. 

Alva R. Caldwell (G-ETS) Lhrarian for Program 
and Planning, The United Library, G-ETS/S- 
WTS 

B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Elizabeth F. Caldwell (MTS) Assodau Professor of 
Educational Ministry 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis; M.Ed., 
Vanderbilt University; Ph.D. cand., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary and 
Northwestern University; Study: Presbyterian 
School of Christian Education; University of 
North Alabama. 

Louis J. Cameli (MS) Ecclesiastical Dean and 
Professor , Department of Christian Life 
S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 

Edward F. Campbell (MTS) Francis A. McGaw 
Professor of Old Testament 

B.A., Yale University; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

John F. Canary (MS) Vice Rectorr 

M.A.S., University of San Francisco; S.T.L., 
D.Min., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Linda M. Cannell (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.R.E., Central Baptist Seminary; B.A., 
University of Manitoba; M.R.E., Ed.D., 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Kadileen Cannon, O.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Preaching 
M.A., Providence College; D.Min., Catholic 



12 



I 



University, Washington. 

Richard W. Carlson (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Ministries and Director of Field Education 
B.A., North Park College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary, 

William D. Carroll (MS) Adjunct Instructor, 
Departments of Bible and Systematic Theology 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.D. cand.. 
The Angelicam, Rome. 

Donald A. Carson (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.S., McGill University; M.Div., Central 
Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Cambridge University. 

Anna Case-Winters (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Theology and Church and Associate Dean of 
Doctoral Studies for Thesis Development 
B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.Div., Columbia 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 
University. 

J. Walter Cason (G-ETS) Mrs. E. M. Spreng 
Professor of Christian Missions 
B.Sc, Rice University; B.D., Perkins School of 
Theology; M.A., Southern Methodist 
University; Ph.D., Columbia University and 
Union Theological Seminary. 

Ian M. Chapman (NBTS) President and Professor 
of Preaching 

B.A., University of Hawaii; B.D., Eastern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Study: 
University of California, Santa Barbara; 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Donald Franklin Chatfield (G-ETS) Professor of 
PreacJung and Worship 

A.B., Yale University; B.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Edinburgh. 

Marge Chesney (SCUPE) Director of Marketing 

and Development 

B. A., Michigan State University. 

Andriy Freishyn-Chirovsky (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Church History and Eastern Christian 
Theology 
Ph.B., Pontifical Urban University, Rome; 



M.A., University of St. Michael's College, 
Toronto; S.T.D. cand.. University of Saint Mary 
of the Lake; Study: University of Notre Dame. 

David Claerbaut (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 
Ph.D., Loyola University. 

Robert E. Coleman (TEDS) Professor of 
Evangelism and Director of the School of World 
Mission and Evangelism 

B.A., Southwestern University; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Iowa. 

Robert L. Conrad (LSTC) Christ Seminary - 
Seminex Professor of EducatioT\al Ministry; 
Director, Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. 
Louis; M.A. in Education, Washington 
University; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Charles H. Cosgrove (NBTS) Associate Professor 

of New Testament 

B.A., Bethel College; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of 
Tubingen; ISEDET, Buenos Aires. 

Robert H. Craig (MTS) Associau Professor of 
Mirustry and Associate Dean of Doctoral Studies 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.Div., 
S.T.M., D.Min., McCormick Theological 

Seminary. 

Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M. (MS) Professor, 
Department of Church History 
M.A., Marquette University; S.T.D., Facultes 
Catholiques, Lyon, France. 

Charles S. Dake (TEDS) Dean of Students 

B.A., Trinity College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

David D. Daniels HI (MTS) Instructor in Church 
History; Exchange Professor with CTS 
B.A., Bowdoin College; M.Div., Yale University 
Divnity School; Ph.D. cand.. Union 
Theological Seminary. 

Frederick W. Danker (LSTC) Christ Semiruiry - 
Seminex Professor of New Testament, Emeritus 
B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 



113 



Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study: 
Washington University. 

William J. Danker (LSTC) Christ Seminary - 
Semir\ex Professor of Missions, Emeritus; (NPTS) 
Adjimct Professor 

Diploma, Concordia College, Milwaukee; 
Diploma, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., 
Wheaton College; D.Theol., University of 
Heidelberg; Study: University of Chicago. 

Donald W. Dayton (NBTS) Professor of Theobgy 
and Ethics; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., Houghton College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.S. in L.S., University of Kentucky; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study: Columbia 
University; Union Theological Seminary, New 
York; American Institute of Holy Land Studies; 
Asbury Theological Seminary; University of 
Tubingen. 

Jose Abraham De Jesus (LSTC/MTS) Adjunct 
Lecturer in Ministry 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.Th., 
Evangelical Seminary of Puerto Rico; D.Min., 
Andover Newton Theological Seminary. 

David E. Dillon (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Judson 
College; B.A., Aurora College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
Northern Illinois University. 

John V. Dolciamore (MS) lr\structor, Department 
of Christian L^e 

M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; J.C.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome. 

Perry G. Downs (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Education; (NPTS) Adjunct Professor 
of Christian Education 

Dip., Miami Christian College; B.S., 
Philadelphia College of Bible; M.A., Ph.D., 
New York University. 

Carl S. Dudley (MTS) Research Professor for 
1 989-90 and Professcrr of Church and Community 
B.A., Cornell University; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Study: New York School 
of Social Work; Washington University; 
Industrial Areas Foundation. 

Donald E Dumbau^ (BTS) Professor cf Church 
History 
B.A., Manchester College; M.A., University of 



Michigan; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Michael Eric Dyson (CTS) Instructor in Ethics and 
Cultural Criticism 

B.A., Carson-Newman College; Ph.D. cand., 
Princeton University. 

A. Royce Eckhardt (NPTS) Lecturer in Hymnology 
B.M., North Park College; M.M., University of 
Hartford. 

W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) Director of Field 
Education and Assistant Professor ofMirustry 
A.B., Johns Hopkins Univerity; M.Div., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 

O. C. Edwards, Jr. (S-WTS) Prof essor of Preaching 
B.A., Centenary College of Louisiana; S.T.B., 
The General Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Southern Methodist University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; D.D., Nashotah House. 

J. Ronald &igel (M/L) Professor of Social Ethics 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; B.D., 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Toinette M, Eugene (CTS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology and Culture 
B.A., University of San Francisco; M.A., Jesuit 
School of Theology, Berkeley, & Graduate 
Theological Union; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union. 

Nancy R. Eaus (BTS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology and Worship, Campus Minister 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., 
Columbia University; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Kevin J. Eeeney (MS) Director of Spiritual L^e 

M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
M.A.S., University of San Francisco. 

John S. Feinberg (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Bihlicai and Systematic Theology 
B.A., University of California; M.Div., Talbot 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Paul D. Feinberg (TEDS) Professor of BibUcal and 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; 
B.D., Th.M., Talbot Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Dallas Theological Seminary; M.A., 



114 



Roosevelt University; Ph.D. cand., University of 
Chicago. 

Carroll M. Felton, Jr. (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Knoxville College; M.Div., Interdenomin- 
ational Theological Center; D.Min., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School. 

Bruce L. Fields (TEDS) Instructor of BMcd and 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.Div., 
Th.M., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; 
Ph.D. cand., Marquette University. 

Brian J. Fischer (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Systematic Theology 

M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
S.L.D. cand., University of S. Anselmo, Rome. 

John Hall Fish (CCPM) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Princeton Univeristy; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago Divinity School. 

Neal F. Fisher (G-ETS) Presideru, and Professor of 
Theology and Society 

A.B., De Pauw University; M.Div., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D., Boston 
University Graduate School; Litt.D., De Pauw 
University. 

Geraldine A. Flynn (MS) Director of Field 
Education 

M.A., Loyola University; D.Min., University of 
Sl Mary of the Lake. 

Edward Foley, O.F.M. Cap. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Liturgy and Music 
B.A., St. Joseph's College; M.Div., St. Francis 
Seminary; M.Mus., University of Wisconsin; 
M.A,, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

Archimedes Fomasari, M.C.C.J. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Ethics 

B.A., M.A., Xavier University; Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America. 

Gerald E. Forshey (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

A.B., University of California; M.Th., lliff 
School of Theology; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Mark Francis, C.S.V. (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Liturgy 
M.Div., M.A., Catholic Theological Union; 



S.L.L., S.L.D., Sant' Anselmo University, 
Rome. 

David J. Frenchak (SCUPE) Executive Director 
B.A., Toccoa Falls Bible College; D.Min., 
Andover-Newton Theological School. 

Wesley J. Fuerst (LSTC) Professor of Old 
Testament 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., 
Central Lutheran Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; D.D., Midland 
Lutheran College; Study: University of 
Erlangen. 

Dorothy Jean Furnish (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Cornell College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Northwestern University (Joint Program with 
Garrett Theological Seminary). 

Richard B. Gardner (BTS) AssisioM Professor of 
New Testament Studies 

B.A., Juniata College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; D.Theol., University of 
Wiirzburg. 

Peggy L. T. Garrison (BTS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Care and Counseling 
B.A., Miami University, Ohio; M.Div., United 
Theological Seminary; M.S., Wright State 
University; Ph.D. cand., Garrett- 
Evangelical/Northwestem University. 

Victoria L. Garvey, R.S.M, (S-WTS) Instructor of 
Old Testament and Biblical Languages 
B.A., Mount Saint Agnes College; M.L.A., The 
Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Ph.D. 
cand.,Vanderbilt University. 

Neil W. Gerdes (M/L) and (CIS) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor c^ Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; 
M.A.L.S., UniversiD/ of Chicago. 

Thomas L. Gilbert (LSTC) Associau Director, 
Chicago Center for Rel^ion and Scier\ce; Adjur\ct 
Professor of Reli^on and Scieru:e Studies 
B.S., M.S., California Institute of Technology; 
Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology. 

Langdon Gilkey (LSTC) Adjunct Professor of 
Theology 
B.A., Harvard College; M.A., Union 



115 



Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 
University. 



Columbia 



Doug Gills (CCPM) Adjunct Faculty 

M.B.A., North Carolina Central University; 
Ph.D. cand., Northwestern University. 

Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Associate 
Professor cf Mission Theology 
M.A. (Anthropology), M.A. (Linguistics), 
Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 

Bonganjalo Goba (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Theology and Ethics 

B.A., South African Federal Theological 
Seminary; M.A., University of Chicago; M.Th., 
Th.D., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

John Charles Godbey (M/L) Professor of Churc h 
History 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Federated Theological Faculty, University of 
Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study: Polish Academy of Sciences. 

Norma S. Goertzen (NPTS) Assistant Professor of 
Theological Bibliography and Seminary Librarian 
B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated 
Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory 
University. 

Louis Goldberg (TEDS) Visiting Professor of Jewish 
Studies 

B.E., University of Southern California; B.D., 
Th.M., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Grace Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Roosevelt University; Study: Hebrew 
University, Israel. 

Margaret K. Gooding (M/L) Visiting Lecturer in 
Reli^ous Education 
B.S. Ed., Wheelock College. 

Stephen Ray Graham (NPTS) Aissistani Professor 
of American Church History 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton 
Graduate School; Ph.D., The University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 

Wayne Greenawalt (NBTS) Adjunct Clinical 
Instructor in Urban Pastoral Education 
A.B., Wheaton College; M.Div., Gordon- 
Conwell TTieological Seminary. 



Katherine B. Griffis (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching 

A.B., Harvard University; M.Div., Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Warren F. Groff (BTS) President Emeritus 

B.A., Juniata College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Dennis E. Groh (G-ETS) Professor of the History of 
Christianity (Patristics) 

B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Garrett Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Wayne A. Grudem (TEDS) Aissociate Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., Harvard University; M.Div., Westminster 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Cambridge. 

Heidi Hadsell (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Ethics 

B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., 
Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Southern California, Los Angeles. 

Byron L. Haines (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in World 
Mission 

B.A., Hanover College; M.S., University of 
Illinois; B.D., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; Th.D., Harvard University. 

Stanley Hallett (SCUPE) Adjuna Faculty Member 
B.A., Dakota Wesleyan College; S.T.D., Ph.D., 
Boston University. 

Edwin A. Hallsten, Jr. (NPTS) Associate Professor 
of Pastoral Care and Counseling 
B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; B.D., North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Illinois. 

Hugh F. Halverstadt (MTS) Associate Professor of 

Mirustry 

B.A., King College; B.D., Union Tlieological 

Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., Northwestern 

University. 

Adolf M. Hansen (G-ETS) Vice President for 
Admirustration and Part-time Associate Professor 
of New Testament 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B. and S.T.M., New 
York Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University (Joint program with 
Garrett Theological Seminary). 



116 



I 



Calvin B. Hanson (TEDS) Director of Internship 
B.A., Augsburg College; M.A., University of 
Minnesota; Lict-D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School. 

James D. Hargleroad (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.S., University of Nebraska; Diploma, 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Murray J. Harris (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament Exegesis and Theology 
B.A., M.A., University of New Zealand; 
Dip.Th., University of London; Dip. Ed., 
University of Auckland; B.D., University of 
Otago; Ph.D., University of Manchester. 

Joseph C. Hassey (TEDS) Vice President of Student 
Affairs and Dean of Admissions 
B.A., Houghton College; M.Div., Conservative 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.M., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

William P. Haugaard (S-WTS) Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Diocese of Chicago 
Professor ofChmch History 
B.A., Princeton University; M.Div., Th.D., The 
General Theological Seminary. 

Zachary Hayes, O.RM. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Quincy College; Dr. Theol., Friederich- 
Wilhelm University; Bonn; Litt.D., St. 
Bonaventure University; Litt.D., Quincy 
College. 

Warren J. Heard, Jr. (TEDS) Visiting Instructor of 
Greek and Presbyterian Polity 
B.S., Southern Methodist University; Dip., 
Moody Bible Institute; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of Aberdeen. 

Philip J. Hefner (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology; Director, Chicago Center for Reli^on 
and Science 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; L.H.D., Midland 
Lutheran College; Fulbright Scholar at 
University of Tubingen. 

Kurt K. Hendel (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Seminex 
Assodate Professor of Reformation History 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., 



Ohio State University; Fulbright Scholar at 
University of Gottingen. 

Sarah Henrich (LSTC) Assistant Professor of New 
Testameru 

B.A., Muhlenberg College; M.A., Bryn Mawr 
College; M.Div., Lutheran Theological 
Seminary, Philadelphia; Ph.D. cand., Yale 
University. 

Carl F. H. Henry (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Biblical and Systematic Theology 
A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Th.D., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Boston 
University; Litt.D., Seattle Pacific College; 
Litt.D., Wheaton College; L.H.D., Houghton 
College, 

Nancy Hess (LSTC) Director of Pastoral Studies 
B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Luther 
Northwestern Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 
cand.. University of South Africa; Study: 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

David J. Hesselgrave (TEDS) Professor cf Mission 
Dip., Trinity Theological Seminary; B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Thomas E. Hickey (MS) Dean cfFormadon 

M.Div., D.Min. cand.. University of St. Mary of 
the Lake; M.Chr. Sp. cand., Creighton 
University. 

Earle Hilgert (MTS) Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Walla Walla College; B.D., Adventist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of 
Chicago; D.Theol., University of Basel. 

John E. Hinkle, Jr. (G-ETS) Professor of Pastoral 
Psychology and Counseling 

B.A., Taylor University; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
Northwestern University (Joint Program with 
Garrett Theological Seminary); Diplomate, 
American Association of Pastoral Counselors. 

J. Robert Hjelm (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Studies 

A.B., Momingside College; M.Div., Nordi Park 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Paul L. Holmer (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Theobgy 

B.A., M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., 
Yale University. 



117 



Fredrick Holmgren (NPTS) Professor of Biblical 
Literature 

A.B., Calvin College; B.D., S.T.M., Th.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 



Seminary; S.T.M., S.T.D., Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago; Th.D. honoris causa, St. 
Olaf College; Study: Doshisha University, 
Tokyo Union Theological Seminary, Harvard 
University. 



Raymond C. Holtz (MS) Associate Dean of 
Formation 
M.A., University of Detroit. 

Leslie J. Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Old Testament Studies 

B.A., St. Francis College; M.A., Aquinas 
Institute of Theology; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University and Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

David G. Homer (NPTS) President 

B.A., Barrington College; M.A., University of 
Rhode Island; M.B.A., Ph.D., Stanford 
University. 

Estella Boggs Homing (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Biblical Studies; (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Hebrew 

B.A., Manchester College; R.N., Presbyterian- 
St. Luke's Hospital; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Mark A. DeW. Howe (S-WTS) Director and 
Lecturer of Music 

B. Mus., Westminster Choir College; M. Mus., 
Yale University; Diploma in Anglican Studies, 
Berkeley Divinity School. 

John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of 
Church Law 

B.A., St. Louis University; M.A., M.Div., 
Catholic Theological Union; J.C.B., J.C.L., 
J.C.D., Catholic University of America. 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Liturgy 

B.A., Newton College; M.A., Catholic 
University of America; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Notre Dame. 

C. Michael Ideran (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Luther College; M.Div., Wartburg 
College; D.Min., Lutheran School of Theology 
at Chicago. 

Yoshiro Ishida (LSTC) Director, Center for Global 
Mission; Lecturer in World Mission 
M.Div. equiv., Japan Lutheran Theological 



Richard P. Issel (MS) Clinical Psycholo^t, Adjunct 
Professor, Department cf Ministry 
Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Willard F. Jabusch (MS) Prcfessor, Department of 
Ministry 

M.A., University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.A., 
Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Everett Jackson (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

B.S., Roosevelt University; M.Ed., Northern 
Illinois University; M.Div., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; CPE, Community 
Hospital of Evanston, St. Francis Hospital of 
Evanston; Study: Northern Illinois University. 

E, Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) Professor of Education 
and Ministry and Director of Doctoral Studies 
B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Northem Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago; Study: Harvard University; CPE, 
Presbyterian -St. Luke's Hospital, Chicago. 

Richard A. Jensen (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Preaching 

B.A., Dana College; M.Div., Wartburg 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Aquinas Institute. 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) Harry R. Kendall Professor 
of New Testament Interpretation 
B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary/University of 
Chicago; Dr. theol., University of Tubingen. 

Philip R. Johnson (LSTC) Lecturer in Pastoral 
Care and Counseling 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Luther 
Theological Seminary. 

Susan B. W. Johnson (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in Preaching 

A.B., Albright College; A.M.Div., University of 
Chicago Divinity School; Study: University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 



118 



I 



I 



Raymond Walter Johnston (NPTS) Adjunct 
Professor of Youth Ministry 

B.A., Azusa Pacific University; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Robert K. Johnston (NPTS) Dean of the Seminary, 
Professor ofTheobgy and Culture 
A.B., Stanford University; B.D., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary. 

William Johnstone (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

James W. Jones (NBTS) Affiliate Instructor in 
Theology 

B.A., Taylor University; M.A., Western 
Kentucky University; M.Div., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. 

Cynthia Jiirisson (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
American Church History 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Luther 
Northwestern Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 
cand., Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Emma J. Justes (NBTS) Professor of Pastoral Care 
arvi Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Franklin College, Indiana; B.D., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School; Th.M., Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Walter C. Kaiser, Jr. (TEDS) Professor of Old 
Testament and Semitic Languages; Academic 
Dean and Vice President of Education 
A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Wheaton 
Graduate School of Theology; M.A., Ph.D., 
Brandeis University. 

Howard Kang (MTS) Director of the Korean- 
American Ministries Center arvd Adjunct Lecturer 
inMinistry 

A.B., Soonjun University; B.D., Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, Seoul; S.T.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of 
Illinois at Chicago Circle; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 

Kenneth S. Kantzer (TEDS) Dean Emeritus, 
Director of the Doctor of Philosophy Program, and 
Distinguished Professor of Biblical and Systematic 
Theology 
A.B., Ashland College; A.M., Ohio State 



University; B.D., S.T.M., Faith Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

John M. Kaserow, M.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Mission Studies 

Ph.D., University of St. Michaels College, 
Toronto. 

Rosemary Skinner Keller (G-ETS) Professor of 
Religion and American Cultural Studies 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.R.E., Yale 
Divinity School; M.A., Chicago State 
University; Ph.D., University of Illinois at 
Chicago. 

Gerald E Kicanas (MS) Rector-Presideru 

M.A., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.Ed., Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago; 
Study: St. Louis University; Institutes in 
Bethlehem, Israel; LaJoUa, California; Lincoln, 
Nebraska. 

Dai Kyun Kim (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching and Worship 

B.Th., Th.M., Yonsei University; M.Div., 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Seoul; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Michael C. Kirwen, M.M. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Mission Studies 
Ph.D., University of St. Michael College, 
Toronto. 

Ralph W. Klein (LSTC) Christ Seminary'Seminex 
Professor of Old Testament; Dean 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; Th.D., Harvard 
University; Study: University of Michigan; 
University of Gottingen. 

Haddon Klingberg, Jr. (NPTS) Adjunct Professor 
of Pastoral Care 

B.A., Gordon College; B.D., Bethel Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Graduate School of 
Psychology, Fuller Theological Seminary; Study: 
Fairfield Hills Hospital; University of Vienna. 

Jane K. Koonce (NPTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Spiritual Direction 

B.A, Baylor University; M.A., Columbia 
University Teachers College; M.P.S., Loyola 
University; Study: St. George's College, 
Jerusalem; University of California, Berkeley. 



119 



Paul Koptak (NPTS) Adjunct Instructor of BibUccd 
Studies 

A.B., Rutgers University; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary and 
Northwestern University; Study: Regent 
College; Westminster Theological Seminary. 

Edgar M. Krentz (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Seminex 
Professor of New Testament 
B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St, Louis; 
M.A., Ph.D., Washington University; Study: 
University of Chicago; American School of 
Classical Studies, Athens; University of 
Tubingen. 

John R. Kretzmann (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer in 
Church and Society 

B.A., Princeton University; M.A., University of 
Virginia; Ph.D., Nordiwestem University. 

William J. Kuntze (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in United 
Methodist Studies 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater; 
M.Div., Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

Andre LaCocque (CTS) Professor of Old Testament 
and Director, Center fcyr Jewish-Christian Studies 
D.Litt., D.Theol., University of Strasbourg. 

William Lane (NPTS) Visiting Professor of New 
Testament 
Th.M., Th.D., Harvard Divinity School. 

David L. Larsen (TEDS) Professor of Practical 
Theology 

B.A., Stanford University; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Trinity College; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary. 



Spencer Lavan (M/L) Professor, History of Religions 
and Pastoral Care, Dean and C/iief Executive 
B.A., Tufts University; B.D., Harvard Divinity 
School; M.A., Ph.D., McGill University. 

Eugene A. LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of New Testament Studies; (MS) 
Visiting Professor, Department (^Sacred Scripture 
M.A., John Carroll University; S.T.L., 
University of Fribourg; S.S.L., Pontifical 
Biblical Institute; Eleve Titulaire, Ecole 
Biblique, Jerusalem; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Jong Min Lee (MTS) Adjimct Lecturer in Korean 
CfiurcK History 

Th.B., Th.M., Han Kuk Theological Seminary; 
M.Div., Winebrenner Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Leo D. Lefebure (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Systematics 

S.T.B., M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of 
the Lake; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Perry D. LeFevre (CTS) Professor of Theology 

B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

William E. Lesher (LSTC) President 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; D.D., 
California Lutheran University; D.D., Pacific 
Lutheran University; D.D., Wittenberg 
University. 

WUliam Leslie (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
B.A., Wheaton College; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 



Darryl Larson (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Church Growth 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; Study: Fuller 
Theological Seminary; University of the Pacific; 
Bethel Theological Seminary. 

Robert Larson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Pastoral Studies 

A.B., Lewis and Clark College; B.D., North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.U.P., Ph.D., 
University of Washington; Study: Garrett 
Theological Seminary. 



John R. Levison (NPTS) Adjuna Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Cambridge 
University; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Walter L. Liefeld (TEDS) Distinguished Professor of 
New Testament 

Th.B., Shelton College; A.M., Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Columbia University and 
Union Theological Seminary. 

David L. Lindberg (LSTC) Director of Field 
Education; Associate Professor of World Mission 
and World Reli^ons 
A.B, Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., 



120 



Augustana Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) Assodaie Professor of 
Doarmal Theology 

B.A., Georgetown University; S.T.B., M.A., 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Wilhelm C. Linss (LSTC) Professor of New 
Testameru 

B.D. (equiv.), University of Erlangen; Th.D., 
Boston University School of Theology; Study: 
University of Miinster; University of Michigan. 

Jerome E. Listecki (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department (^Christian Life. 
S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
J.C.L., J. CD., Pontifical University of St. 
Thomas Aquinas, Rome; J.D., DePaul 
University. 

Alfred Little (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in Black 
Church Studies 

B.S., LaSalle University; M.Div., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago; M.S., National 
College of Education. 

Lois Gehr Livezey (MTS) Dean of Doctoral Studies 
and Professor of Christian Ethics 
B.A., Smith College; M.A., Columbia 
University/Union Theological Seminary, New 
York; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John G. Lodge (MS) Assistant Professor, 
Department of Sacred Scripture 
M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.A., University of Illinois, Chicago; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome. 

Francis W. Lordemann (MS) Associate Dean of 
Forvnation 

B.A., Conception Seminary; M.S., Creighton 
University; Study: American College, Louvain, 
Belgium. 

John M. Lozano, C.M.R (CTU) Professor of 
Spiritual Theology 

B.A., Claretian College; S.T.L., Universite 
Catholique de I'Ouest, Angers; S.S.L., 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; S.T.D., 
University of St. Thomas, Rome. 

Isidro Lucas (CTU) Director of Research and 
Development of the Hispardc Ministry Program 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Madrid, Spain. 



Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) Aissistant Professor of 

Re^ous Education 

B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.A., 

Mundelein College. 

Milo D. Lundell (TEDS) Director of Placement and 
Field Education 

B.A., St. Paul Bible College; B.D., D.Min., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Dennis R. Magary (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., Fort Wayne Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D. cand.. 
University of Wisconsin. 

Carl Malin (LSTC) Lecturer in Pastoral Care and 
Counseling 

B.A., Upsala College; M.Div., Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago. 

Paul Manz (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Seminex 
Professor of Church Music and Artist in Residence 
B.S. in Ed., Concordia College, River Forest; 
M.M., Northwestern University; Fulbright 
Scholar, First Prize in Organ and Improvisation, 
Royal Flemish Conservatory at Antwerp, 
Belgium; Litt.D., Concordia College, Seward; 
D.Mus. (Hon.), Carthage College; L.H.D., 
Christ Seminary-Seminex. 

Claude F. Mariottini (NBTS) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament 

B.A., California Baptist College; M.Div., 
Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Study: Graduate Theological Union. 

Robert J. Marshall (LSTC) Senior Fellow, Center 
for Global Mission 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Div., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago; L.H.D., 
Gettysburg College; LL.D., Augustana College, 
Wagner College, Muhlenberg College, Upsala 
College; D.D., Northwestern Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, Waterloo University; 
Litt.D., Roanoke College, Newberry College; 
Study: University of Chicago. 

G. Al Masterson (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.S., University of Oregon; M.D., Loma Linda 
School of Medicine; Internship, St. 
Luke's/Denver General Hospital; Residency, 
Harvard University; Fellowship in Child 
Psychiatry, University of California at Los 
Angeles. 



121 



Fumitaka Matsuoka (BTS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Mission Studies ard Deojx 
B.S., McPherson College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary, Virginia. 

Melanie A. May (BTS) Adjuna Factiky in Theclogy 
B.A., Manchester College; M.Div., Harvard 
Divinity School; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University; Study: Graduate School of 
Ecumenical Studies, University of Geneva. 

Marie McCarthy, S.P. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Pastoral Care 

B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.M., 
Butler University; M.A., Catholic Theological 
Union; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Thomas E. McComiskey (TEDS) Professor of Old 
Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., The King's College; M.Div., Faith 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Westminster 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Brandeis 
University. 

Taylor McConnell (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
hiemher 

B.A., University of Denver; Th.M., Th.D., Iliff 
School of Theology; D.D., Westminster 
College. 



Scot McKnight (TEDS) Assistant Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., Grand Rapids Baptist College; M.A., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., 
University of Nottingham. 

Charles R. Meyer (MS) Professor, Departments of 
Systematic Theology and Church History 
M.A., S.TD,, University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; B.S. Library Science, Rosary College; 
Study: Vatican Library; Gregorian University, 
Rome. 

Kenneth M. Meyer (TEDS) PresjdeTU 

Dip., B.D., Trinity Theologial Seminary; 
D.Min., Luther Rice University. 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) Associate Professor of 
Biblical Theology 

B.A., Bridgewater College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Walter L. Michel (LSTC) Professor of Old 
Testament 

B.D.(equiv.), University of Vienna; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Study: 
University of Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Western Michigan 
University; Yale University; Pontifical Biblical 
Institute; Loyola University. 



Richard D. McCreary 11 (NBTS) Adjunct 
Professor of Preaching 

B.S., Rorida A &. M University; M.S., Southern 
Illinois University; Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Larry D. McCullough (TEDS) Vice President of 
Extension and Continuing Education 
B.A., Columbia Bible College; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; D.Min., Luther 
Rice Seminary. 

Carol Ann McGibbon (SCUPE) Program Dtector 
B.A., Acadia University; M.Div., Acadia 
Divinity College. 

Thomas McGonigle, O.R (CTU) Vice President 
and Dean and Associate Professor of Spirituality 
B.A., M.A., Aquinas Institute of Theology; 
Th.D., Harvard University. 

James P. Mcllhone (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Sacred Scripture 

S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the Lake; 
Ph.D., Marquette University. 



Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore (CTS) Assistant 
Professor of Religion, Personality and Culture 
B.A., Kalamazoo College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Leonel L. Mitchell (S-WTS) Registrar and 
Professor of Liturgies 

B.A., Trinity College; S.T.B., Berkeley Divinity 
School; S.T.M., Th.D., The General 
Theological Seminary. 

Margaret M. Mitchell (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Biblical Studies and Hebrew Bible 
B.A., Manhattanville College; M.A., Ph.D. 
cand.. University of Chicago; Study: Boston 
College. 

Douglas J. Moo (TEDS) Associate Professor of New 

Testament 

B.A., DePauw University; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of St. Andrews. 



122 



Robert L. Moore (CTS) Professor of Psychology and 
Religion 

B.A., Hendrix College; M.Th., Souchern 
Methodist University; M.Th., Duke University; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Diplomate 
Alfred Adler Institute of Chicago; Diplomate, 
CO. Jung Institute of Chicago. 

Robert Moosbrugger, O.M.I. (CTU) Lecturer in 
Spirituality; Acting Director ofM.Div. Program 
B. A., St. Paul Seminary; M.A.T., College of St. 
Thomas; M.Div., Weston School of TTieology; 
S.T.L., S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome. 

Wilda W. Morris (NETS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., The American University; A.M., Ph.D., 
The University of Illinois; M.A. in C.E., 
M.Div., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Osvaldo L. Mottesi (NBTS) Professor of Religion 
and Society and Director of Hispanic Studies 
B.S., Instituto Politecnico Otto Krause, Buenos 
Aires; L.Soc, Universidad Argentina de 
Ciencias Sociales; B. Teol., Seminario Biblio 
Latinoamericano, San Jose, Costa Rica; Th.M., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Emory 
University; Study: Seminario Internacional 
Teologico Bautista, Buenos Aires; Princeton 
University. 

Deborah F. Mullen (MTS) Associate Dean of 
Experiential Education at the Master's Level 
B.A., University of Rochester; M.Div., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School/Bexley Hall/Crozer 
Theologial Seminary. 

Larry G. Murphy (G-ETS) Professor of the History 
of Christianity 

B.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., 
Graduate Theological Union. 

William R. Myers (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education and Director of Field 
Education 

M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; 
M.Ed., Rhode Island College; Ed.D., Loyola 
University of Chicago. 

William R. Myers (NBTS) President Emeritus 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; D.D., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; L.D.H., Sioux 
Empire College; Ed.D. (Hon.), Judson College; 



Study: Union Theological Seminary; Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor 
of Ethics 

B.A., Quincy College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Peter T. Nash (G-ETS) Instructor of Old Testameru 
Iruerpretation 

A.B., Concordia Sr. College, Ft. Wayne; M.Div., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., 
University of Chicago. 

Arthur A. R. Nelson (NPTS) Dean of Student 
Development and Associate Professor of Applied 
Theology 

B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; D.D., North Park 
College and Theological Seminary; Study: 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Betty Nelson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., Augustana College; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Study: Northwestern University. 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

A.B., Brown University; B.D., Yale University 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University and Garrett Theological Seminary; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary; 
University of Chicago. 

William R. Nelson (NBTS) Professor of Ministry 
and Director of Field Education 
B.S., College of Charleston; B.D., Th.M., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Fulbright 
Scholar, University of Heidelberg. 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) Professor of 
Church History and Director of World Mission 
Program 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Techny; L.Miss., 
Gregorian University, Rome; M.A., Catholic 
University, Washington; Ph.D., Cambridge 
University. 

Harold A. Netland (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Mission 

B.A., Biola College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School. 



123 



Thomas J. Nettles (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., Mississippi College; M.Div., Ph.D., 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Clarence G. Newsome (NPTS) Visiting Professor 
ofMirdstry 
B.A., M.Div., Ph.D., Duke University. 



Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of Aberdeen. 

Carolyn A. Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Professor of 
New Testament Studies 

B.A., Fontbonne College, St. Louis; M.A.T., 
Manhattanville College; Th.D., Harvard 

University. 



Morris J. Niedenthal (LSTC) Professor of 
Preaching 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Fulbright Scholar at 
Manchester University. 

Edward O. V. Nyhus (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
Church History and Missions 
B.A., Augsburg College; B.Th., Augsburg 
Seminary; M.Th., Princeton Seminary; M.A., 
Ohio University; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin-Madison. 

John W. Nyquist (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Evangelism and Director of Summer Overseas 
Ministries 

B.A., M.A., California State University; M.A., 
M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

Eric H. Ohlmann (NBTS) Professor of Christian 
Heritage and Interim Dean 

B.A., University of Alberta; B.D., North 
American Baptist Seminary; Th.M., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.D., Graduate 
Theological Union; Study: Predigerseminar, 
Hamburg. 

Theodore M. Olsen (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology 

B.A., Rockford College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Study: University 
of Iowa. 

Karl A. Olsson (NPTS) President Emeritus 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Kenneth G'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Professor of 
Bibliography 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois; Study: University of 
Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint Louis 
University; Spalding College. 

Grant R. Gsborne (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament 
B.A., Fort Wayne Bible College; M.A., Trinity 



Gilbert Ostdiek, O.RM. (CTU) Professor of 
Liturgy 

S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum 
Antonianum, Rome; Study: Harvard 
University; University of California. 

C. David Owens (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Mirustry 

B.A., Covenant College; M.Div., Bangor 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Chang Hwan Park (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Biblical Studies 

B.A., Hong Ik University; Th.B., Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, Seoul; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Litt.D., Whitworth 
College. 

Eung-Chun Park (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Biblical Studies 

B.A,, Seoul National University; S.T.M., Yale 
University; Ph.D. cand.. University of Chicago. 

Thomas D. Parker (MTS) Professor of Theology 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; B.D., San 
Francisco Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Study: 
University of Munich. 

John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Ethics and Director ofM.A. Program 
A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Arthur R. Peacocke (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
Religion and Science 

B.A., B.Sc, M.A., Ph.D., D.D., Oxford 
University; ScD., Cambridge University. 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) Chautauqua 
Professor of Jewish Studies 

B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., 
Jewish Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L., 
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of 
Religion; D.D., Hebrew Union College, 
Cincinnati. 



124 



Albert P. Pero, Jr. (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Theology cand Cross -Cultural Studies 
A.B., M.A., University of Detroit; B.Th., 
Concordia Theological Seminary, Springfield, 
IL; S.T.D., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

James Persson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Ministry 

B.S., Mankato State University; M.Div., North 
Park Theological Seminary; D.Min., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Richard 1. Pervo (S-WTS) Associate Professor of 
New Testament and Patristics 
B.A., Concordia College; B.D., Episcopal 
Theological School; Th.D., Harvard University. 

Jamie Phelps, O.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor in 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S.W., 
University of Illinois; M.A., St. John's 
University; Ph.D. cand., Catholic University of 
America. 

Ricardo Pietrantonio (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
New Testament 

B.Th., Facultad Luterana de Teologia; STM, 
Yale University; TTi.D., Catholic University of 
Argentina. 

Ana Maria Pineda, S.M. (CTU) Instructor in 
Pastoral Theology and Director of Hispanic 
Ministry Program 

M.A., Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D. 
cand., Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca. 

George Polk (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in Pastoral 
Care and Counseling 

M.Div., Virginia Union University; S.T.M., 
New York Theological Seminary; Doctor of 
Sacred Literature, Christ Bible College, New 
York. 

John C. Polkinghome (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 

Reli^on and Science 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Sc.D., Cambridge 

University. 

Priscilla Pope-Levison (NPTS) Assistant Professor 
of Contextual Theology 

B.Mus., DePauw University; M.Div., Duke 
Divinity School; Ph.D., University of St. 
Andrews. 



Robert J. Price (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 

Mirusvry 

B.Ed., M.Ed., University of Illinois; M.A., 

Governors State University. 

David Ramage, Jr. (MTS) President of the Semir\ary 
and Professor of Ministry 

B.A., Hanover College; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Hanover College; 
D.D., Johnson C. Smith Theological Seminary; 
Study: University of Cincinnati; School of 
Social Work, University of Illinois. 

Lallene Rector (G-ETS) Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., Texas Christian University; M.TS., Ph.D., 
Boston University. 

Jerold R Reed (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Church Growth and Evangelism 
B.S., University of California, Davis; B.D., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Carol Sue Reese (NBTS) Adjunct Clinical 
lr\structor in Pastoral Care 

B.A., Georgetown College; M.Div., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; M.S.W., 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Gene Reeves (M/L) Professor of Theology 

A.B., University of New Hampshire; S.T.B., 
Boston University; Ph.D., Emory University. 

Barbara Reid, O.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
New Testament Studies 

M.A., Aquinas College; Ph.D., Catholic 
University of Washington. 

David M. Rhoads (LSTC) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A, Gettysburg College; M.A., Oxford 
University; B.D., Gettysburg Lutheran 
Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Don Carl Richter (BTS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education 

A.B., Davidson College; M.Div., Ph.D. cand., 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Jay C. Rochelle (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Worship and Dean of the Chapel 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; Th.M., 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; Study: 
Valparaiso University; Yale University. 



125 



Daniel R. Rodriquez-Dfaz (MTS/LSTC) Director 
of the Joint MTS/LSTC Hispanic Ministries 
Progrcan; (MTS) Professor of Church History 
B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.Div., 
Graduate School of Theology, Oberlin College; 
Ph.D., National University of Mexico. 

Jose David Rodriguez (LSTC/MTS) Associate 
Director, Joint MTS/LSTC Hispanic Ministries 
Program; (LSTC) Lecturer in Theology 
B.A, Universidad de Puerto Rico; M.Div., 
Th.M., Th.D., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

Edward Rommen (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Mission 

B.A., Nyack College; M.Div., D.Miss., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Th.D., University 
of Munich. 

Eugene E Roop (BTS) Wieand Professor of BibUcal 
Studies 

B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School. 

Paul Rorem (LSTC) Associate Professor of Ancient 
Church History 

B.A., St. Olaf College; B.D., Luther Theological 
Seminary; S.T.M., Lutheran Theological 
Seminary, Philadelphia; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Eloise Rosenblatt, R.S.M. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of New Testament Studies 
B.A., University of Santa Clara; M.A., 
University of Southern California; Ph.D., 
Graduate Theological Union; Study: Ecole 
Biblique, Jerusalem. 

Lilian R. Ross (S-WTS) Professor in Christian 
Mvnistries 
M.R.E., Loyola University. 



Tubingen, Heidelberg; Th.M., Th.D., Victoria 
University/Toronto School of Theology. 

Rosemary Radford Ruether (G-ETS) Georgia 
Harkness Professor cf Applied Theology 
BA., Scripps College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School; L.H.D., Denison University; 
Emmanuel College, Boston; Wittenberg 
University; Xavier University; Hamilton 
College; St. Olaf s College; Walsh College. 

John H. Sailhamer (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., University of California at Long Beach; 
Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California at Long Beach. 

Paul J. Satre (TEDS) Visitmg Professor in Church 
Music 

B.A., Trinity College; M.M., D.M.A., American 
Conservatory of Music. 

Herman E. Schaalmann (CTS) and (G-ETS) 
Adjunct Faculty Member 

B.A., M.A., University of Cincinnati; B.H.L., 
M.H.L., D.D., Hebrew Union College. 

James A. Scherer (LSTC) Professor of Missions and 
Church History 

A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Study: Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Columbia 
University; International Christian University, 
Japan; Oxford University. 

Daniel S. Schipani (LSTC/MTS) Adjunct Lecturer 
in Pastoral Care; (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Christian Education 

Lie. Psy., Universidad de Buenos Aires; Dr. Psy., 
Universidad Catolica Argentina; M.A.R., 
Goshen Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study: University of 
California at Los Angeles. 



Theodore C. Ross, S.J. (CTU) Lecturer in Church 
History; (MS) Instructor, Department of Churc h 
History 

Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden 
College; M.A., (History), M.A., (Theology), 
Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.L., Bellarmine 
School of Theology. 

Wolfgang Roth (G-ETS) Professor of Old 
Testament Interpretation and Director, Joint Ph.D. 
Program (with Northwestern University) 
cand. rev. min.. Universities of Marburg, 



Robert L. Schoenstene (MS) Instructor, 
Department of Sacred Scripture 
S.S.L., Pontifical College Josephinum. 

David M. Scholer (NPTS) Distinguished Professor 
of New Testament and Early Church History ; 
(NBTS) Adjunct Professor of New Testamervt. 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton 
College Graduate School; B.D., Gordon 
Divinity School; Th.D., Harvard Divinity 
School. 



126 



Jeannette F. Scholer (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Communicaikms 

A.B., Wheaton College; A.M., Harvard 
University; Study: Uriiversity of Bridgeport. 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.PRS. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Dr., University of 
Nijmegen; Study: Oxford University. 

Richard E Schroeder (MS) Director of Finances 
S.T.B., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) Professor of Religion 
and Society 

B.A., Bethel College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; B.D., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Wanda J. Moody Scoble (NBTS) Adjunct 
Instructor in Christian Education 
B.A., Ottawa University; M.A. (C.E.), 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Martha Scott (G-ETS) and (SCUPE) Adjunct 
Faculty Member 

B.A., Governors State University; M.Div., 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University (Joint Program 
with Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary). 

William L. Secor, Jr. (TEDS) Associate Professor of 

Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 

B.Th., Baptist Bible Seminary; M.A., Farleigh 

Dickinson University; Ph.D., Marquette 

University. 

Timothy F. Sedgwick (S-WTS) Associate Professor 
of Ethics and Moral Theology 
A.B., Albion College;^M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt 
University. 

Charles M. Sell (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh; Th.M., Th.D., 
Dallas TTieological Seminary. 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) President and Professor 
of New Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; 
Baccalaureat en TTieologie, S.T.L., S.T.D., 
University of Louvain. 

Mark H. Senter, 111 (TEDS) Associate Professcyr of 
Christian Education 

Dip., Moody Bible Institute; B.A., University of 
Illinois, Circle Campus; M.A., Trinity 



Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., Loyola 
University, Chicago. 

Maureen M. Sepkoski (CTU) Vice President for 
Adrrdrustxation and Firuxnces 
B.A., St. Mary's College; M.B.A., University of 
Chicago. 

Jack L. Seymour (G-ETS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B.S., Ball State University; M.Div., D.Min., 
Vanderbilt University Divinity School; Ph.D., 
George Peabody College. 

Neil H. Shadle (M/L) Associate Professor of 
Mirustry and Dean of Students 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School; 
D.Min., Pacific School of Religion. 

Douglas R. Sharp (NBTS) Registrar and Director of 
Admissions and Associate Professor of Christian 
Theology 

B.A., William Jewell College; M.Div., 
American Baptist Seminary of the West; Ph.D., 
Graduate Theological Union. 

Norman Shawchuck (MTS) Director of Field 
Education and Adjunct Lecturer in Ministry 
B.A., Jamestown College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

John J. Shea (MS) Assistant Professor, Department 
of Systerruitic Theology; Program Director, Doctor 
of Mirustry Program 
S.T.D., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Steve Shim (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Pastoral 
Care 

B.A., Seoul National University; M.Div., 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., Claremont School of Theology. 

Dick W. Simpson (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., University of Texas; M.A., Indiana 
University; Ph.D., Indiana University; M.Div., 
McCormick Theological Semiriary. 

Mark S. Sisk (S-WTS) Dean and President 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.Div., D.D., The 
General Theological Seminary. 

Daniel S. Siwek (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Mirustry 

M.Div., S.T.L., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake. 



127 



Kenneth B. Smith, Sr. (CTS) President and 
Associate Professor of Ministry 
B.A., Virginia Union University; M.Div., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; D.D., Elmhurst 
College; D.P. S., National College of Education. 

Newland R Smith, 3rd (S-WTS) Librarian, 
Secretary to the Faculty, Associate Professor of 
Bibliography 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate 
Library School, University of Chicago; B.D., 
Garrett Theological Seminary. 

Klyne R. Snodgrass (NPTS) Professor of Biblical 
Literature and Dean of the Faculty 
B.A., Columbia Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of St. Andrews, Scotland. 

Graydon R Snyder (CTS) Professor of New 
Testament and Academic Dean 
B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study: Pontifical 
Institute of Christian Archaeology, Rome; 
Cambridge University. 



Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.R (CTU) Professor of Old 
Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; 
S.T.L., Catholic University; S.S.L., S.S.D., 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L., Sl 
Benedict College. 

Gorman G. Sullivan, O. Carm. (MS) Academic 
Dean and Instructor, Department of Systematic 
Theology and Associate Direcwr, Doctor of 
Ministry Program. 

M.A., University of Notre Dame; S.T. L., 
D.Min., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Paul R. Swansea (LSTC) Professor of Pastoral 
Care 

A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., Augustana 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Andover- 
Newton Theological School; Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

John Paul Szura, O.S.A. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Psychology and Theology 
B.A., Villanova University; M.A., St. Louis 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois Institute of 
Technology; Ph.D., Fordham University. 



James A. Speer (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Practical Theology, Church and Society 
B.A., Biola College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical 
Divinity School; M.Phil., Drew University 
Graduate School; Ph.D., Drew University 
Graduate School. 

William Richard Stegner (G-ETS) Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A,, University of Cincinnati; B.D., Drew 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University. 

K. James Stein (G-ETS) Jubilee Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Westmar College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; D.D,, Westmar College. 

W. Taylor Stevenson (S-WTS) Professor of 
Philosophical Theology 

B.A., Princeton University; B.D., Virginia 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Durham 

University. 

Clinton E. Stockwell (CCPM) Executive Director; 
(CrS/LSTC/MTS) Adjuna Faculty Meiriber 
B.A., Louisiana College; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D. cand., 
University of Illinois at Chicago. 



Sarah J. Tanzer (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Judaism and Christian Origms 
A.B., Dickinson College; M.T.S., Harvard 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Harvard University; 
Study: Hebrew University; Oxford University. 

Hycel C. Taylor (BTS) Distinguished Lecturer in 
Preaching 

B.A., Kent State University; M.Div., Oberlin 
Graduate School of Theology/Vanderbilt 
University; D.Min., Vanderbilt Divinity School. 

William D. Taylor (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Latin American Missions and Cross -Cultural 
Christian Education 

Diploma, Moody Bible Institute; B.A., North 
Texas State University; Th.M., Dallas 
TTieological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Texas, Austin. 

Francis S. Tebbe, O.RM. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Religious Education; Director of 
M.T.S. Program and Continuing Education 
B.A., Duns Scotus College; M.Div., St. Leonard 
School of Theology; M.Ed., Boston College; 
D.Min., Andover Newton Theological School. 

James H. Terry (TEDS) Director of Records 

A.A., Los Angeles City College; B.A., Biola 



128 



College; B.D., Th.M., Talbot Theological 
Seminary. 

Susan B. Thistlethwaite (CTS) Assosicate 
Professor of Theology and Cultme 
B.A., Smith College; M.Div., Duke Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Richard D. Tholin (G-ETS) Dorothy and Murray 
Leiffer Professor of Christian Social Ethics and 
Dean 

B.A., North Central. College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary. 

Frank A. Thomas (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Preaching 

B.A., University of Illinois at Champaign- 
Urbana; M.Div., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Northeastern Illinois 
University; D.Min., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; Study: United Theological Seminary. 

Sharon G. Thornton (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Pastoral Care & Theology 

B.A., University of Washington; M.Div., Pacific 
School of Religion; Ph.D. cand., Graduate 
Theological Union. 

Philip Tom (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 

M.A., University of Chicago; M.Div., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Barbara Troxell (G-ETS) Director of Field 
Education and Coordinator of Spiritual Formation 
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary; Study: Graduate 
Theological Union; Pacific School of Religion; 
University of Edinburgh. 

Ruth A. Tucker (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Mission 

B.A., LeTourneau College; M.A., Baylor 
University; Ph.D., Northern Illinois University. 

Robert G. Tuttle, Jr. (G-ETS) E. Stanley Jones 
Professor of Evangelism 

A.B., Duke University; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Wheaton 
Graduate School of Theology; Ph.D., University 
of Bristol. 

Mary R. Ulmer (CTU) Dean of Students and 
Community Services 

B.A., Mt. Mary College; M.A., Northern 
Illinois University; Th.M., Weston School of 
Theology. 



Kevin J. Vanhoozer (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 

BibUcal and Systematic Theology 

B.A., Westmont College; M.Div., Westminster 

Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Cambridge 

University. 

David L. Vikner (LSTC) Adjunct Professor of 
World Mission 

A.B., Augustana College; B.D., D.D., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; Study: Yale 
Divinity School; University of California, 
Berkeley. 

Linda Vogel (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.S., Boston University; M.R.E., Andover 
Newton Theological School; Ph.D., University 
of Iowa. 

Paul H. Wachdorf (MS) Associate, Dean of 
Formation and Director of Prayer Formation 
B.S., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of St. Mary of the Lake; M.C.Sp., 
Creightjon University, Omaha. 

Paul Wadell, C.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Ethics 

B.A., Bellarmine College; M.Div., M.A., 
Cadiolic Theological Union; Ph.D., University 
of Notre Dame. 

Murray L. Wagner (BTS) Professor of Historical 
Studies 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Andrew Wallace (LSTC/MTS) Adjurv:t Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., M.A., University of New Mexico; M.Div., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., 
University of Chicago. 

Walter Wangerin, Jr. (LSTC) Adjunct Professor of 
Theology and Literature 

B.A., Concordia Senior College, Ft. Wayne; 
M.A., Miami University; M.Div., Christ 
Seminary-Seminex. 

Ted W. Ward (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Mission, Dean of International 
Studies, Director of the Doctor of Education 
Program, G.W. Aldeen Chair of International 
Studies and Mission 

B.Mus.Ed., Wheaton College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Rorida. 



129 



Don Wardlaw (MTS) James G. K. McClure 
Professor c{ Preaching and Worship 
B.A., Columbia University; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., 
University of Aberdeen. 

Timothy M. Warner (TEDS) Professor of Mission 
and Dnecvcyr of the Professiorvd Doctoral Programs 
B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., Biblical 
Seminary; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., 
Indiana University. 

Robert Webber (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Christian Heritage 

B.A., Bob Jones University; B.D., Reformed 
Episcopal Seminary; Th.M., Covenant 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Concordia 
Theological Seminary. 

C. John Weborg (NPTS) Professor of Theology 

A.B., University of Nebraska; B.D., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett 
Evangelical Seminary and Northwestern 
University. 

Herold D. Weiss (NBTS) Affilkite Professor ofNeuj 
Testam£r\t 

B.A., Southern Mississippi College; M.A., B.D., 
Andrews University; Ph.D., Duke University; 
Study: Union Theological Seminary, New York; 
Pontifical Biblical Institute. 

Laurence L. Weibom (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., Harding College; M.A.R, Yale University 
Divinity School; M., Eberhard-Karl 
University of Tubingen; M.A., Vanderbilt 
University; M.A., Ph.D. cand., University of 
Chicago. 

Wayne C. Weld (NPTS) Professor of Missions 

A.B., University of Washington; B.D., M.A., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Andrew M. Weyermann (LSTC) Visiting Lecturer 
in Preaching 

B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. 
Louis; Study: University of Hamburg; 
Washington University; Union Theological 
Seminary. 

Bennie L. Whiten (CCPM/CTS) Adjunct Faculty 
in Mirustry; (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty Member 
M.Div., Howard University School of Religion. 



James R Will (G-ETS) Henry Pfe^er Professor of 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia 
University and Union Theological Seminary. 

Edward P. Wimberly (G-ETS) Associate Professor 
of Pastoral Care 

B.A., University of Arizona; S.T.B., S.TM., 
Boston University School of Theology; Ph.D., 
Boston University. 

James P. Wind (CCPM) Adjuna Faculty Member 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Christ 
Seminary-Seminex; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Douglas E. Wingeier (G-ETS) Professor of 
Practical Theology and Dean of the Summer 
School 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

Bartholomew S. Winters (MS) Associate Dean of 
Formation 
M.Div., University of St. Mary of the Lake. 

Charles L. Winters (S-WTS) Professor in Christian 
Ministries 

A.B., Brown University; M.Div., Virginia 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Union 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., General 
Theological Seminary. 

Patty K. Woerner (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.Div., McCormick 
TTieological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Richard J. Wojcik (MS) Professor, Department of 
Ministry and Director of Music 
M.A., S.TL., University of St. Mary of the 
Lake; M.C.G., Pontifical Institute of Sacred 
Music, Rome. 

John D. Woodbridge (TEDS) Professor of Church 
History and the History of Christian Thought 
A.B., Wheaton College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; Ph.D., University of Toulouse. 

Robert C. Worley (MTS) Vice-President for 
Academic Affairs , Dean of the Faculty and Haro Id 
Blake Walker Professor of Pastoral Theology 
B.A., Oklahoma State University; D.D.S., M.S., 
Northwestern University; B.D., McCormick 



130 



i 



Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia 
University. 

Jeremiah Wright (SCUPE) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., Howard University; D.D, Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Walter Wright, Jr. (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Ministry 

B.A., Simpson College; M.Div., Ph.D. Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Henry James Young (G-ETS) Associate Professor 
of Theology and EJucs 

B.A., Tougaloo College; Th.M., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D., Hartford 
Seminary Foundation. 

Quentin David Young (CCPM) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.S., M.B., M.D., Northwestern University 
Medical School; M.S., University of Illinois at 
Chicago. 

Warren Cameron Young (NBTS) Distinguished 
Professor of Christian Philosophy and Theology, 
Emeritus 

A.B., Gordon College; B.D., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 
University; Study: University of Heidelberg; 
University of Basel. 

Rodrigo Zapata Albuja (NBTS) Visiting 
Pastor/Scholar 

B.Hum., Colegio Nacional Vicente Rocafuente, 
Ecuador; Lie. Sc, Universidad Estatal de 
Guayaquil, Ecuador; Lie. Teol., Seminar io bib- 
lioamericano, Costa Rica; D. Teol. cand., 
Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca, Espafia. 

Martin A. Zielinski (MS) Instructor, Department of 
Church History 

B.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Div., 
University of vSt. Mary of the Lake; Ph.D., 
Catholic University of America. 

LIBRARIANS 

Jacquelyn L. Allen (TEDS) Catalo^ngUbrarian 
B.A., Bob Jones University; A.M.L.S., 
University of Michigan. 

Henry Baldwin, F. S.C. (MS) Librarian 

M.Ed., St. Mary's College, Winona; M.L.S., 
George Peabody College; M.A., Immaculate 
Conception Seminary, Mahwah, N.J. 



Mary R. Bischoff (LSTC/MTS) Director of the 
Jesuit'KrausS'McCormick Ubrary and Associate 
Professor 

B.A., University of Missouri; M.S. in L.S., 
University of Illinois; Study: Christ Seminary- 
Seminex; St. Louis University. 

Joan Blocher (CTS) Assistant Ubraxian 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Janet D. Boyle (CTU) Head ofTeckmcai Services 
B.A., Rosary College; M.S.L.S., University of 
Illinois; M.Div., Catholic Theological Union. 

Alva Caldwell (G-ETS) Librarian for Program and 
Planning, The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Deborah J. Cocanig (CTU) Cataloger 

B.A., College of St. Francis; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Eugene C. Fieg, Jr. (BTS/NBTS) ActmgDireaar 
B.A., Maryville College; M.Div., Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of 
Chicago; M.L.S., Rosary College. 

Neil W. Gerdes (M/L and CTS) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; 
M.A.L.S., University of Chicago. 

Norma S. Goertzen (NPTS) Seminary Librarian 
and Assistant Professor of Theolo^cal Bibliography 
B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated 
Mennonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory 
University. 

Loren Hagen (G-ETS/S-WTS) Catalog Librarian, 
The United Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 
B.A., M.A., Ph.C, M. Libr., University of 
Washington. 

Elvire Hilgert (JKM) Public Service Librarian 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.S. in L.S., 
Catholic University of America; Study: 
Adventist Tlieological Seminary; University of 
the Philippines, Manila; University of Basel. 

David K. Himrod (G-ETS/S-WTS) Assistant 
Librarian for Reader Services, The United Library, 
G-ETS/S-WTS 
B.S., California Institute of Technology; M.Th., 



131 



School of Theology at Claremont; Ph.D., 
University of California, Los Angeles. 

Helen Kenik MainelU (BTS/NBTS) Director of 
The Seminary Library, BTS/NBTS, and 
Assodau Professor of Theological Bibliography 
B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S., Loyola 
University; MLIS, University of California, 
Berkeley; Ph.D., St. Louis University. 

Joan McGovern, S.S.N.D. (JKM) Cataloguing 
Librarian 

B.A., Mount Mary College; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Ian B. Oliver (JKM) Director of the Ecumenical 
Parish Resource Center 

B.A., Amherst College; M.A., University of 
Chicago Divinity School. 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Directcrr of Library 
M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois, Study: University of 
Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint Louis 
University, Spalding College. 

Brewster Porcella (TEDS) Librarian 

A.B., A.M., NXOieaton College; B.D., Faith 



Theological Seminary; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Illinois. 

Emilie G. Pulver (JKM) Technical Services 
Librarian 

B.A., Case Western Reserve University; M.L.S.; 
University of Chicago. 

Newland F. Smith, 3rd (S-WTS) Librarian for 
Collection Development, The United LQnary, 
G'ETSIS'WTS, and Associate Professor of 
BibUc^cphy 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate 
Library School, University of Chicago; B.D., 
Garrett Theological Seminary. 

John W. Thompson (G-ETS/S-WTS) Head of 
Bibliographic Control, The United Library, 
G'ETSIS'WTS 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., University of 
Chicago; M.A., Graduate Library School, 
University of Chicago. 

Keith R Wells (TEDS) Reference Librarian 

B.A., Westminster College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; M.L.S., University 
of Pittsburgh. 



LOCATIONS OF ACTS SCHOOLS 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS TO GET TO EACH AREA OF THE MAP: 

1. To MS: MS is located in Mundelein, forty miles northwest of downtown Chicago, and may 
be reached by car via the Tri-State Tollway (I'94) north to the Route 176 exit, 176 west to 
Mundelein. MS located on the north side of 176. 

2. To TEDS: TEDS is located in the northwest suburb of Deerfield and may be reached by car 
via the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to the Route 22 exit. TEDS is immediately to the east of 
the expressway off Route 22. 

3. To G'ETS and S-WTS: G-ETS and S-WTS are located respectively on the east and west 
sides of Sheridan Road on the Northwestern University campus in Evanston. They may be 
reached either by car via the Lake Shore Drive (North) to Sheridan Road or by public transporta- 
tion with the CTA elevated train to the Noyes Street station. 

4. To NPTS: NPTS is located on the far north side of Chicago and may be reached by car via 
the Chicago metropolitan expressway system either from the Lake Shore Drive (North) or the 
Kennedy Expressway (1-90/94), and by public transportation with CTA elevated Howard train to 
the Berwyn Street station and connecting bus or the Ravenswood line to Kimball Street station. 

5. To BTS and NBTS: BTS and NETS are located on adjacent campuses in west-suburban 
Oak Brook and Lombard, and may be reached by car via the East- West Tollway (1-88), Highland 
Avenue north to Butterfield Road (Route 56), Butterfield Road east. NBTS is north of Butterfield 
Road just west of BTS, which is located in the northwest corner of the intersection of Butterfield 
and Myers Roads. 

6. To CTU, CTS, LSTC, M/L and MTS: All five schools are located in close proximity to 
one another in the Hyde Park area of Chicago near the University of Chicago. They may be 
reached by car via the Chicago metropolitan expressway system either from the Lake Shore C)rive 
(South) or the Dan Ryan Expressway (1-90/94), and by puUic transportation either with the CTA 
elevated train or IC (Illinois Central) to the respective 55th Street stations and connecting buses. 



132 



EO 



1. 



4 MILES 



© 



Legend: 

BTS Bethany Theological Seminary 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

G-ETS Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

M/L Meadville Lombard Theological School 

MS Mundelein Seminary 

NPTS North Park Theological Seminary 

NBTS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

S-WTS Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 



$- 



3. 



^ 



O'HARf 



EVANSTON 



.f^ 



^^^ 



o^' 



\Q>^ 



.\^ 



(45) 



.s^' 



^ 



^^- 



EISENHOWER EXPRESSWAY 



cOV^ 



\HP^^ 



.^!l 



(ts!; 



.r^^i 



CHICAGO 
LOOP